424B7
Table of Contents

Filed pursuant to Rule 424(b)(7)
Registration No. 333-175637

 

The information in this preliminary prospectus supplement is not complete and may be changed. This preliminary prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are part of an effective registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This preliminary prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are not an offer to sell, and it is not soliciting an offer to buy, these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

Subject to completion, dated March 14, 2016

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT

(To Prospectus dated August 26, 2011)

2,000,000 Shares

 

LOGO

COOPER-STANDARD HOLDINGS INC.

Common Stock

 

 

The selling stockholders identified in this prospectus supplement are offering 2,000,000 shares of common stock of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. in this offering. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of our common stock by the selling stockholders.

We have agreed to purchase from the underwriters             shares, or the Repurchased Shares, of the 2,000,000 shares of our common stock offered hereby having an aggregate value of up to $25 million at a price per share equal to the price to the selling stockholders for the shares offered hereby and not purchased by us. The actual number of shares to be purchased by us will depend on market conditions and other factors. We refer to the shares offered hereby and not purchased by us as the Marketed Shares.

Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange, or NYSE, under the trading symbol “CPS.” On March 11, 2016, the last sale price of our common stock as reported on NYSE was $77.60 per share.

 

 

This investment involves risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page S-17 of this prospectus supplement and in the documents we incorporate by reference into this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus.

 

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved of anyone’s investment in these securities or determined if this prospectus supplement is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

     Per Share     Total  

Public offering price

   $                   $          (4) 

Underwriting discounts and commissions(1)

   $          (2)    $     

Proceeds to selling stockholders before expenses(3)

   $        $                

 

(1) We have agreed to pay 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares sold by the selling stockholders pursuant to this prospectus supplement. The selling stockholders will pay the remaining 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares. See “Underwriting” for additional information regarding underwriting compensation.
(2) Represents the underwriting discount that is payable on the Marketed Shares. The underwriters will not receive any underwriting discount or commission on the Repurchased Shares.
(3) Represents proceeds to the selling stockholders before expenses for the sale by the selling stockholders to the underwriters of the Marketed Shares at a price of $         per share and the Repurchased Shares at a price of $         per share. See “Underwriting.”
(4) Includes the sale of                         shares of our common stock to us at a price of $         per share.

The selling stockholders identified in this prospectus supplement have granted the underwriters an option to purchase up to 300,000 shares of common stock at the public offering price, less the underwriting discount payable by the selling stockholders, for 30 days after the date of this prospectus supplement. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of common stock by the selling stockholders, including from any exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase additional shares from such selling stockholders.

The underwriters expect to deliver the shares against payment in New York, New York on                         , 2016.

 

 

 

Goldman, Sachs & Co.   BofA Merrill Lynch

 

 

 

KeyBanc Capital Markets

Sterne Agee CRT

  The Buckingham Research Group Incorporated

 

 

Prospectus supplement dated                         , 2016.


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Prospectus Supplement

   Page  

About this Prospectus Supplement

     S-iii   

Industry and Market Data

     S-iv   

Trademarks and Service Marks

     S-iv   

Prospectus Supplement Summary

     S-1   

Risk Factors

     S-17   

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

     S-29   

Use of Proceeds

     S-31   

Market Price of Common Stock

     S-31   

Dividend Policy

     S-31   

Capitalization

     S-33   

Selected Historical Financial Data

     S-34   

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations

     S-35   

Business

     S-53   

Management

     S-65   

Selling Stockholders

     S-70   

Material United States Federal Income and Estate Tax Consequences to Non-U.S. Holders

     S-73   

Underwriting

     S-77   

Legal Matters

     S-84   

Experts

     S-84   

Where You Can Find More Information

     S-84   

Incorporation by Reference

     S-84   

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

     F-1   

 

Prospectus

   Page  

About this Prospectus

     ii   

Prospectus Summary

     1   

Risk Factors

     5   

Forward-Looking Statements

     12   

The Company

     14   

Ratio of Earnings to Combined Fixed Charges and Preferred Stock Dividends

     17   

Dividend Policy

     17   

Use of Proceeds

     17   

Market for our Common Stock and Warrants and Related Stockholder Matters

     18   

Selling Security Holders

     19   

Description of Capital Stock

     24   

Description of Certain Indebtedness

     32   

Certain U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations

     36   

Plan of Distribution

     43   

Legal Matters

     45   

Experts

     45   

Where You Can Find More Information

     45   

Incorporation of Certain Information by Reference

     46   

 

 

 

 

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You should rely only on information contained in or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and any related free writing prospectus. We and the selling stockholders have not, and the underwriters have not, authorized anyone to provide any information or to make any representations other than those contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus or in any free writing prospectuses we have prepared and take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. This prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are an offer to sell only the shares offered hereby, but only under circumstances and in jurisdictions where it is lawful to do so. The information contained in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus is current only as of its date. Our business, financial condition, results of operation and prospects may have changed since that date.

 

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT

This document has two parts, a prospectus supplement and an accompanying prospectus dated August 26, 2011. This prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are part of a registration statement that we filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which we refer to as the SEC, utilizing the SEC’s “shelf” registration process. This prospectus supplement, which describes certain matters relating to us and the specific terms of this offering of shares of common stock, adds to and updates information contained in the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference herein and in the accompanying prospectus. Generally, when we refer to this document, we are referring to both parts of this document combined. Both this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus include important information about us, our common stock and other information you should know before investing in our common stock. The accompanying prospectus gives more general information, some of which may not apply to the shares of common stock offered by this prospectus supplement. To the extent the information contained in this prospectus supplement differs or varies from the information contained in the accompanying prospectus, you should rely on the information contained in this prospectus supplement. If the information contained in this prospectus supplement differs or varies from the information contained in a document we have incorporated by reference, you should rely on the information in the more recent document.

Before you invest in our common stock, you should read the registration statement of which this document forms a part and this document, including the documents incorporated by reference herein that are described under the heading “Incorporation by Reference.”

The distribution of this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus and the offering of the common stock in certain jurisdictions may be restricted by law. Neither we, the selling stockholders nor the underwriters are making an offer of the common stock in any jurisdiction where the offer is not permitted. Persons who come into possession of this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus should inform themselves about and observe any such restrictions. This prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus do not constitute, and may not be used in connection with, an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such offer or solicitation is not authorized or in which the person making such offer or solicitation is not qualified to do so or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such offer or solicitation.

You should not consider any information in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus to be investment, legal or tax advice. You should consult your own counsel, accountant and other advisors for legal, tax, business, financial and related advice regarding the purchase of the common stock. Neither we, the selling stockholders nor the underwriters are making any representation to you regarding the legality of an investment in the common stock by you under applicable investment or similar laws.

 

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INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

Some market data and other statistical information presented or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement are based on data from various independent third-party sources, including independent industry publications, reports by market research firms and other independent sources. Other data is based on management’s estimates and calculations, which are derived from our review and interpretation of internal analyses, as well as third party sources. Although we believe these third party sources are reliable, we have not independently verified any information and cannot guarantee its accuracy and completeness. To the extent that we have been unable to obtain information from third party sources, we have expressed our belief on the basis of our own internal analyses of our products and capabilities in comparison to our competitors.

TRADEMARKS AND SERVICE MARKS

We own or have rights to various trademarks, service marks and trade names that we use in connection with the operation of our business. Other trademarks, service marks and trade names appearing or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement are the property of their respective owners. The trademarks we own or have the right to use include, without limitation, Cooper-Standard, ArmorHose, Ultra Pro Coat, MagAlloy and Fortrex. Solely for convenience, the trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement may appear without the ®, TM or SM symbols, but the absence of such references does not indicate the registration status of the trademarks, service marks and trade names and is not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the right of the applicable licensor to such trademarks, service marks and trade names.

 

 

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PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus and does not contain all of the information you should consider before investing in shares of our common stock. You should carefully read this entire prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus, including the information incorporated by reference herein, the information included under the section entitled “Risk Factors” and the financial statements and the related notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement, before you decide to invest in shares of our common stock.

Except where the context requires otherwise, references in this prospectus supplement to “CPS,” “Cooper Standard,” “the Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc., together with its consolidated subsidiaries.

Our Business

Cooper Standard is a leading manufacturer of sealing, fuel and brake delivery, fluid transfer and anti-vibration systems. Our products are primarily for use in passenger vehicles and light trucks that are manufactured by global automotive original equipment manufacturers, or OEMs, and replacement markets. We believe we are the largest global producer of sealing systems, the second largest global producer of the types of fuel and brake delivery products that we manufacture, the third largest global producer of fluid transfer systems, and one of the largest North American producers of anti-vibration systems.

We design and manufacture our products in each major region of the world through a disciplined and sustained approach to engineering and operational excellence. As of December 31, 2015, our operations were conducted through 98 wholly owned, leased and joint venture facilities in 20 countries, of which 79 are predominantly manufacturing facilities and 19 have design, engineering, administrative or logistics designation(s). The countries in which we operate include Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States. For the year ended December 31, 2015, we generated approximately 53% of our sales in North America, 31% in Europe, 13% in Asia Pacific, and 3% in South America.

We believe that we are well-positioned for growth from increasing global vehicle production volumes, increasing average content of our products on each vehicle produced, and our continued new business wins with existing and new customers. For the year ended December 31, 2015, approximately 82% of our sales were to OEMs, including Ford Motor Company, or Ford, General Motors Company, or GM, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, or FCA, PSA Peugeot Citroën, Volkswagen Group, Daimler, Renault-Nissan, BMW, Toyota, Volvo, Jaguar/Land Rover and Honda and various other OEMs based in India and China. The remaining 18% of our 2015 sales were primarily to Tier I and Tier II automotive suppliers, non-automotive manufacturers, and replacement market distributors.

 



 

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The following chart illustrates our balance and business diversity by providing a breakdown of our $3.3 billion in sales for the year ended December 31, 2015 by geography, customer, and product line.

 

LOGO

We conduct substantially all of our activities through our subsidiaries and sell our product lines through four reportable segments—North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and South America. For the year ended December 31, 2015, we had sales in such segments of $1.8 billion, $1.0 billion, $0.4 billion, and $0.1 billion, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2015, we generated sales of $3.3 billion, net income of $111.9 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $362.4 million. See “Prospectus Supplement Summary—Summary Financial and Other Data” for a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. See “Business” for a more detailed description of our business.

Products

We have four distinct product lines. These products are produced and supplied globally to a broad range of customers in multiple markets. The percentage of sales by product for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013 are as follows:

 

     Percentage of Sales  

Product Line

   2015     2014     2013  

Sealing systems

     53     52     51

Fuel and brake delivery systems

     20     20     23

Fluid transfer systems

     14     14     13

Anti-vibration systems

     8     8     9

 



 

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In addition to these product lines, we also have sales to other adjacent markets.

 

Product Lines

         

Market Position

SEALING SYSTEMS

  Protect vehicle interiors from weather, dust and noise intrusion for improved driving experience; provide aesthetic and functional class-A exterior surface treatment   Global leader
  Products:    
 

–   Fortrex

 

–   Stainless steel trim

 
 

–   Dynamic seals

 

–   Flush glass systems

 
 

–   Static seals

 

–   Variable extrusion

 
 

–   Encapsulated glass

 

–   Specialty sealing products

 

FUEL & BRAKE DELIVERY SYSTEMS

  Sense, deliver and control fluids to fuel and brake systems   Top 2 globally
 

Products:

   
 

–   Chassis and tank fuel lines and bundles (fuel lines, vapor lines and bundles)

 

–   Direct injection & port fuel rails (fuel rails and fuel charging assemblies)

 
 

–   Metallic brake lines and bundles

 

–   Quick connects

 

FLUID TRANSFER SYSTEMS

  Sense, deliver and control fluid and vapors for optimal powertrain & HVAC operation   Top 3 globally
 

Products:

   
 

–   Heater/coolant hoses

 

–   Turbo charger hoses

 
 

–   Quick connects

 

–   Secondary air hoses

 
 

–   DPF and SCR emission lines

 

–   Brake and clutch hoses

 
 

–   Degas tanks

 

–   ArmorHose

 
 

–   Air intake and charge

 

–   ArmorHose II

 
 

–   Transmission Oil Cooling Hoses

 

–   ArmorHose TPV

 

ANTI-VIBRATION SYSTEMS

  Control and isolate noise and vibration in the vehicle to improve ride and handling   North America leader
  Products:    
 

–   Powertrain Mount Systems: (Multi-state Vacuum Switchable Hydraulic Engine Mounts, Bi-state Electric Switchable Hydraulic Engine Mounts, Conventional Hydraulic Mounts, Elastomeric Mounts)

 

–   Suspension Mounts: (Conventional & Hydraulic Bushings, Strut Mounts, Spring Seats & Bumpers, Mass Dampers, Dual Durometer (Bi-compound) Bushings)

 



 

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Our Industry

The automotive industry is one of the world’s largest and most competitive. Consumer demand for new vehicles largely determines sales and production volumes of global OEMs.

The automotive supplier industry is generally characterized by high barriers to entry, significant start-up costs and long-standing customer relationships. The criteria by which OEMs judge automotive suppliers include quality, price, service, performance, design and engineering capabilities, innovation, timely delivery, financial stability and global footprint. Over the last decade, suppliers that have been able to achieve manufacturing scale, reduce structural costs, diversify their customer base and establish a global footprint have been successful.

New vehicle sales are expected to increase in certain regions of the world, particularly in Asia, where we have a strong local market presence. Asia is the largest and fastest growing market for light vehicles in the world.

Competition in the automotive supplier industry is intense and has increased in recent years as OEMs have demonstrated a preference for stronger relationships with fewer suppliers. There are typically three or more significant competitors and numerous smaller competitors for most of the products we produce. Automotive suppliers with a global manufacturing footprint capable of fully servicing customers around the world will continue to lead the supply industry going forward. OEMs have shifted certain research and development, design and testing responsibility to suppliers. At the same time they have shortened new product cycle times. To remain competitive, suppliers must have state-of-the-art engineering and design capabilities and must be able to continuously improve their engineering, design and manufacturing processes to effectively service the customer. Suppliers are increasingly expected to collaborate on, or assume the product design and development of, key automotive components and to provide innovative solutions to meet evolving technologies aimed at improved emissions and fuel economy.

Pricing pressure has continued as competition for market share has reduced the overall profitability of the industry and resulted in continued pressure on suppliers for price reductions. Consolidations and market share shifts among vehicle manufacturers continue to put additional pressures on the supply chain. These pricing and market pressures will continue to drive our focus on reducing our overall cost structure through continuous improvement initiatives, capital redeployment, restructuring and other cost management processes.

The automotive industry is increasingly being shaped by tightening government regulations for vehicle safety, fuel efficiency, and emissions controls. OEMs continue to focus on improving occupant and pedestrian safety in order to meet increasingly stringent regulatory requirements in various critical markets. Similarly, OEMs must focus on fuel economy and reducing emissions to meet increasingly stringent standards imposed by governmental authorities around the world. As a result, suppliers are increasingly focused on developing technologies and products designed to improve vehicle safety, emissions and fuel economy. Suppliers who can provide product solutions in these areas will realize greater opportunities for above-market growth.

Our Competitive Strengths

Innovative and High Quality Products

We believe we have distinguished ourselves in the automotive industry through our engineering and technological capabilities, as evidenced by our i3 innovations group and the recent development of

 



 

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several key innovative product and technology solutions including our MagAlloy coating process, Quick Connect with integrated sensor technology, ArmorHose product line and our revolutionary new Fortrex material technology. Our innovative products increase the lifespan of automotive components such as fuel and brake lines, improve efficiency in the assembly process and reduce material and weight in vehicles. Over the last three years, we have spent $314.3 million on engineering, research and development to further develop innovative products. We believe our focus on innovation and our delivery of innovative products and solutions provides us with a sustainable competitive advantage.

In addition, we believe we have a reputation for outstanding quality within the automotive industry, a factor that has been important to maintaining and expanding our successful relationships with our customers. We have earned numerous awards, including the DaimlerChrysler Global Supplier Award, GM Supplier of the Year, Ford’s Silver World Excellence Award and Toyota’s Cost Excellence Performance Award.

Global Manufacturing Footprint

We have established an advantaged global manufacturing footprint from which we serve our customers worldwide. Our global operations include 79 facilities which are predominantly utilized for our manufacturing operations. Our operations are located in Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States. Since 2004, we have increased the proportion of our sales outside North America from 30% to 47%, largely reflecting our focus on obtaining and retaining business on high-volume global platforms. As part of our strategy, we operate several successful international joint ventures, which have allowed us to enter into new geographic markets, to establish new customer relationships and to expand our products, technologies and capabilities. Our joint venture partners provide knowledge and insight into local markets and access to local suppliers of raw materials and components. We believe our global manufacturing footprint and proximity to customers provides us with a competitive advantage in the areas of customer service, improved logistics and lower costs.

World-Class Operations/Cooper Standard Operating System

In an ongoing effort to reduce our cost structure, we run a global continuous improvement program, as well as implementation of lean tools, structured problem solving, best business practices, standardized processes and change management.

We also evaluate opportunities to consolidate facilities and to relocate certain operations to lower cost countries. We believe we will continue to be successful in our efforts to improve our design and engineering capability and manufacturing processes while achieving cost savings due to the flexible nature of our manufacturing capabilities, our highly efficient operations and our ability to leverage economies of scale from the high volumes of products we produce for the world’s top-selling vehicle platforms. We have created a culture of continuous improvement and lean manufacturing in all aspects of our operations. Over the life cycle of each platform, we focus on streamlining manufacturing, increasing automation and reducing material and other costs in an effort to generate additional operational savings. We budget and track operational savings at the facility level, which management regularly reports and reviews.

Strong Customer Relations and Program Management 

We believe that our customer relationships, program management capabilities, global presence, comprehensive product line, excellence in manufacturing, product innovation and quality assurance

 



 

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combine to provide us with significant competitive advantages. We have proven our ability to expand globally with customers, increase scale in a consolidating industry and be first-to-market with design and engineering innovations.

We have a high level of dedication to customer service, and for each major product launch we dedicate a team of sales representatives, engineers, quality specialists and senior management, who work together to ensure that the product launch is completed on time and consistent with rigorous quality standards. These characteristics have allowed us to remain a leading supplier to Ford and GM while steadily growing our business with European and Asian OEMs. Our capabilities are evidenced by our success in being awarded significant content on our customers’ top-selling platforms, including the Ford F-Series and GM’s Silverado, Sierra, Tahoe, Yukon and Escalade vehicle models.

Incumbent Position Across Diverse Customer Base

As the incumbent supplier to platforms, we have typically participated in the design of their successor platforms, and therefore, we believe we have been afforded a competitive advantage to win the upgrade and the ultimate replacement business. In addition, we believe that our presence on our largest customers’ highest-volume and most important platforms is a competitive advantage that allows us to further increase our market share, cross-sell our other product lines, fully leverage our lean initiatives, spread our fixed costs over higher volumes and increase our return on capital.

Experienced Management Team

Our senior management team has extensive background in the automotive industry. Our management team is focused on guiding us through the challenges facing the automotive industry and the changing economic environment through ongoing and continued cost reduction and restructuring initiatives and is intent on continuing to implement our business strategies. For more information on our executive officers, see “Management.”

Adaptable Approach to Global Manufacturing Footprint to Ensure Continued Profitability

We continuously evaluate our global manufacturing footprint to ensure we are optimizing our operations to remain accessible to our customers while driving cost improvement. We are currently in the process of transitioning a significant portion of our manufacturing operations from high-cost to low-cost countries. In Europe, we have transferred many of our manufacturing operations in Western Europe to lower cost countries in Eastern Europe. In addition, we have restructured our European employee base by increasing the percentage of lower cost local employees. Both of these efforts have allowed us to decrease our operating costs and drive increased profitability without sacrificing product quality. In North America, we have added significant production capacity and headcount in Mexico while maintaining or reducing production capacity in Canada and the United States. Our current forecasts anticipate a continuation of these trends.

Driving Profitable Growth and Cash Flow Generation

We are committed to growing shareholder value by driving profitable growth, increased Adjusted EBITDA, and strong cash flow generation. We continue to drive revenue growth through increased market share and targeted growth in China, and our Adjusted EBITDA margins continue to grow through our restructuring efforts. Since 2013, our Adjusted EBITDA margin has increased from 9.3% to 10.8% for the year ended December 31, 2015. We are also driving increased cash flow through rigorous capital management. Capital expenditure levels are being reduced to levels in line with our

 



 

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industry peers following a period of higher spending which was necessitated by deferred maintenance during the most recent cyclical downturn. In addition, we are focused on reducing working capital through optimizing inventory, receivables and payables.

Our Business Strategy

Our business strategy is to drive for profitable growth, become one of the thirty largest global automotive suppliers in terms of sales, and among the top 5% of global automotive suppliers in terms of return on invested capital (what we refer to as “Top 30 / Top 5”). We are seeking to realize this vision by matching our priorities and strengths to the emerging global industry environment by:

 

    Focusing on core product lines;

 

    Producing superior products as a recognized innovation leader;

 

    Creating an advantaged global manufacturing footprint to support customers;

 

    Commonizing and standardizing world-class engineering and manufacturing operations;

As the Company continues to grow, we will look to further evolve our strategy to create additional opportunities to drive shareholder value.

Operational and Strategic Initiatives

As part of our profitable growth strategy, we implemented the Cooper Standard Operating System, or CSOS, to fully position the Company for growth and ensure global consistency in engineering design, program management, manufacturing process, purchasing and IT systems. Standardization across all regions is especially critical in support of customers’ global platforms that require the same design, quality and delivery standards everywhere across the world.

The CSOS consists of the following areas, with a strategic focus that aligns with the Company’s growth strategy:

 

CSOS Function

  

Strategic Focus

World-Class Safety

   Implement globally consistent measurement system with zero incidents goal.

World-Class Operations

   Optimize global performance by implementing best business practices across the organization.

Continuous Improvement

   Implement lean manufacturing tools across all facilities to achieve cost savings and increased performance.

Global Purchasing

   Develop an advantaged supply base to effectively leverage scale and optimize supplier quality.

Innovation Management

   Focused innovation processes to create breakthrough technologies for market differentiation.

Global Program Management

   Ensure consistent and flawless product launch process across all regions.

IT Systems

   Implement common systems to effectively communicate information throughout the business.

 



 

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Leverage Technology for Innovative Solutions

We utilize our technical expertise to provide customers with innovative solutions. Our engineers combine product design with a broad understanding of material characteristics for enhanced vehicle performance. We believe our reputation for successful innovation in product design and materials is the reason our customers consult us early in their vehicle development and design process of their next generation vehicles.

Cooper Standard has evolved and further energized its approach to innovation with its i3 Innovation Process (Imagine, Initiate, Innovate). This approach is used as a mechanism to capture ideas from across our Company and supply partners while promoting a culture of innovation.

Ideas are carefully evaluated by a Global Technology Council and those that are selected are put on an accelerated development cycle with a dedicated innovation team focused on breakthrough ideas. This team is developing innovative technologies based on materials expertise, process know-how, and application vision, which will drive future product direction. Among recently announced technologies is ArmorHose, a breakthrough technology which results in significantly more durable coolant hoses, and eliminates the need for separate abrasion sleeves on under-hood hose assemblies. Several other significant technologies, especially related to advanced materials, processing and weight reduction have recently been realized. These include: Fortrex, a revolutionary material that provides higher performance and lower weight to weather seals; and MagAlloy, a new processing technology for brake lines that increases long term durability through superior corrosion resistance.

Continued Emphasis on Global Platforms

We believe global platforms will drive increased growth for capable global suppliers. Our global presence and technological capabilities ideally position us to win business on global platforms. Based on our 2015 revenue, six of the top ten vehicle platforms on which we provide content are global platforms, which demonstrates that customers already look to us to support global platforms. It is predicted that the top ten global platforms produced by automakers will account for about 30% of the world’s light vehicle volume by 2021, further highlighting the importance of being well-positioned to participate in these high volume global programs.

Invest in Emerging Markets to Accelerate Growth

We are committed to expanding our presence in Asia. In China, vehicle production is expected to grow at a 4.1% CAGR from 2015 through 2020 to 30 million vehicles. Accordingly, we have accelerated the Company’s sealing business growth and provided additional growth opportunities with domestic Chinese automakers across product lines through the Huayu-Cooper Standard Sealing Systems Co., or Shenya, transaction, which resulted in our 95% majority stake in the largest Chinese automotive sealing supplier. Additionally, our Cooper Standard / INOAC JV has accelerated fluid transfer systems growth and provides additional growth opportunities with Japanese OEMs in China and Southeast Asia. In India, we have launched new sealing and fuel and brake facilities to expand our market leading positions for both product lines. We have also become 100% owner of our existing sealing JV and have expanded our relationship with Sujan Group with a new fluid transfer systems JV. Collectively, these initiatives further develop our global platform to serve our global customer base.

Pursue Acquisitions and Strategic Alliances to Enhance Capabilities and Accelerate Growth

We intend to continue to selectively pursue complementary acquisitions and joint ventures to enhance our customer base, geographic penetration, scale and technology. Consolidation is an

 



 

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industry trend and is encouraged by the OEMs’ desire for global automotive suppliers. We believe we have a strong platform for growth through acquisitions based on our past integration successes, experienced management team, global presence and operational excellence. We currently operate through several successful joint ventures.

Share Repurchase Program and Concurrent Share Purchase

On March 14, 2016, we announced that our Board of Directors has approved a securities repurchase program, authorizing us to repurchase, in the aggregate, up to $125 million of our outstanding common stock or warrants to purchase common stock. The authorization replaces the remaining balance of a previous $50 million repurchase program authorized in May 2013. Under the program authorized by the Board of Directors, repurchases may be made on the open market or through private transactions, as determined by our management and in accordance with prevailing market conditions and Securities and Exchange Commission requirements. We are not obligated to acquire a particular number of securities, and the program may be discontinued at any time at our discretion.

Of such $125 million, we have agreed to purchase from the underwriters up to $25 million of shares of common stock at a price per share equal to the price to the selling stockholders for the Marketed Shares. We refer to this purchase as the share purchase. Assuming a purchase price equal to $77.60 per share, the last sale price of our common stock on the NYSE on March 11, 2016, and purchase by us of $25 million of shares, this would result in a purchase by us of 322,164 shares of common stock offered hereby. The actual number of shares to be purchased by us will depend on market conditions and other factors.

We intend to fund the share purchase with available cash. The completion of the share purchase is contingent on the satisfaction of customary closing conditions and conditioned upon, among other things, the completion of this offering.

Corporate Information

Cooper-Standing Holdings Inc. was incorporated in Delaware in December 2004. In August 2009, following the onset of the financial crisis and economic downturn that severely impacted the global automotive industry, Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries in the United States and Canada commenced reorganization proceedings in the United States and Canada. In May 2010, the Company consummated its reorganization pursuant to a court-confirmed plan of reorganization and emerged from the Chapter 11 proceedings and the Canadian proceedings.

In October 2013, the Company’s common stock was listed on the NYSE and began trading under the ticker symbol “CPS.” Prior to the NYSE listing, the Company’s common stock was traded on the Over-the-Counter, or OTC, Bulletin Board under the symbol “COSH.”

Our principal executive offices are located at 39550 Orchard Hill Place Drive, Novi, Michigan 48375 and our telephone number is (248) 596-5900. Our website address is www.cooperstandard.com. The information contained on, or accessible through, our website is not part of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus and is not incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus.

 



 

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The Offering

The following summary of the offering contains basic information about the offering and our common stock and is not intended to be complete. It does not contain all the information that may be important to you. For a more complete understanding of our common stock, please refer to the section of the accompanying prospectus entitled “Description of Capital Stock.”

 

Issuer

   Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

Common stock offered by the selling stockholders

  


2,000,000 shares.

Common stock to be sold to the public

                        shares.

Common stock to be purchased by us

                        shares.

Common stock to be outstanding immediately after this offering and the share purchase

  


                     shares.

Option to purchase additional shares of common stock from the selling stockholders

  


The selling stockholders have granted the underwriter a 30-day option from the date of this prospectus supplement to purchase up to 300,000 additional shares of our common stock at the public offering price, less underwriting discounts payable by the selling stockholders. We have agreed to pay 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares sold by the selling stockholders pursuant to this prospectus supplement, including the shares sold pursuant to the underwriters’ option. The selling stockholders will pay the remaining 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares.

Use of proceeds

   We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of any shares of our common stock by the selling stockholders, including from any exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase additional shares from the selling stockholders. See “Use of Proceeds.”

Share purchase

   Subject to completion of this offering, we have agreed to purchase shares of our common stock from the underwriters having an aggregate value of up to $25 million at $         per share, which is equal to the price to the selling stockholders for the Marketed Shares.

Dividend policy

   We have never paid or declared a dividend on our common stock and we have no current plan to pay dividends on our common stock. Any decision to declare and pay dividends in the future will be made at the sole discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, capital requirements, financial condition, contractual

 



 

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   restrictions, restrictions in our debt agreements, general economic conditions, state law requirements and other factors that our Board of Directors may deem relevant. Additionally, our existing credit facilities contain covenants limiting our ability to pay dividends to stockholders. See “Dividend Policy.”

Risk factors

   See “Risk Factors” for a discussion of risks you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our common stock.

NYSE trading symbol

   “CPS”

Unless otherwise indicated, information in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus with respect to the number of shares of our common stock to be outstanding immediately after the consummation of this offering and the share purchase is based on 17,543,251 shares of common stock outstanding as of March 10, 2016 and does not reflect:

 

    1,139,093 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of 1,135,686 warrants to purchase shares of common stock outstanding;

 

    2,027,217 shares of common stock reserved for future issuance under our Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan”);

 

    1,216,409 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of outstanding options issued under the 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan at a weighted exercise price of $47.84431 per share; or

 

    468,041 shares of common stock issuable upon vesting of outstanding restricted stock units and stock settled performance units at target.

Unless otherwise indicated, this prospectus supplement reflects and assumes the purchase by us of $25 million of shares at the purchase price of $77.60 per share, which is the last sale price of our common stock on the NYSE on March 11, 2016, or 322,164 shares, and the retirement of such shares upon purchase by us.

Unless otherwise indicated, this prospectus supplement reflects and assumes no exercise by the underwriters of their 30-day option to purchase up to 300,000 additional shares from the selling stockholders at the public offering price, less the underwriting discounts payable by the selling stockholders. We have agreed to pay 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares sold by the selling stockholders pursuant to this prospectus supplement, including the shares sold pursuant to the underwriters’ option. The selling stockholders will pay the remaining 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares.

 



 

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Summary Financial and Other Data

The following table shows summary historical consolidated financial and other data for Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. for the periods and as of the dates presented. The summary historical consolidated financial information as of December 31, 2015 and 2014 and for each of the three years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement. The summary historical consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2013 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement.

You should read the following summary financial and other data together with the information under “Selected Financial Data,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Risk Factors” and our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015     2014     2013  
     (dollars in thousands, except for share and
per share amounts)
 

Statements of Net Income Data:

      

Sales

   $ 3,342,804      $ 3,243,987      $ 3,090,542   

Cost of products sold

     2,755,691        2,734,558        2,617,804   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     587,113        509,429        472,738   

Selling, administration & engineering expenses

     329,922        301,724        293,446   

Amortization of intangibles

     13,892        16,437        15,431   

Impairment charges

     21,611        26,273          

Restructuring charges

     53,844        17,414        21,720   

Other operating profit

     (8,033     (16,927       
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating profit

     175,877        164,508        142,141   

Interest expense, net of interest income

     (38,331     (45,604     (54,921

Equity earnings

     5,683        6,037        11,070   

Other income (expense), net

     9,759        (36,658     (7,437
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     152,988        88,283        90,853   

Income tax expense

     41,218        42,810        45,599   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     111,770        45,473        45,254   

Net loss (income) attributable to noncontrolling interests

     110        (2,694     2,687   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

   $ 111,880      $ 42,779      $ 47,941   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income available to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. common stockholders

   $ 111,880      $ 42,779      $ 35,054   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings Per Share:

      

Basic

   $ 6.50      $ 2.56      $ 2.39   

Diluted

   $ 6.08      $ 2.39      $ 2.24   

Statements of Cash Flows Data:

      

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 270,385      $ 171,049      $ 133,257   

Net cash used in investing activities

   $ (166,394   $ (157,396   $ (191,084

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

   $ (11,590   $ 49,411      $ (23,047

 



 

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     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015     2014     2013  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Balance Sheet Data (as of period end):

      

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 378,243      $ 267,270      $ 184,370   

Net working capital(1)

     175,312        294,315        269,120   

Total assets

     2,304,292        2,125,630        2,102,754   

Total debt(2)

     777,912        778,737        684,424   

Total equity

     614,799        548,714        615,572   

Other Financial Data:

      

EBITDA(3)

   $ 305,856      $ 243,773      $ 259,489   

Adjusted EBITDA(3)

     362,365        311,537        287,367   

Adjusted EBITDA Margin(3)

     10.8     9.6     9.3

Adjusted Net Income(3)

   $ 8,697      $ 85,994        N/A   

Capital expenditures.

     166,267        192,089      $ 183,336   

Free Cash Flow(3)

     104,118        (21,040     (50,079

 

(1) Net working capital is defined as current assets (excluding cash and cash equivalents) less current liabilities (excluding debt payable in one year).
(2) Total debt includes term loans, capital lease obligations and other third-party debt, as applicable.
(3) We define EBITDA as net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc., plus income tax expense, interest expense, net of interest income, and depreciation and other amortization. We define Adjusted EBITDA as EBITDA, as further adjusted to exclude restructuring, impairment charges, gain on remeasurement of previously held equity interest, gain on divestitures, loss on extinguishments of debt, amortization of inventory write-ups, settlement charges, stock-based compensation, acquisition costs and other expenses that management does not consider to be reflective of our core operating performance. We describe these adjustments reconciling net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. to Adjusted EBITDA in the table below. Adjusted EBITDA Margin is calculated by dividing Adjusted EBITDA by sales for each period.

We define Adjusted Net Income as net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc., plus restructuring expenses (net of tax), impairment charges (net of tax), (gain) loss on divestitures (net of tax), loss on extinguishments of debt and other unusual, non-cash or non-recurring items that management does not consider to be reflective of our core operating performance. We describe these adjustments reconciling net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. to Adjusted Net Income in the table below. We define Free Cash Flow as net cash provided by operating activities, minus capital expenditures.

We present EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow because we believe they are useful indicators of our operating performance. Our management uses EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA Margin principally as measures of our operating performance and also:

 

    because similar measures are utilized in the calculation of the financial covenants and ratios contained in our financing arrangements;

 

    in developing our internal budgets and forecasts;

 

    as a significant factor in evaluating our management for compensation purposes;

 

    in evaluating potential acquisitions;

 

    in comparing our current operating results with corresponding historical periods and with the operational performance of other companies in our industry; and

 



 

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    in presentations to the members of our Board of Directors to enable our Board of Directors to have the same measurement basis of operating performance as is used by management in their assessments of performance and in forecasting and budgeting for our company.

Our management also believes that EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow are useful to investors because they are frequently used by analysts, investors and other interested parties to evaluate companies in our industry.

EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow are non-GAAP financial measures and should not be considered as an alternative to net income, operating profit or as a measure of financial performance or cash flows from operating activities as a measure of liquidity, or any other performance measure derived in accordance with GAAP and they should not be construed as an inference that our future results will be unaffected by unusual or non-recurring items. In evaluating EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, and Adjusted Net Income, you should be aware that in the future we may incur expenses that are the same as or similar to some of the adjustments in this presentation. Our presentation of Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, and Adjusted Net Income should not be construed to imply that our future results will be unaffected by any such adjustments. Management compensates for these limitations by primarily relying on our GAAP results in addition to using EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow supplementally.

Our EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow measures have limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider them in isolation, or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP. Some of the limitations of EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow are:

 

    EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, and Adjusted Net Income do not reflect costs or cash outlays for capital expenditures or contractual commitments;

 

    they do not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs;

 

    they do not reflect the interest expense, or the cash requirements necessary to service interest or principal payments, on our debt;

 

    they do not reflect period to period changes in taxes, income tax expense or the cash necessary to pay income taxes;

 

    they do not reflect the impact of earnings or charges resulting from matters we consider not to be indicative of our ongoing operations;

 

    although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized will often have to be replaced in the future, and EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA Margin do not reflect cash requirements for such replacements;

 

    and other companies in our industry may calculate these measures differently than we do, limiting their usefulness as comparative measures.

Because of these limitations, EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA Margin, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow should not be considered as measures of discretionary cash available to invest in business growth or to reduce indebtedness.

 



 

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The following table provides a reconciliation of net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA for the periods presented.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015      2014      2013  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

   $ 111,880       $ 42,779       $ 47,941   

Income tax expense

     41,218         42,810         45,599   

Interest expense, net of interest income

     38,331         45,604         54,921   

Depreciation and amortization

     114,427         112,580         111,028   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

EBITDA

   $ 305,856       $ 243,773       $ 259,489   

Restructuring(1)

     53,844         17,188         21,192   

Impairment charges(2)

     21,611         26,273           

Gain on remeasurement of previously held equity interest(3)

     (14,199                

Gain on divestiture(4)

     (8,033      (14,568        

Loss on extinguishment of debt(5)

             30,488           

Amortization of inventory write-up(6)

     1,419                   

Settlement charges(7)

             3,637           

Stock-based compensation(8)

     (71      2,770         5,225   

Acquisition costs

     1,637         740         946   

Other

     301         1,236         515   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ 362,365       $ 311,537       $ 287,367   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  (1) Includes non-cash restructuring and is net of non-controlling interest.
  (2) Impairment charges in 2015 related to fixed assets of $13.6 million and intangible assets of $8.0 million. Impairment charges in 2014 related to fixed assets of $24.6 million and intangible assets of $1.7 million.
  (3) Gain on remeasurement of previously held equity interest in Shenya.
  (4) Gain on sale of hard coat plastic exterior trim business in 2015 and thermal and emissions product line in 2014.
  (5) Loss on extinguishment of debt relating to the repurchase of our 8 12% Senior Notes due 2018, or Senior Notes, and 7 38% Senior PIK Toggle Notes due 2018, or Senior PIK Toggle Notes.
  (6) Amortization of write-up of inventory to fair value for the Shenya acquisition.
  (7) Settlement charges relating to the U.S. pension plans that were amended to offer a one-time voluntary lump sum window to certain terminated vested participants.
  (8) Non-cash stock amortization expense and non-cash stock option expense for grants issued at emergence from bankruptcy.

 



 

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The following table provides a reconciliation of net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. to Adjusted Net Income for the periods presented.

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
 
     2015      2014(1)  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

   $ 111,880       $ 42,779   

Restructuring expense (net of tax)

     52,027         17,301   

Impairment charges (net of tax)

     21,611         19,945   

(Gain) Loss on divestiture (net of tax)

     (16,821      (12,810

Loss on extinguishment of debt

             18,779   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted Net Income

   $ 168,697       $ 85,994   

 

(1) The Company did not calculate Adjusted Net Income prior to 2014.

The following table provides a reconciliation of net cash provided by the operating activities to Free Cash Flow for the periods presented.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015      2014      2013  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 270,385       $ 171,049       $ 133,257   

Capital expenditures

     (166,267      (192,089      (183,336
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Free Cash Flow

   $ 104,118       $ (21,040    $ (50,079

 



 

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should consider carefully the risks and uncertainties described below and the accompanying prospectus and other information contained in or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus, including our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes, before you decide whether to purchase our common stock. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and prospects could be materially and adversely affected. As a result, the trading price of our common stock could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment in our common stock.

Risks Related to Our Business

We are highly dependent on the automotive industry. A prolonged or material contraction in automotive sales and production volumes could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Automotive sales and production are cyclical and depend on, among other things, general economic conditions and consumer spending, vehicle demand and preferences (which can be affected by a number of factors, including fuel costs, employment levels and the availability of consumer financing). As the volume of automotive production fluctuates, the demand for our products also fluctuates. Prolonged or material contraction in automotive sales and production volume could cause our customers to reduce orders of our products, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In addition, our liquidity could be adversely impacted if our customers were to extend their normal payment terms. Likewise, if our suppliers were to reduce normal trade credit terms, our liquidity could be adversely impacted. If either of these situations occurs, we may need to rely on other sources of funding to bridge the additional gap between the time we pay our suppliers and the time we receive corresponding payments from our customers.

Escalating pricing pressures may adversely affect our business.

Pricing pressure in the automotive supply industry has been substantial and is likely to continue. Nearly all vehicle manufacturers seek price reductions in both the initial bidding process and during the term of the contract. Price reductions have adversely impacted our sales and profit margins and are expected to do so in the future. If we are not able to offset continued price reductions through improved operating efficiencies and reduced expenditures, those price reductions may have a negative impact on our financial condition.

Our business could be adversely affected if we lose any of our largest customers or significant platforms.

While we provide parts to virtually every major global OEMs for use on a multitude of different platforms, sales to our three largest customers, Ford, GM, and FCA, on a worldwide basis represented approximately 54% of our sales for the year ended December 31, 2015. Our ability to reduce the risks inherent in certain concentrations of business will depend, in part, on our ability to continue to diversify our sales on a customer, product, platform and geographic basis. Although business with each customer is typically split among numerous contracts, the loss of a major customer, significant reduction in purchases of our products by such customer, or any discontinuance or resourcing of a significant platform could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

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We operate in a highly competitive industry and efforts by our competitors to gain market share could adversely affect our financial performance.

The automotive parts industry is highly competitive. We face numerous competitors in each of our product lines. In general, there are three or more significant competitors and numerous smaller competitors for most of the products we offer. We also face competition for certain of our products from suppliers producing in lower-cost regions such as Asia and Eastern Europe. Our competitors’ efforts to grow market share could exert downward pressure on the pricing of our products and our margins.

Increases in the costs, or reduced availability of, raw materials and manufactured components may adversely affect our profitability.

Raw material costs can be volatile. The principal raw materials we purchase include ethylene propylene diene monomer M-Class rubber, or EPDM, and synthetic rubber, components manufactured from carbon steel, plastic resins, carbon black, process oils, components manufactured from aluminum and natural rubber. Raw materials are the largest component of our costs, representing approximately 50% of our total cost of products sold in 2015. The availability of raw materials and manufactured components can fluctuate due to factors beyond our control. A significant increase in the price of these items, or a restriction in their availability, could materially increase our operating costs and adversely affect our profitability because it is generally difficult to pass through these increased costs to our customers.

Disruptions in the supply chain could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We obtain components and other products and services from numerous suppliers and other vendors throughout the world. We are responsible for managing our supply chain, including suppliers that may be the sole sources of products that we require, that our customers direct us to use or that have unique capabilities that would make it difficult and/or expensive to re-source. In certain instances, entire industries may experience short-term capacity constraints. Any significant disruption could adversely affect our financial performance. Furthermore, unfavorable economic or industry conditions could result in financial distress within our supply base, thereby increasing the risk of supply disruption. Although market conditions generally have improved in recent years, uncertainty remains, and another economic downturn or other unfavorable industry conditions in one or more of the regions in which we operate could cause a supply disruption and thereby adversely affect our financial condition, operating results and cash flows.

If a customer experiences a material supply shortage, either directly or as a result of a supply shortage at another supplier, that customer may halt or limit the purchase of our products, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to other risks associated with our international operations.

We have significant manufacturing operations outside the United States, including joint ventures and other alliances. Our operations are located in 20 countries, and we export to several other countries. In 2015, approximately 73% of our sales were attributable to products manufactured outside the United States. Risks inherent in our international operations include:

 

    currency exchange rate fluctuations, currency controls and restrictions, and the ability to hedge currencies;

 

    changes in local economic conditions;

 

    repatriation restrictions or requirements, including tax increases on remittances and other payments by our foreign subsidiaries;

 

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    global sovereign fiscal uncertainty and hyperinflation in certain foreign countries;

 

    changes in laws and regulations, including export and import restrictions and the imposition of embargos;

 

    exposure to possible expropriation or other government actions; and

 

    exposure to local political or social unrest including resultant acts of war, terrorism, or similar events.

Expanding our sales and manufacturing operations in the Asia Pacific region, particularly in China, is an integral part of our strategy, and, as a result, our exposure to the risks described above is substantial. The occurrence of any of these risks may adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition of our international operations and our business as a whole.

Foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations could materially impact our operating results.

Our sales and manufacturing operations outside the United States expose us to currency risks. Our sales and earnings denominated in foreign currencies are translated into U.S. dollars for our consolidated financial statements. This translation is calculated based on average exchange rates during the reporting period. Our reported international sales and earnings could be adversely impacted in periods of a strengthening U.S. dollar.

Although we generally produce in the same geographic region as our products are sold, we also produce in countries that predominately sell in another currency. Some of our commodities are purchased in or tied to the U.S. dollar; therefore our earnings could be adversely impacted during the periods of a strengthening U.S. dollar relative to other foreign currencies. We employ financial instruments to hedge certain portions of our foreign currency exposures. However, this will not completely insulate us from the effects of currency fluctuation.

A portion of our operations are conducted by joint ventures which have unique risks.

Certain of our operations are carried on by joint ventures. In joint ventures, we share the management of the company with one or more partners who may not have the same goals, resources or priorities as we do. The operations of our joint ventures are subject to agreements with our partners, which typically include additional organizational formalities as well as requirements to share information and decision making, and may also limit our ability to sell our interest. Additional risks include one or more partners failing to satisfy contractual obligations, a change in ownership of any of our partners and our limited ability to control our partners’ compliance with applicable laws, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Any such occurrences could adversely affect our financial condition, operating results, cash flow or reputation.

Our capital structure includes a substantial amount of indebtedness, which imposes demands on our liquidity that could have an adverse effect on our financial condition or on our ability to obtain financing in the future.

As of December 31, 2015, we had approximately $777.9 million of outstanding indebtedness, including our $750 million senior term loan facility, or the Term Loan Facility, our $180 million senior asset-based revolving credit facility, or Senior ABL Facility, and the debt of certain foreign subsidiaries, which requires principal and interest payments. We are permitted by the terms of the Term Loan Facility and our Senior ABL Facility to incur additional indebtedness, subject to the restrictions therein, which could:

 

    make it more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations under the Term Loan Facility and the Senior ABL facility;

 

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    increase our vulnerability to adverse economic and general industry conditions, including interest rate fluctuations, since the majority of our borrowings are at variable rates of interest; and

 

    increase our cost of borrowing.

Our ability to make scheduled payments on our debt or to refinance these obligations depends on our financial condition and operating performance. If our cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we may be forced to reduce or delay investments and capital expenditures, sell material assets, seek additional capital or restructure or refinance our indebtedness, which could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The Term Loan Facility and the Senior ABL Facility impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us and our subsidiaries.

The Term Loan Facility and the Senior ABL Facility limit our ability, among other things, to:

 

    incur additional indebtedness or issue certain disqualified stock and preferred stock;

 

    pay dividends or certain other distributions on our capital stock or repurchase our capital stock;

 

    make certain investments or other restricted payments;

 

    enter into certain restrictive agreements;

 

    engage in transactions with affiliates;

 

    sell certain assets or merge with or into other companies;

 

    guarantee indebtedness; and

 

    permit liens.

Moreover, our Senior ABL Facility provides the agent considerable discretion to impose reserves, which could materially reduce the amount of borrowings that would otherwise be available to us.

As a result of these covenants and restrictions (including borrowing base availability), we are limited in how we conduct our business, and we may be unable to raise additional debt or equity financing to compete effectively or to take advantage of new business opportunities or acquisitions. A breach of any of these covenants could result in a default under the Senior ABL Facility and under the Term Loan Facility. The terms of any future indebtedness we may incur could include more restrictive covenants. We cannot assure that we will be able to maintain compliance with these covenants in the future and, if we fail to do so, that we will be able to obtain waivers from the lenders under the Senior ABL Facility and the Term Loan Facility and/or amend the covenants in such agreements.

Our pension plans are currently underfunded, and we may have to make cash payments to the plans, reducing the cash available for our business.

We sponsor various pension plans worldwide that are underfunded and will require cash payments. Additionally, if the performance of the assets in our pension plans does not meet our expectations, or if other actuarial assumptions are modified, our required contributions may be higher than we expect. As of December 31, 2015, our net underfunded status was $173.3 million. If our cash flow from operations is insufficient to fund our worldwide pension liabilities, it could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Significant changes in discount rates, the actual return on pension assets and other factors could adversely affect our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition.

Our earnings may be positively or negatively impacted by the amount of income or expense recorded related to our pension plans. Generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, or U.S. GAAP, require that income or expense related to the pension plans be calculated at the annual measurement date using actuarial calculations, which reflect certain assumptions. Because these assumptions have fluctuated and will continue to fluctuate in response to changing market conditions, the amount of gains or losses that will be recognized in subsequent periods, the impact on the funded status of the pension plans and the future minimum required contributions, if any, could adversely affect our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition.

The benefits of our continuous improvement program and other cost savings plans may not be fully realized.

Our operations strategy includes continuous improvement programs and implementation of lean manufacturing tools across all facilities to achieve cost savings and increased performance. We have and may continue to initiate restructuring actions designed to improve future profitability and competitiveness. We have disclosed that we aim to achieve $100 million of cost savings in 2016 from these initiatives. Our expectations may not be achieved on schedule or at the level we anticipate. If we are unable to realize these anticipated savings, our operating results and financial condition may be adversely affected.

We may incur significant costs related to manufacturing facility closings or consolidation which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

We are seeking to reduce the cost of our manufacturing and operations, and may reduce utilization of or close or consolidate manufacturing locations. The exit costs associated with such actions, including employee termination costs, may be significant. These or future costs could negatively affect our cash flows, results of operations and financial condition.

Our inability to effectively manage the timing, quality and costs of new program launches could adversely affect our financial performance.

In connection with the award of new business, we may obligate ourselves to deliver new products that are subject to our customers’ timing, performance and quality standards. Given the number and complexity of new program launches, we may experience difficulties managing product quality, timeliness and associated costs. In addition, new program launches require a significant ramp up of costs. However, our sales related to these new programs generally are dependent upon the timing and success of our customers’ introduction of new vehicles. Our inability to effectively manage the timing, quality and costs of these new program launches could adversely affect our financial condition, operating results and cash flows.

Our success depends in part on our development of improved products, and our efforts may fail to meet the needs of customers on a timely or cost-effective basis.

Our continued success depends on our ability to maintain advanced technological capabilities and knowledge necessary to adapt to changing market demands as well as to develop and commercialize innovative products. We may be unable to develop new products successfully or to keep pace with technological developments by our competitors and the industry in general. In addition, we may develop specific technologies and capabilities in anticipation of customers’ demands for new innovations and technologies. If such demand does not materialize, we may be unable to recover the costs incurred in such programs. If we are unable to recover these costs or if any such programs do not progress as expected, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

 

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Any acquisitions or divestitures we make may be unsuccessful, may take longer than anticipated or may negatively impact our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may pursue acquisitions or divestitures in the future as part of our strategy. Acquisitions and divestitures involve numerous risks, including identifying attractive target acquisitions, undisclosed risks affecting the target, difficulties integrating acquired businesses, the assumption of unknown liabilities, potential adverse effects on existing customer or supplier relationships, and the diversion of management’s attention from day-to-day business. We may not have, or be able to raise on acceptable terms, sufficient financial resources to make acquisitions. Our ability to make investments may also be limited by the terms of our existing or future financing arrangements. Any acquisitions or divestitures we pursue may not be successful or prove to be beneficial to our operations and cash flow.

We may incur material losses and costs as a result of product liability and warranty and recall claims that may be brought against us.

We may be exposed to product liability and warranty claims in the event that our products actually or allegedly fail to perform as expected or the use of our products results, or is alleged to result, in bodily injury and/or property damage. Accordingly, we could experience material warranty or product liability expenses in the future and incur significant costs to defend against these claims. In addition, if any of our products are, or are alleged to be, defective, we may be required to participate in a recall of that product if the defect or the alleged defect relates to automotive safety. Product recalls could cause us to incur material costs and could harm our reputation or cause us to lose customers, particularly if any such recall causes customers to question the safety or reliability of our products. Also, while we possess considerable historical warranty and recall data with respect to the products we currently produce, we do not have such data relating to new products, assembly programs or technologies, including any new fuel and emissions technology and systems being brought into production, to allow us to accurately estimate future warranty or recall costs.

In addition, the increased focus on systems integration platforms utilizing fuel and emissions technology with more sophisticated components from multiple sources could result in an increased risk of component warranty costs over which we have little or no control and for which we may be subject to an increasing share of liability to the extent any of the other component suppliers are in financial distress or are otherwise incapable of fulfilling their warranty or product recall obligations. Our costs associated with providing product warranties and responding to product recall claims could be material, and we do not have insurance covering product recalls. Product liability, warranty and recall costs may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to a broad range of environmental, health and safety laws and regulations which could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

We are subject to a broad range of laws and regulations governing emissions to air; discharges to water; noise and odor emissions; the generation, handling, storage, transportation, treatment, reclamation and disposal of chemicals and waste materials; the cleanup of contaminated properties; and health and safety. We may incur substantial costs in complying with, or as a result of violations of or liabilities under, these laws and regulations. Some of our current and former facilities have been subject to certain environmental investigations and remediation activities. Although we maintain environmental reserves for certain of these sites, these remediation costs are difficult to accurately predict and the ultimate remediation costs at these or other sites could exceed current estimates. Through various acquisitions, we have acquired a number of manufacturing facilities, and predecessor entities we have acquired may have a long history of industrial and commercial operations. As a result, we cannot assure that we will not incur material costs or liabilities relating to activities that predate our ownership or that relate to the operations of predecessor entities. Material future expenditures may be

 

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necessary if compliance standards change or material unknown conditions that require remediation are discovered. Environmental laws could also restrict our ability to expand our facilities or could require us to acquire costly equipment or to incur other significant expenses. If we fail to comply with present and future environmental laws and regulations, we could be subject to future liabilities, which could adversely affect our financial condition, operating results and cash flows.

Work stoppages or similar difficulties could disrupt our operations and negatively affect our operations and financial performance.

We may be subject to work stoppages and may be affected by other labor disputes. A number of our collective bargaining agreements expire in any given year. There is no certainty that we will be successful in negotiating new agreements with these unions that extend beyond the current expiration dates or that these new agreements will be on terms as favorable to us as past labor agreements. Failure to renew these agreements when they expire or to establish new collective bargaining agreements on terms acceptable to us and the unions could result in work stoppages or other labor disruptions which may have an adverse effect on our operations, customer relationships and financial results. Additionally, a work stoppage at one or more of our suppliers or our customers’ suppliers could adversely affect our operations if an alternative source of supply were not readily available. Work stoppages by our customers’ employees could result in reduced demand for our products and could have an adverse effect on our business. As of December 31, 2015, approximately 28% of our employees were represented by unions, and approximately 9% of the unionized employees were located in the United States. In addition, it is possible that our workforce will become more unionized in the future. Unionization activities could increase our costs, which could negatively affect our profitability.

If we are unable to protect our intellectual property or if a third party challenges our intellectual property rights, our business could be adversely affected.

We own or have rights to proprietary technology that is important to our business. We rely on intellectual property laws, patents, trademarks and trade secrets to protect such technology. Such protections, however, vary among the countries in which we market and sell our products, and as a result, we may be unable to prevent third parties from using our intellectual property without authorization. Any infringement or misappropriation of our technology could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations. We also face exposure to claims by others for infringement of intellectual property rights and could incur significant costs or losses related to such claims. In addition, many of our supply agreements require us to indemnify our customers from third-party infringement claims. These claims, regardless of their merit or resolution, are frequently costly to prosecute, defend or settle and divert the efforts and attention of our management and employees. If any such claim were to result in an adverse outcome, we could be required to take actions which may include: ceasing the manufacture, use or sale of the infringing products; paying substantial damages to third parties, including to customers to compensate them for the discontinued use of a product or to replace infringing technology with non-infringing technology; or expending significant resources to develop or license non-infringing products, any of which could adversely affect our operations, business and financial condition.

A disruption in, or the inability to successfully implement upgrades to, our information technology systems, including disruptions relating to cybersecurity, could adversely affect our business and financial performance.

We rely upon information technology networks, systems and processes to manage and support our business. We have implemented a number of procedures and practices designed to protect against breaches or failures of our systems. Despite the security measures that we have implemented, including those measures to prevent cyber-attacks, our systems could be breached or damaged by

 

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computer viruses or unauthorized physical or electronic access. A breach of our information technology systems could result in theft of our intellectual property, disruption to business or unauthorized access to customer or personal information. Such a breach could adversely impact our operations and/or our reputation and may cause us to incur significant time and expense to cure or remediate the breach.

Further, we continually update and expand our information technology systems to enable us to more efficiently run our business. If these systems are not implemented successfully, our operations and business could be disrupted and our ability to report accurate and timely financial results could be adversely effected.

Changes to U.S.-EU data transfer regulations could adversely affect our financial condition and operating ability.

On October 6, 2015, the European Court of Justice issued a judgment declaring as invalid the European Commission’s Decision on the adequacy of the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework. After extended negotiations, the European Commission and the U.S. Department of Commerce agreed on a new framework for transatlantic exchanges of personal data for commercial purposes: the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield. The new arrangement provides stronger obligations on companies in the U.S. to protect the personal data of Europeans. We may incur costs in complying with the new framework. The new regulations may also impose new restrictions on our internal operations. If we fail to comply with the new regulations, we could be subject to future liabilities, which could adversely affect our financial condition and operating ability.

Our expected annual effective tax rate could be volatile and could materially change as a result of changes in many items including mix of earnings, debt and capital structure and other factors.

Many items could impact our effective tax rate including changes in our debt and capital structure, mix of earnings and many other factors. Our overall effective tax rate is based upon the consolidated tax expense as a percentage of consolidated earnings before tax. However, tax expenses and benefits are not recognized on a consolidated or global basis, but rather on a jurisdictional, legal entity basis. Further, certain jurisdictions in which we operate generate losses where no current financial statement benefit is realized. In addition, certain jurisdictions have statutory rates greater than or less than the United States statutory rate. As such, changes in the mix and source of earnings between jurisdictions could have a significant impact on our overall effective tax rate in future years. Changes in rules related to accounting for income taxes, changes in tax laws and rates or adverse outcomes from tax audits that occur regularly in any of our jurisdictions could also have a significant impact on our overall effective tax rate in future periods.

Impairment charges relating to our goodwill, long-lived assets or intangible assets could adversely affect our results of operations.

We regularly monitor our goodwill, long-lived assets and intangible assets for impairment indicators. In conducting our goodwill impairment testing, we compare the fair value of each of our reporting units to the related net book value. In conducting our impairment analysis of long-lived and intangible assets, we compare the undiscounted cash flows expected to be generated from the long-lived or intangible assets to the related net book values. Changes in economic or operating conditions impacting our estimates and assumptions could result in the impairment of our goodwill, long-lived assets or intangible assets. In the event that we determine that our goodwill, long-lived assets or intangible assets are impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

 

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We operate as a holding company and depend on our subsidiaries for cash to satisfy the obligations of the holding company.

Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. is a holding company. Our subsidiaries conduct all of our operations and own substantially all of our assets. Our cash flow and our ability to meet our obligations depend on the cash flow of our subsidiaries. In addition, the payment of funds in the form of dividends, intercompany payments, tax sharing payments and otherwise may be subject to restrictions under the laws of the countries of incorporation of our subsidiaries or the by-laws of the subsidiary.

Risks Related to this Offering and Ownership of Our Common Stock

The market price of shares of our common stock may be volatile, and you may not be able to resell shares of our common stock at or above the price you paid or at all, and you could lose all or part of your investment as a result.

The market price of our common stock may be highly volatile and could be subject to wide fluctuations. Securities markets worldwide experience significant price and volume fluctuations. This market volatility, as well as general economic, market or political conditions, could reduce the market price of shares of our common stock in spite of our operating performance. The trading price of our common stock may be adversely affected due to a number of factors, most of which we cannot predict or control, such as those listed under “—Risks Related to Our Business” and the following:

 

    results of operations that vary from our expectations and the expectations of securities analysts and investors;

 

    our lack of visibility into near-term results of operations and difficulty in accurately forecasting our quarterly results;

 

    results of operations that vary from those of our competitors;

 

    changes in expectations as to our future financial performance, including financial estimates and investment recommendations by securities analysts and investors;

 

    fluctuations in the market prices of stocks generally, or those of companies in our industry;

 

    strategic actions by us or our competitors;

 

    announcements by us or our competitors of significant contracts, new products, acquisitions, joint marketing relationships, joint ventures, other strategic relationships or capital commitments;

 

    failure of any of our initiatives to achieve commercial success;

 

    changes in general economic or market conditions or trends in our industry or markets;

 

    changes in business, legal or regulatory conditions in the United States or other countries;

 

    future sales of our common stock or other securities and the timing and amount of any share repurchases we make pursuant to our newly announced plan or otherwise;

 

    investor perceptions or the investment opportunity associated with our common stock relative to other investment alternatives;

 

    the public’s response to press releases or other public announcements by us or third parties, including our filings with the SEC;

 

    announcements relating to litigation or governmental investigations;

 

    guidance, if any, that we provide to the public, any change in this guidance or our failure to meet this guidance;

 

    the development and sustainability of an active trading market for our stock;

 

    additions or departures of any of our key personnel;

 

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    changes in accounting principles or policies;

 

    adverse publicity about the industries we participate in or individual scandals; and

 

    other events or factors, including those resulting from natural disasters, war, acts of terrorism or responses to these events.

You may be unable to resell your shares of common stock at or above the public offering price. In addition, price volatility may be greater if the public float and trading volume of our common stock is low.

In the past few years, stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. In the past, following periods of volatility in the overall market and the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been instituted against these companies. This litigation, if instituted against us, could result in substantial costs and a diversion of our management’s attention and resources.

Because we have no current plans to pay cash dividends on our common stock, you may not receive any return on investment unless you sell your common stock for a price greater than that which you paid for it.

We have no current plans to pay dividends on our common stock. The declaration, amount and payment of any future dividends on shares of common stock will be at the sole discretion of our Board of Directors. Our Board of Directors may take into account general and economic conditions, our financial condition and results of operations, our available cash and current and anticipated cash needs, capital requirements, contractual, legal, tax and regulatory restrictions and implications on the payment of dividends by us to our stockholders or by our subsidiaries to us and such other factors as our Board of Directors may deem relevant. In addition, our ability to pay dividends will be limited by our Term Loan Facility and Senior ABL Facility and may be limited by covenants of other indebtedness we or our subsidiaries incur in the future. As a result, you may not receive any return on an investment in our common stock unless you sell our common stock for a price greater than that which you paid for it.

If securities analysts do not publish research or reports about our business or if they downgrade our stock or our industry, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock relies in part on the research and reports that industry or financial analysts publish about us or our business or industry. We do not control these analysts. Furthermore, if one or more of the analysts who do cover us downgrade our stock or our industry, or the stock of any of our competitors, or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, the price of our stock could decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of us or fail to publish reports on us regularly, we could lose visibility in the market, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

Future sales, or the perception of future sales, by us or our stockholders in the public market following this offering could cause the market price for our common stock to decline.

The sale of substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market, or the perception that such sales could occur, could substantially decrease the market price of shares of our common stock. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate. Upon completion of this offering and the share purchase, we will have a total of                      shares of our common stock outstanding. Of the outstanding shares, the                      shares sold in this offering and not purchased by us (or                      shares if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full) will be freely tradable without restriction or further registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act.

 

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In connection with this offering, we, certain of our executive officers, directors and the selling stockholders will sign lock-up agreements with the underwriters of this offering that, subject to certain customary exceptions (which exceptions include issuance of common stock by us in connection with acquisitions, licenses, business combinations, joint ventures, commercial relationships or other strategic transactions; provided that the aggregate number of shares issued or issuable in connection therewith does not exceed 10% of the number of shares of common stock outstanding immediately after this offering and the recipient thereof agrees to be bound by the terms of the lockup), restrict the sale of the shares of our common stock and certain other securities held by them for 90 days following the date of this prospectus supplement. Goldman, Sachs & Co. may, in its sole discretion and without notice, release all or any portion of the shares of common stock and certain other securities subject to lock-up agreements. See “Underwriting” for a description of these lock-up agreements. Upon the expiration of these lock-up agreements, all of the 8,066,099 shares (or 7,766,100 shares if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full) held by the signatories will be eligible for resale in the public market, subject, in the case of shares held by our affiliates, to volume, manner of sale and other limitations under Rule 144 under the Securities Act if such sales are being made pursuant to Rule 144. Certain of our stockholders may be considered affiliates at the expiration of the lock-up period.

In addition, we registered 15,528,849 shares of our common stock to be offered by certain of our stockholders under a registration statement declare effective as of August 26, 2011 pursuant to the Securities Act, of which this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus is a part, and registered 3,548,904 shares of our common stock to be offered by certain of our stockholders under a registration statement filed subsequently declared effective as of August 14, 2013. A sale of a large number of shares under such registration statements could cause the prevailing market price of our common stock to decline. Following completion of this offering and share purchase, the shares registered for resale pursuant to the registration statements would represent approximately     % of our outstanding common stock (or     % if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares).

Pursuant to a registration rights agreement, we have granted certain of our stockholders the right to cause us, in certain instances, at our expense, to file registration statements under the Securities Act, covering resales of our common stock held by them, and conduct certain offerings thereunder. If these stockholders exercise their registration rights, the market price of our common stock could decline.

In addition, 1,216,409 shares of common stock are eligible for sale upon exercise of options. We have filed a registration statement on Form S-8 under the Securities Act to register all shares of common stock subject to outstanding stock options and the shares of common stock subject to issuance under the 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan. The Form S-8 registration statement automatically became effective upon filing. The initial registration statement on Form S-8 covered 1,940,741 shares of common stock and a subsequent registration statement on Form S-8 covered an additional 3,272,834 shares of common stock. These shares can be sold in the public market upon issuance, subject to restrictions under the securities laws applicable to resales by affiliates.

As restrictions on resale end, the market price of our shares of common stock could drop significantly if the holders of these restricted shares sell them or are perceived by the market as intending to sell them. These factors could also make it more difficult for us to raise additional funds through future offerings of our shares of common stock or other securities.

In the future, we may also issue our securities in connection with investments or acquisitions. The amount of shares of our common stock issued in connection with an investment or acquisition could constitute a material portion of our then-outstanding shares of our common stock. Any issuance of securities in connection with investments or acquisitions may result in dilution to you.

 

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A substantial portion of our total outstanding shares are held by a small number of investors who may, individually or collectively, exert significant control over us.

Certain stockholders, including the selling stockholders after this offering, own a substantial portion of our outstanding common stock. As long as such major stockholders (whether or not acting in a coordinated manner) and any other substantial stockholder own, directly or indirectly, a substantial portion of our outstanding shares, they will be able to exert significant influence over matters requiring stockholder approval, including the composition of our Board of Directors. Further, to the extent that the substantial stockholders were to act in concert, they could potentially control any action taken by our stockholders.

The concentration of ownership of our outstanding equity in such major stockholders may make some transactions more difficult or impossible without the support of such stockholders or more likely with the support of such stockholders. The interests of any of such stockholders, any other substantial stockholder or any of their respective affiliates could conflict with or differ from the interests of our other stockholders.

Anti-takeover provisions in our organizational documents and Delaware law might discourage or delay acquisition attempts for us that you might consider favorable.

Our Third Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws contain provisions that may have an anti-takeover effect and may delay, defer or prevent a merger, acquisition, tender offer, takeover attempt or other change of control transaction that a stockholder might consider in its best interest, including those attempts that might result in a premium over the market price for the shares held by our stockholders. These provisions, among other things:

 

    provide for the ability of our Board of Directors to issue one or more series of preferred stock;

 

    prohibit stockholder action by written consent, unless the action by written consent of the stockholders is approved in advance by a resolution of our Board of Directors or except as expressly provided by the terms of any series of preferred stock;

 

    impose certain limitations on convening special stockholder meetings;

 

    provide that the Board of Directors is expressly authorized to make, repeal, alter, amend or rescind our bylaws without the assent or vote of the stockholders, and any amendment, alteration, rescission or repeal of our bylaws by our stockholders will require the affirmative vote of the holders of at least a majority in voting power of all the then-outstanding shares of stock of the Company entitled to vote thereon, voting together as a single class; and

 

    establish advance notice requirements for nominations for elections to our Board of Directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by stockholders at stockholder meetings.

Further, as a Delaware corporation, we are governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which limits the ability of stockholders owning in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock to merge or combine with us. Although we believe these provisions collectively provide for an opportunity to obtain greater value for stockholders by requiring potential acquirers to negotiate with our Board of Directors, they would apply even if an offer rejected by our Board of Directors were considered beneficial by some stockholders. In addition, these provisions may frustrate or prevent any attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management by making it more difficult for stockholders to replace members of our Board of Directors, which is responsible for appointing the members of our management.

These anti-takeover provisions and other provisions under Delaware law could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of the Company, including actions that our stockholders may deem advantageous, or negatively affect the trading price of our common stock. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors of your choosing and to cause us to take other corporate actions you desire.

 

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus contain or incorporate by reference “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, that reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, our operations and financial performance. These forward-looking statements include statements concerning our plans, objectives, goals, strategies, future events, future revenue or performance, capital expenditures, financing needs, plans or intentions relating to acquisitions, business trends, and other information that is not historical information and, in particular, appear under “Business,” “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not historical facts. In some cases, you can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of words such as “outlook,” “believes,” “expects,” “potential,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “seeks,” “predicts,” “intends,” “plans,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “projects,” “forecasts” or the negative version of these words or other comparable words. All forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, management’s examination of historical operating trends and data are based upon our current expectations and various assumptions. Our expectations, beliefs, and projections are expressed in good faith and we believe there is a reasonable basis for them. However, we cannot assure you that these expectations, beliefs and projections will be achieved. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties that may cause actual outcomes, results or achievements to be materially different from the future results or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. We believe these factors include, but are not limited to, those described under “Risk Factors” included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus and the following risks, uncertainties and factors:

 

    high dependence on the automotive industry; prolonged or material contraction in automotive sales and production volumes could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition;

 

    escalating pricing pressures;

 

    loss of any of our largest customers or significant platforms;

 

    highly competitive industry and efforts by our competitors to gain market share;

 

    increases in the costs, or reduced availability of, raw materials and manufactured components;

 

    disruptions in the supply chain;

 

    other risks associated with our international operations;

 

    foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations;

 

    unique risks related to operations are conducted by joint ventures;

 

    our substantial indebtedness;

 

    the Term Loan Facility and the Senior ABL Facility impose significant operating and financial restrictions;

 

    our pension plans are currently underfunded, and we may have to make cash payments to the plans;

 

    significant changes in discount rates, the actual return on pension assets and other factors;

 

    benefits of our continuous improvement program and other cost savings plans may not be fully realized;

 

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    we may incur significant costs related to manufacturing facility closings or consolidation;

 

    our inability to effectively manage the timing, quality and costs of new program launches;

 

    development of improved products;

 

    any acquisitions or divestitures we make may be unsuccessful;

 

    material losses and costs as a result of product liability and warranty and recall claims that may be brought against us;

 

    broad range of environmental, health and safety laws and regulations;

 

    work stoppages or similar difficulties could disrupt our operations;

 

    our ability to protect our intellectual property or if a third party challenges our intellectual property rights;

 

    disruption in, or the inability to successfully implement upgrades to, our information technology systems, including disruptions relating to cybersecurity;

 

    changes to U.S. – E.U. data transfer regulations could adversely affect our financial condition and operating ability;

 

    our expected annual effective tax rate could be volatile;

 

    the possibility of future impairment charges to our goodwill and long-lived assets;

 

    dependence on our subsidiaries for cash to satisfy the obligations of the holding company; and

 

    the concentration of our stock ownership which may allow a few owners to exert significant control over us.

These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with the other cautionary statements that are included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. We operate in a very competitive and challenging environment. New risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all risks and uncertainties that could have an impact on the forward-looking statements contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. We cannot assure you that the results, events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or occur, and actual results, events, or circumstances could differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements.

The forward-looking statements made or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus relate only to events as of the date on which the statements are made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as required by law. We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. Our forward-looking statements do not reflect the potential impact of any future acquisitions, mergers, dispositions, joint ventures, investments or other strategic transactions we may make.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of our common stock by the selling stockholders, including any sales pursuant to the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares from the selling stockholders. For more information about the selling stockholders, see “Selling Stockholders.”

MARKET PRICE OF COMMON STOCK

Our common stock has been listed on the NYSE under the symbol “CPS” since October 17, 2013. Prior to our listing on the NYSE, our common stock was traded on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol “COSH” since May 25, 2010. Prior to that time, there was no public market for our common stock. The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low intra-day sale prices per share of our common stock as reported on the NYSE:

 

     High      Low  

2013

     

Fourth Quarter 2013 (from October 17, 2013)

   $ 56.85       $ 46.00   

2014

     

First Quarter 2014

   $ 71.11       $ 48.04   

Second Quarter 2014

   $ 70.79       $ 60.13   

Third Quarter 2014

   $ 66.64       $ 60.50   

Fourth Quarter 2014

   $ 62.18       $ 50.57   

2015

     

First Quarter 2015

   $ 59.90       $ 50.26   

Second Quarter 2015

   $ 64.83       $ 58.09   

Third Quarter 2015

   $ 67.54       $ 54.03   

Fourth Quarter 2015

   $ 80.63       $ 56.96   

2016

     

First Quarter 2016 (through March 11, 2016)

   $ 77.81       $ 63.01   

On March 11, 2016, the last reported sale price of our common stock on the NYSE was $77.60 per share. As of March 8, 2016, we had 4,287 holders of record of our common stock. The actual number of holders of common stock is greater than this number of record holders and includes stockholders who are beneficial owners, but whose shares are held in street name by brokers and nominees. The number of holders of record also does not include stockholders whose shares may be held in trust by other entities.

DIVIDEND POLICY

We have never paid or declared a dividend on our common stock and we have no current plan to pay dividends on our common stock. Any decision to declare and pay dividends in the future will be made at the sole discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, capital requirements, financial condition, contractual restrictions, restrictions in our debt agreements, general economic conditions, state law requirements and other factors that our Board of Directors may deem relevant. Additionally, our ability to declare and pay dividends also depends in part on our receipt of cash distributions from our operating subsidiaries, which may be restricted from distributing us cash as a result of the laws of their jurisdiction of organization, agreements of our subsidiaries or covenants under any existing and future outstanding indebtedness

 

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we or our subsidiaries incur. Our credit agreements governing our Senior ABL Facility and Term Loan Facility contain covenants that, among other things, restrict our ability to pay certain dividends and distributions subject to certain qualifications and limitations. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Financing Arrangements.”

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our cash and cash equivalents and capitalization as of December 31, 2015:

 

    on an actual basis; and

 

    on an as adjusted basis to give effect to the use of cash to fund the share purchase and the retirement of the Repurchased Shares.

You should read this table in conjunction with “Prospectus Supplement Summary — Share Repurchase Program and Concurrent Share Purchase”, “Selected Historical Financial Data” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Risk Factors” in this prospectus supplement and our audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto that are included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement.

 

     December 31, 2015  
     Actual      As Adjusted  
    

(dollars in thousands,
except share amounts)

 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 378,243       $ 353,243 (1) 
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Debt:

     

Term Loan Facility(2)

   $ 729,841       $ 729,841   

Other borrowings(3)

     48,071         48,071   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total debt

     777,912         777,912   

Equity:

     

Common shares, $0.001 par value, 190,000,000 shares authorized, 19,105,251 shares issued and 17,458,945 shares outstanding, actual; 18,783,087 shares issued and 17,136,781 shares outstanding, as adjusted(1)

     17         17   

Additional paid-in capital

     513,764        
513,764
  

Retained earnings

     306,713         281,713   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (217,065      (217,065
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. equity

     603,429         578,429   

Noncontrolling interests

     11,370         11,370   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total equity

     614,799         589,799   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total capitalization

   $ 1,392,711       $ 1,367,711   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) The as adjusted cash and cash equivalents and the as adjusted number of shares of common stock assume the purchase by us of $25 million of shares at the purchase price per share of $77.60, which is the last sale price of our common stock on the NYSE on March 11, 2016, or 322,164 shares, and that such shares are retired upon purchase by us. The actual number of shares to be purchased by us will depend on market conditions and other factors.
(2) The amount shown is net of approximately $6.1 million of unamortized issuance costs.
(3) Other borrowings reflect borrowings under capital leases, local bank lines and accounts receivable factoring sold with recourse classified in debt payable within one year on our consolidated balance sheet.

 

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SELECTED HISTORICAL FINANCIAL DATA

The following table shows selected historical consolidated financial and other data for Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. for the periods and as of the dates presented. The selected historical consolidated financial information as of December 31, 2015 and 2014 and for each of the three years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement. The selected historical consolidated financial information as of December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011 and for each of the two years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement.

You should read the following selected financial data together with the information under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Risk Factors” and our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement.

 

    Year Ended December 31,  
    2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  
    (dollars in thousands, except for share and
per share amounts)
 

Statements of Net Income Data:

         

Sales

  $ 3,342,804      $ 3,243,987      $ 3,090,542      $ 2,880,902      $ 2,853,509   

Cost of products sold

    2,755,691        2,734,558        2,617,804        2,442,014        2,402,920   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

    587,113        509,429        472,738        438,888        450,589   

Selling, administration & engineering expenses

    329,922        301,724        293,446        281,268        257,559   

Amortization of intangibles

    13,892        16,437        15,431        15,456        15,601   

Impairment charges

    21,611        26,273               10,069          

Restructuring charges

    53,844        17,414        21,720        28,763        52,206   

Other operating profit

    (8,033     (16,927                     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating profit

    175,877        164,508        142,141        103,332        125,223   

Interest expense, net of interest income.

    (38,331     (45,604     (54,921     (44,762     (40,559

Equity earnings.

    5,683        6,037        11,070        8,778        5,425   

Other income (expense), net.

    9,759        (36,658     (7,437     (63     7,174   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

    152,988        88,283        90,853        67,285        97,263   

Income tax expense

    41,218        42,810        45,599        (31,531     20,765   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

    111,770        45,473        45,254        98,816        76,498   

Net loss (income) attributable to noncontrolling interests

    110        (2,694     2,687        3,988        26,346   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

    111,880        42,779        47,941        102,804        102,844   

Net income available to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. common stockholders

    111,880        42,779        35,054        76,730        75,260   

Earnings Per Share:

         

Basic

  $ 6.50      $ 2.56      $ 2.39      $ 4.40      $ 4.27   

Diluted

  $ 6.08      $ 2.39      $ 2.24      $ 4.14      $ 3.93   

Statements of Cash Flows Data:

         

Net cash provided by operating activities.

  $ 270,385      $ 171,049      $ 133,257      $ 84,401      $ 172,339   

Net cash used in investing activities.

    (166,394     (157,396     (191,084     (117,570     (73,753

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities.

    (11,590     49,411        (23,047     (58,076     (24,584

Balance Sheet Data (as of period end):

         

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 378,243      $ 267,270      $ 184,370      $ 270,555      $ 361,745   

Net working capital(1)

    175,312        294,315        269,120        265,557        193,886   

Total assets

    2,304,292        2,125,630        2,102,754        2,025,977        2,003,788   

Total debt(2)

    777,912        778,737        684,424        483,365        488,652   

Total equity

    614,799        548,714        615,572        629,231        601,203   

 

(1) Net working capital is defined as current assets (excluding cash and cash equivalents) less current liabilities (excluding debt payable within one year).
(2) Total debt includes term loans, capital lease obligations and other third-party debt, as applicable.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

This management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is intended to assist in understanding and assessing the trends and significant changes in our results of operations and financial condition. Our historical results may not indicate, and should not be relied upon as an indication of, our future performance. Our forward-looking statements reflect our current views about future events, are based on assumptions and are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contemplated by these statements. See “Cautionary Statements Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” for a discussion of risks associated with reliance on forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause differences between actual results and those contemplated by forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those discussed below and elsewhere in this prospectus supplement, particularly in the section entitled “Risk Factors.” Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with “Selected Financial Data” and our audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement.

Company Overview

We are a leading manufacturer of sealing, fuel and brake delivery, fluid transfer and anti-vibration systems. Our products are primarily for use in passenger vehicles and light trucks that are manufactured by global automotive OEMs and replacement markets. We believe we are the largest global producer of sealing systems, the second largest global producer of the types of fuel and brake delivery products that we manufacture, the third largest global producer of fluid transfer systems, and one of the largest North American producers of anti-vibration systems.

We design and manufacture our products in each major region of the world through a disciplined and sustained approach to engineering and operational excellence. As of December 31, 2015, our operations were conducted through 98 wholly owned, leased and joint venture facilities in 20 countries, of which 79 are predominantly manufacturing facilities and 19 have design, engineering, administrative or logistics designation(s). The countries in which we operate include Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States. For the year ended December 31, 2015, we generated approximately 53% of our sales in North America, 31% in Europe, 13% in Asia Pacific, and 3% in South America. Because of our significant international operations, we are subject to the risks associated with doing business in other countries, such as currency volatility, high interest and inflation rates, and the general political and economic risk that are associated with some of these markets.

We believe that we are well-positioned for growth from increasing global vehicle production volumes, increasing average content of our products on each vehicle produced, and our continued new business wins with existing and new customers. For the year ended December 31, 2015, approximately 82% of our sales were to OEMs, including Ford, GM, FCA, PSA Peugeot Citroën, Volkswagen Group, Daimler, Renault-Nissan, BMW, Toyota, Volvo, Jaguar/Land Rover and Honda and various other OEMs based in India and China. The remaining 18% of our 2015 sales were primarily to Tier I and Tier II automotive suppliers, non-automotive manufacturers, and replacement market distributors.

Although each OEM may emphasize different requirements as the primary criteria for judging its suppliers, we believe success as an automotive supplier generally requires outstanding performance with respect to price, quality, service, performance, design and engineering capabilities, innovation,

 

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timely delivery and an extensive global footprint. Also, we believe our continued commitment to invest in global common processes is an important factor in servicing global customers with the same quality and consistency of product wherever we produce in the world. This is especially important when supplying products for global platforms.

In addition, to remain competitive, we must also consistently achieve and sustain cost savings. In an ongoing effort to reduce our cost structure, we run a global continuous improvement program which includes training for our employees, as well as implementation of lean tools, structured problem solving, best business practices, standardized processes and change management. We also evaluate opportunities to consolidate facilities and to relocate certain operations to lower cost countries. We believe we will continue to be successful in our efforts to improve our design and engineering capability and manufacturing processes while achieving cost savings, including through our continuous improvement initiatives.

Our OEM sales are principally generated from purchase orders issued by OEMs and as a result, we have typically have no order backlog. Once selected by an OEM to supply products for a particular platform, we typically supply those products for the life of the platform, which is normally three to five years (although there is no guarantee that this will occur). In addition, when we are the incumbent supplier to a given platform, we believe we have a competitive advantage in winning the redesign or replacement platform.

Business Environment and Outlook

Several factors will present significant opportunities for automotive suppliers who are positioned for the changing environment, such as:

 

    continued shift to global platforms;

 

    consolidation of suppliers;

 

    increased government regulation; and

 

    intensified consumer demand for advanced technological features in vehicles.

Our business is directly affected by the automotive build rates in North America, Europe, the Asia Pacific region and South America. New vehicle demand is driven by macro-economic and other factors, such as interest rates, manufacturer and dealer sales incentives, fuel prices, consumer confidence, employment levels, income growth trends and government and tax incentives.

The global automotive industry remains susceptible to uncertain economic conditions that could adversely impact new vehicle demand. While the U.S. economy remains strong, and the European economy shows indications of improvement, global economic sentiment remains cautious given continued geopolitical uncertainty, oil supply and demand issues and unfavorable foreign exchange rates. Ongoing volatility within the emerging markets, including declining economic conditions in Brazil and the slowing pace of economic growth in China, have impacted light vehicle production volume in recent periods.

Competition in the automotive supplier industry is intense and has increased in recent years as OEMs have demonstrated a preference for stronger relationships with fewer suppliers. There are typically three or more significant competitors and numerous smaller competitors for most of the products we produce. Automotive suppliers with a global manufacturing footprint capable of fully servicing customers around the world will continue to lead the supply industry going forward.

 

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OEMs have shifted some research and development, design and testing responsibility to suppliers, while at the same time shortening new product cycle times. To remain competitive, suppliers must have state-of-the-art engineering and design capabilities and must be able to continuously improve their engineering, design and manufacturing processes to effectively service the customer. Suppliers are increasingly expected to collaborate on, or assume the product design and development of, key automotive components and to provide innovative solutions to meet evolving technologies aimed at improved emissions and fuel economy.

Pricing pressure has continued as competition for market share has reduced the overall profitability of the industry and resulted in continued pressure on suppliers for price reductions. Consolidations and market share shifts among vehicle manufacturers continues to put additional pressures on the supply chain. These pricing and market pressures will continue to drive our focus on reducing our overall cost structure through continuous improvement initiatives, capital redeployment, restructuring and other cost management processes.

Results of Operations

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015     2014     2013  
     (dollar amounts in thousands)  

Sales

   $ 3,342,804      $ 3,243,987      $ 3,090,542   

Cost of products sold

     2,755,691        2,734,558        2,617,804   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     587,113        509,429        472,738   

Selling, administration & engineering expenses

     329,922        301,724        293,446   

Amortization of intangibles

     13,892        16,437        15,431   

Impairment charges

     21,611        26,273          

Restructuring charges

     53,844        17,414        21,720   

Other operating profit

     (8,033     (16,927       
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating profit

     175,877        164,508        142,141   

Interest expense, net of interest income

     (38,331     (45,604     (54,921

Equity earnings

     5,683        6,037        11,070   

Other income (expense), net

     9,759        (36,658     (7,437
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     152,988        88,283        90,853   

Income tax expense

     41,218        42,810        45,599   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     111,770        45,473        45,254   

Net loss (income) attributable to noncontrolling interests

     110        (2,694     2,687   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

   $ 111,880      $ 42,779      $ 47,941   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2015 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2014.

Sales.    Sales were $3,342.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to $3,244.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, an increase of $98.8 million, or 3.0%. Sales were favorably impacted by improved volume and product mix in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific, as well as our Shenya acquisition, partially offset by unfavorable foreign exchange of $298.2 million, decreased volumes in South America and customer price reductions.

Cost of Products Sold.    Cost of products sold is primarily comprised of material, labor, manufacturing overhead, depreciation and amortization and other direct operating expenses. Cost of

 

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products sold was $2,755.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to $2,734.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, an increase of $21.1 million or 0.8%. Materials comprise the largest component of our cost of products sold and represented approximately 50% and 49% of total cost of products sold for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Cost of sales was impacted by higher production volumes in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific, as well as our Shenya acquisition. These items were partially offset by decreased volumes in South America and continuous improvement savings.

Gross Profit.    Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $587.1 million compared to $509.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. As a percentage of sales, gross profit was 17.6% and 15.7% of sales for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The increase in gross profit was driven primarily by continuous improvement and material costs savings and improved volume and mix in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific. These items were partially offset by unfavorable foreign exchange, customer price reductions and decreased volumes in South America.

Selling, Administration and Engineering.    Selling, administration and engineering expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $329.9 million or 9.9% of sales compared to $301.7 million or 9.3% of sales for the year ended December 31, 2014. Selling, administration and engineering expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 was impacted primarily by incentive compensation due to favorable operating results, higher infrastructure costs and the Shenya acquisition, partially offset by favorable foreign exchange.

Impairment Charges.    In 2015, due to the deterioration of financial results the undiscounted cash flows at one of our European facilities and two of our South American facilities did not exceed their book value, resulting in non-cash asset impairment charges of $13.6 million being recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015. Additionally, due to the deterioration of the economic conditions in the region customer relationships in South America were fully impaired, resulting in a non-cash impairment charge of $8.0 million. In 2014, due to the deterioration of financial results the undiscounted cash flows at two of our European facilities and two of our North American facilities did not exceed their book value, resulting in an asset impairment charge of $24.2 million being recorded in the fourth quarter of 2014. Additionally, certain assets and patents in the North America segment were written down to their estimated fair market values, resulting in an impairment charge of $2.1 million.

Restructuring.    Restructuring charges of $53.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 increased $36.4 million compared to $17.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. The increase is primarily the result of expenses incurred related to our European restructuring initiative.

Other Operating Profit.    Other operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $8.0 million resulting from the gain on the sale of our hard coat plastic exterior trim business. Other operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $16.9 million, of which $16.0 million related to the gain on the sale of our thermal and emissions business.

Interest Expense, Net.    Net interest expense of $38.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 resulted primarily from interest and debt issuance amortization recorded on the Term Loan Facility. Net interest expense of $45.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 resulted primarily from interest and debt issuance amortization recorded on the Term Loan Facility, Senior Notes and Senior PIK Toggle Notes.

Other Income (Expense), Net.    Other income for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $9.8 million, consisting of the gain from remeasurement of our previously held equity interest in Shenya of $14.2 million, which was partially offset by $3.4 million of foreign currency losses and $1.0 million of

 

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loss on sale of receivables. Other expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $36.7 million, consisting of a $30.5 million loss on extinguishment of debt, $7.1 million of foreign currency losses and $1.9 million of loss on sale of receivables, which were partially offset by a $1.9 million gain on the sale of an equity method investment and $0.9 million of other miscellaneous income.

Income Tax Expense.    Income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2015 included an expense of $41.2 million on earnings before taxes of $153.0 million. This compares to an expense of $42.8 million on $88.3 million of earnings before taxes for the year ended December 31, 2014. Tax expense in 2015 and 2014 differed from the statutory rate due to the incremental valuation allowance recorded on tax losses and credits generated in certain foreign jurisdictions, tax incentives recognized in Poland resulting from increased current and future profitability and a new Special Economic Zone permit, the mix of income between the United States and foreign sources, tax credits and incentives, and other nonrecurring discrete items.

Year Ended December 31, 2014 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2013.

Sales.    Sales were $3,244.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to $3,090.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, an increase of $153.5 million, or 5.0%. Sales were favorably impacted by an increase in volumes in the North America, Europe and Asia Pacific segments. In addition, the Jyco Sealing Technologies, or Jyco, acquisition, which was completed July 31, 2013, provided $45.2 million of incremental sales. These items were partially offset by unfavorable foreign exchange of $31.3 million, customer price reductions and the sale of our thermal and emissions product line.

Cost of Products Sold.    Cost of products sold is primarily comprised of material, labor, manufacturing overhead, depreciation and amortization and other direct operating expenses. Cost of products sold was $2,734.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to $2,617.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, an increase of $116.8 million or 4.5%. Raw materials comprise the largest component of our cost of products sold and represented approximately 49% of total cost of products sold for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013. The period was impacted primarily by increased volumes.

Gross Profit.    Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $509.4 million compared to $472.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. As a percentage of sales, gross profit was 15.7% and 15.3% of sales for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The increase in gross profit was driven by the favorable impact of continuous improvement and material costs savings and increased volumes in the North America, Europe and Asia Pacific segments, partially offset by customer price reductions.

Selling, Administration and Engineering.    Selling, administration and engineering expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $301.7 million or 9.3% of sales compared to $293.4 million or 9.5% of sales for the year ended December 31, 2013. Selling, administration and engineering expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was impacted by increased staffing expenses as we increase our research and development and engineering resources to support our growth initiatives around the world.

Impairment Charges.    In 2014, the undiscounted cash flows at two of our European facilities and two of our North American facilities did not exceed their book value, resulting in an asset impairment charge of $24.2 million being recorded in the fourth quarter of 2014. Additionally, certain assets and patents in the North America segment were written down to their estimated fair market values, resulting in an impairment charge of $2.1 million.

 

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Restructuring.    Restructuring charges of $17.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 consisted primarily of initiatives in Europe to change our manufacturing footprint. Restructuring charges of $21.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 consisted primarily of $5.3 million of costs associated with initiatives announced prior to 2013 and $16.4 million of costs associated with initiatives announced in 2013, primarily relating to an initiative in Europe to change our manufacturing footprint.

Other Operating Profit.    Other operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $16.9 million, of which $16.0 million related to the gain on the sale of our thermal and emissions business.

Interest Expense, Net.    Net interest expense of $45.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 resulted primarily from interest and debt issuance amortization recorded on the Term Loan Facility, Senior Notes and Senior PIK Toggle Notes. Net interest expense of $54.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 resulted primarily from interest and debt issuance amortization recorded on the Senior Notes and Senior PIK Toggle Notes.

Other Income (Expense), Net.    Other expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $36.7 million, consisting of a $30.5 million loss on extinguishment of debt, $7.1 million of foreign currency losses and $1.9 million of loss on sale of receivables, which were partially offset by a $1.9 million gain on the sale of an equity method investment and $0.9 million of other miscellaneous income. Other expense for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $7.4 million, consisting of $9.4 million of foreign currency losses and $1.7 million of loss on sale of receivables, which were partially offset by $3.7 million of other miscellaneous income.

Income Tax Expense.    Income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2014 included an expense of $42.8 million on earnings before taxes of $88.3 million. This compares to an expense of $45.6 million on $90.9 million of earnings before taxes for the year ended December 31, 2013. Tax expense in 2014 differed from the statutory rate due to the incremental valuation allowance recorded on tax losses and credits generated in certain foreign jurisdictions, tax incentives recognized in Poland resulting from increased current and future profitability and a new Special Economic Zone permit, the distribution of income between the United States and foreign sources, tax credits and incentives, and other nonrecurring discrete items. Tax expense in 2013 differed from the statutory rate due to the incremental valuation allowance recorded on tax losses and credits generated in certain foreign jurisdictions, the mix of income between the United States and foreign sources, tax credits and incentives, and other nonrecurring discrete items.

 

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Segment Results of Operations

The following table presents sales and segment profit (loss) for each of the reportable segments for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015     2014     2013  
     (dollar amounts in thousands)  

Sales to external customers

      

North America

   $ 1,778,621      $ 1,698,826      $ 1,617,981   

Europe

     1,033,635        1,138,428        1,076,122   

Asia Pacific

     435,127        249,172        219,899   

South America

     95,421        157,561        176,540   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Consolidated

   $ 3,342,804      $ 3,243,987      $ 3,090,542   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Segment profit (loss)

      

North America

   $ 215,487        136,682        134,727   

Europe

     (22,435     (28,062     (40,046

Asia Pacific

     4,063        3,524        8,104   

South America

     (44,127     (23,861     (11,932
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

   $ 152,988      $ 88,283      $ 90,853   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2015 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2014.

North America.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2015 increased $79.8 million or 4.7%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2014, primarily due to an improvement in sales volume and product mix, partially offset by unfavorable foreign exchange of $44.9 million and customer price reductions. Segment profit for the year ended December 31, 2015 increased $78.8 million primarily due to the favorable impact of continuous improvement and material cost savings, an improvement in sales volume and mix, partially offset by customer price reductions, unfavorable foreign exchange and higher incentive compensation due to favorable operating results.

Europe.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased $104.8 million, or 9.2%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2014, primarily due to unfavorable foreign exchange of $204.8 million and customer price reductions, partially offset by improved sales volume. Segment loss improved by $5.6 million, primarily due to improved sales volume and mix, continuous improvement and material cost savings and the gain from the remeasurement of a previously held equity interest in Shenya as the legal ownership was held by one of our European entities, partially offset by unfavorable foreign exchange, increased restructuring costs, customer price reductions and higher incentive compensation due to improved operating results.

Asia Pacific.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2015 increased $186.0 million, or 74.6%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2014, primarily due to the Shenya acquisition which was completed February 27, 2015, and improved sales volume, partially offset by unfavorable foreign exchange of $11.7 million. Segment profit increased by $0.5 million, primarily due to improved sales volume and mix, the Shenya acquisition and the favorable impact of continuous improvement and material costs savings, partially offset by higher engineering and administrative costs to support growth in the region as well as higher incentive compensation due to favorable operating results.

South America.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased $62.1 million or 39.4%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2014, primarily due to unfavorable foreign exchange of $36.8 million and a decrease in sales volumes. Segment loss increased by $20.3 million, primarily due

 

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to impairment charges at two facilities and the write off of customer relationships that were impaired, a decrease in sales volume and unfavorable foreign exchange, partially offset by the favorable impact of continuous improvement savings.

Year Ended December 31, 2014 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2013.

North America.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2014 increased $80.8 million or 5.0%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2013, primarily due to an increase in sales volume. In addition, sales were favorably impacted by the Jyco acquisition, which was completed July 31, 2013. These items were partially offset by customer price reductions, the sale of our thermal and emissions product line, and unfavorable foreign exchange of $21.8 million. Segment profit for the year ended December 31, 2014 increased $2.0 million, primarily due to the favorable impact of continuous improvement savings, increased sales volume and material cost savings, partially offset by the loss on extinguishment of debt, impairment charges, customer price reductions, and higher staffing costs.

Europe.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2014 increased $62.3 million, or 5.8%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2013, primarily due to an increase in sales volume and favorable foreign exchange of $2.5 million, which were partially offset by customer price reductions and the sale of our thermal and emissions product line. Segment loss improved by $12.0 million, primarily due to increased sales volume, and the favorable impact of continuous improvement and material cost savings, which were partially offset by the loss on extinguishment of debt, impairment charges, customer price reductions and higher staffing costs.

Asia Pacific.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2014 increased $29.3 million, or 13.3%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2013, primarily due to an increase in sales volume. In addition, sales were favorably impacted by the Jyco acquisition, which was completed July 31, 2013. These items were partially offset by unfavorable foreign exchange of $2.1 million and customer price reductions. Segment profit decreased by $4.6 million, primarily due to the loss on extinguishment of debt, higher staffing costs and customer price reductions, which were partially offset by increased volumes and the favorable impact of continuous improvement and material cost savings.

South America.    Sales for the year ended December 31, 2014 decreased $19.0 million, or 10.8%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2013, primarily due to a decrease in sales volumes and unfavorable foreign exchange of $9.9 million. Segment loss increased by $11.9 million, primarily due to the loss on extinguishment of debt, and a decrease in sales volume.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Short and Long-Term Liquidity Considerations and Risks

We intend to fund our ongoing working capital, capital expenditures, debt service and other funding requirements through a combination of cash flows from operations, cash on hand, borrowings under our Senior ABL Facility, and receivables factoring. We anticipate that these funding sources will be sufficient to meet our needs for the next twelve months. The Company utilizes intercompany loans and equity contributions to fund its worldwide operations. There may be country specific regulations which may restrict or result in increased costs in the repatriation of these funds. See Note 7. “Debt” to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement for additional information.

Based on our current and anticipated levels of operations and the condition in our markets and industry, we believe that our cash flows from operations, cash on hand, borrowings under our Senior ABL Facility and receivables factoring will enable us to meet our ongoing working capital, capital

 

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expenditures, debt service and other funding requirements for the next twelve months. However, our ability to fund our working capital needs, debt payments and other obligations, and to comply with the financial covenants, including borrowing base limitations, under our Senior ABL Facility, depends on our future operating performance and cash flow and many factors outside of our control, including the costs of raw materials, the state of the overall automotive industry and financial and economic conditions and other factors.

Cash Flows

Operating Activities.    Net cash provided by operations was $270.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, which included $36.6 million of cash provided by operating assets and liabilities. Cash provided by operations was primarily the result of increased earnings, as well as changes in accounts and tooling receivables, accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $63.9 million. In addition, pension contributions of $7.9 million were made during the year ended December 31, 2015. Net cash provided by operations was $171.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, which included $43.1 million of cash used that related to changes in operating assets and liabilities. The use of cash related to operating assets and liabilities was primarily a result of changes in accounts receivable and tooling receivables and accounts payable of $29.4 million and pension contributions of $12.2 million.

Investing Activities.    Net cash used in investing activities was $166.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, which consisted primarily of $166.3 million of capital spending, $34.4 million for the Shenya acquisition and $4.3 million for investment in joint ventures, offset by proceeds of $33.5 million for the sale of our hard coat plastic exterior trim business and $5.1 million for the sale of fixed assets and other. Net cash used in investing activities was $157.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, which consisted primarily of $192.1 million of capital spending and $21.2 million for the acquisition of businesses, offset by proceeds of $50.6 million from the sale of our thermal and emissions product line, the Australian business and the sale of an investment in affiliate, proceeds of $4.4 million for the sale of fixed assets and other, and a $1.0 million return on equity investments. We anticipate that we will spend approximately $155 million to $165 million on capital expenditures in 2016.

Financing Activities.    Net cash used in financing activities totaled $11.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, which consisted primarily of a decrease in short term debt of $9.0 million, payments on long term debt of $8.9 million, taxes withheld and paid on employees’ share based awards of $2.0 million, and the purchase of noncontrolling interests of $1.3 million, partially offset by $9.3 million related to the exercise of stock warrants. Net cash provided by financing activities totaled $49.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, which consisted primarily of $737.5 million related to the proceeds from issuance of long-term debt, $9.0 million related to the exercise of stock warrants, increase in long-term debt of $6.6 million and excess tax benefit on stock options exercised of $4.1 million, partially offset by the repurchase of the Senior Notes and the Senior PIK Toggle Notes of $675.6 million, purchase of noncontrolling interest of $18.5 million, payments on long-term debt of $4.3 million, repurchase of common stock of $5.2 million and taxes withheld and paid on employees’ share based awards of $4.2 million.

Financing Arrangements

Senior ABL Facility

On April 4, 2014, CS Intermediate Holdco 1 LLC, or Parent, Cooper-Standard Automotive Inc., or the U.S. Borrower, Cooper-Standard Automotive Canada Limited, or the Canadian Borrower, Cooper-Standard Automotive International Holdings BV, or the European Borrower and, together with the U.S. Borrower and Canadian Borrower, the Borrowers, and certain subsidiaries of the U.S. Borrower

 

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entered into the Second Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement in connection with its Senior ABL Facility, with certain lenders, Bank of America, N.A., as agent, or the Agent, for such lenders, Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., as syndication agent, and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as joint lead arrangers and bookrunners. On June 11, 2014, the Parent and the Borrowers entered into Amendment No. 1 to the Second Amended and Restated Senior ABL Facility. A summary of our Senior ABL Facility is set forth below. This description is qualified in its entirety by reference to the credit agreement governing our Senior ABL Facility.

General.    Our Senior ABL Facility provides for an aggregate revolving loan availability of up to $180.0 million, subject to borrowing base availability, including a $60.0 million letter of credit sub-facility and a $25.0 million swing line sub-facility. Our Senior ABL Facility also provides for an uncommitted $75.0 million incremental loan facility, for a potential total Senior ABL Facility of $255.0 million (if requested by the Borrowers and the lenders agree to fund such increase). No consent of any lender (other than those participating in the increase) is required to effect any such increase. On December 31, 2015, there were no borrowings under the Senior ABL Facility, and subject to borrowing base availability, the Company had $180.0 million in availability, less outstanding letters of credit of $42.6 million.

Maturity.    Any borrowings under our Senior ABL Facility will mature, and the commitments of the lenders under our Senior ABL Facility will terminate, on March 1, 2018.

Borrowing Base.    Loan and letter of credit availability under our Senior ABL Facility is subject to a borrowing base, which at any time is limited to the lesser of: (A) the maximum facility amount (subject to certain adjustments) and (B) (i) up to 85% of eligible accounts receivable; plus (ii) the lesser of 70% of eligible inventory or 85% of the appraised net orderly liquidation value of eligible inventory; minus reserves established by the Agent. The accounts receivable portion of the borrowing base is subject to certain formulaic limitations (including concentration limits). The inventory portion of the borrowing base is limited to eligible inventory, as determined by the Agent. The borrowing base is also subject to certain reserves, which are established by the Agent (which may include changes to the advance rates indicated above). Loan availability under our Senior ABL Facility is apportioned as follows: $150.0 million to the U.S. Borrower., which includes a $60.0 million sublimit to the European Borrower and $30.0 million to the Canadian Borrower.

Guarantees; Security.    Obligations under our Senior ABL Facility and cash management arrangements and hedging arrangements, in each case with the lenders and their affiliates, or collectively, Additional ABL Secured Obligations, entered into by the U.S. Borrower are guaranteed on a senior secured basis by the Company and all of its U.S. subsidiaries. Obligations of the Canadian Borrower under our Senior ABL Facility and Additional ABL Secured Obligations of the Canadian Borrower and its Canadian subsidiaries are guaranteed on a senior secured basis by the Company, its U.S. subsidiaries and the Canadian Borrower and Canadian subsidiaries. Obligations of the European Borrower under our Senior ABL Facility and Additional ABL Secured Obligations of the European Borrower are guaranteed on a senior secured basis by the Parent and its U.S. subsidiaries. The obligations under our Senior ABL Facility and related guarantees are secured by (1) a first priority lien on all of each Borrower’s and each guarantor’s existing and future personal property consisting of accounts receivable, payment intangibles, inventory, documents, instruments, chattel paper and investment property, certain money, deposit accounts, securities accounts, letters of credit, commercial tort claims and certain related assets and proceeds of the foregoing and (2) a second priority lien on all the capital stock in restricted subsidiaries directly held by the U.S. Borrower and each of the U.S. Guarantors, substantially all material owned real property located in the U.S. and equipment of the U.S. Borrower and the U.S. Guarantors and all other material personal property of the U.S. Borrower and the U.S. Guarantors.

 

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Interest.    Borrowings under our Senior ABL Facility bear interest at a rate equal to, at the Borrowers’ option:

 

    in the case of borrowings by the U.S. Borrower, LIBOR or the base rate plus, in each case, an applicable margin;

 

    in the case of borrowings by the Canadian Borrower, bankers’ acceptance, or BA, rate, Canadian prime rate or Canadian base rate plus, in each case, an applicable margin; or

 

    in the case of borrowings by the European Borrower, LIBOR plus an applicable margin.

The applicable margin may vary between 1.50% and 2.00% with respect to the LIBOR or BA-based borrowings and between 0.50% and 1.00% with respect to base rate, Canadian prime rate and Canadian base rate borrowings. The applicable margin is subject, in each case, to quarterly pricing adjustments based on usage over the immediately preceding quarter.

In addition to paying interest on outstanding principal under our Senior ABL Facility, the Borrowers are required to pay a fee in respect of committed but unused commitments. The Borrowers are also required to pay a fee on outstanding letters of credit under our Senior ABL Facility together with customary issuance and other letter of credit fees. Our Senior ABL Facility also required the payment of customary agency and administrative fees.

The Borrowers are able to voluntarily reduce the unutilized portion of the commitment amount and repay outstanding loans, in each case, in whole or in part, at any time without premium or penalty (other than customary breakage and related reemployment costs with respect to repayments of any outstanding borrowings).

Covenants; Events of Default.    Our Senior ABL Facility includes affirmative and negative covenants that impose substantial restrictions on our financial and business operations, including our ability to incur and secure debt, make investments, sell assets, pay dividends or make acquisitions. Our Senior ABL Facility also includes a requirement to maintain a monthly fixed charge coverage ratio of no less than 1.0 to 1.0 when availability under our Senior ABL Facility is less than specified levels or an event of default has occurred. Our Senior ABL Facility also contains various events of default that are customary for comparable facilities.

Our current revenue forecast for 2016 is determined from specific platform volume projections consistent with a North American and European light vehicle production estimate of 18.2 million units and 21.2 million units, respectively. Adverse changes to the vehicle production levels could have a negative impact on our future sales, liquidity, results of operations and ability to comply with our debt covenants under our Senior ABL Facility or any future financing arrangements we enter into. In addition to the potential impact of changes on our sales, our current operating performance and future compliance with the covenants under our Senior ABL Facility or any future financing arrangements we enter into are dependent upon a number of other external and internal factors, such as changes in raw material costs, changes in foreign currency rates, our ability to execute our cost savings initiatives, our ability to implement and achieve the savings expected by the changes in our operating structure and other factors beyond our control.

Term Loan Facility

On April 4, 2014, certain subsidiaries of the Company entered into a Term Loan Facility in order to (i) refinance the 8 12% Senior Notes due 2018 and 7 38% Senior PIK Toggle Notes due 2018, including applicable call premiums and accrued and unpaid interest, (ii) pay related fees and expenses and (iii) provide for working capital and other general corporate purposes. The Term Loan Facility provides for loans in an aggregate principal amount of $750.0 million and may be increased (or a new

 

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term loan facility added) by an amount that will not cause the consolidated first lien debt ratio to exceed 2.25 to 1.00 plus $300.0 million. All obligations of the borrower are guaranteed jointly and severally on a senior secured basis by the direct parent company of the borrower and each existing and subsequently acquired direct or indirect wholly-owned U.S. restricted subsidiary of the borrower. The obligations are secured by amongst other items (a) a first priority security interest (subject to permitted liens and other customary exceptions) on (i) all the capital stock in restricted subsidiaries directly held by the borrower and each of the guarantors (limited to 65% of the capital stock of any Foreign subsidiaries), (ii) substantially all plant, material owned real property located in the U.S. and equipment of the borrower and the guarantors and (iii) all other personal property of the borrower and the guarantors, and (b) a second priority security interest (subject to permitted liens and other customary exceptions) in accounts receivable of the borrowers and the guarantors arising from the sale of goods and services, inventory, excluding certain collateral and subject to certain limitations. Loans under the Term Loan Facility bear interest at a rate equal to, at the Borrower’s option, LIBOR, subject to a 1.00% LIBOR Floor, plus an applicable margin of 3.00% or the base rate option (the highest of the Federal Funds rate plus 0.50%, prime rate, or one-month Eurodollar rate plus 1.00%), plus an applicable margin of 2.00%. The Term Loan Facility matures on April 4, 2021. On April 4, 2014, the aggregate principal amount of $750.0 million was fully drawn to extinguish the Senior PIK Toggle Notes and the Senior Notes and to pay related fees and expenses. Debt issuance costs of approximately $7.9 million were incurred on this transaction, along with the original issue discount of $3.8 million. Both the debt issuance costs and the original issue discount will be amortized into interest expense over the term of the Term Loan Facility. As of December 31, 2015, the principal amount of $738.8 million was outstanding. As of December 31, 2015, the Company had $2.8 million of unamortized original issue discount.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As a part of our working capital management, we sell certain receivables through third party financial institutions without recourse. The amount sold varies each month based on the amount of underlying receivables and cash flow needs. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, we had $63.5 million and $96.0 million, respectively, of receivables outstanding under receivable transfer agreements entered into by various locations. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, total accounts receivables factored were $264.8 million and $509.3 million, respectively. Costs incurred on the sale of receivables were $2.1 million, $3.3 million and $2.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. These amounts are recorded in other income (expense), net and interest expense, net of interest income in the consolidated statements of net income. These are permitted transactions under our credit agreement governing our Senior ABL Facility and Term Loan Facility.

As of December 31, 2015, we had no other material off-balance sheet arrangements.

Working Capital

Historically, we have not generally experienced difficulties in collecting our accounts receivable, other than the dynamics associated with a global economic downturn which impact both the amount of our receivables and adversely impacts the ability of our customers to pay within normal terms. We believe that we currently have a strong working capital position. As of December 31, 2015, we had cash and cash equivalents of $378.2 million.

Contractual Obligations

Our contractual cash obligations consist of legal commitments requiring us to make fixed or determinable cash payments, regardless of the contractual requirements of the vendor to provide future goods or services. Except as otherwise disclosed, this table does not include information on our

 

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recurring purchase of materials for use in production because our raw materials purchase contracts typically do not require fixed or minimum quantities.

The following table summarizes the total amounts due as of December 31, 2015 under all debt agreements, commitments and other contractual obligations.

 

     Payment due by period  
     Total      Less than
1 year
     1-3 years      3-5 years      More than
5 years
 
     (dollar amounts in millions)  

Debt obligations

   $ 738.8       $ 7.5         15.0       $ 15.0       $ 701.3   

Interest on debt obligations

     155.5         29.8         58.8         57.6         9.3   

Operating lease obligations

     85.5         24.5         28.0         18.5         14.5   

Other obligations(1)

     48.1         39.7         4.4         4.0           
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1,027.9       $ 101.5       $ 106.2       $ 95.1       $ 725.1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Represents borrowings and capital lease obligations.

In addition to our contractual obligations and commitments set forth in the table above, we have employment arrangements with certain key executives that provide for continuity of management. These arrangements include payments of multiples of annual salary, certain incentives and continuation of benefits upon the occurrence of specified events in a manner that is believed to be consistent with comparable companies.

We also have minimum funding requirements with respect to our pension obligations. We expect to make minimum cash contributions of approximately $2.3 million to our foreign pension plan asset portfolios in 2016. We do not expect to make cash contributions to our U.S. pension plans in 2016. Our minimum funding requirements after 2016 will depend on several factors, including the investment performance of our retirement plans and prevailing interest rates. Our funding obligations may also be affected by changes in applicable legal requirements. Further, we expect to make cash contributions of $3.9 million to certain of our unfunded pension plans in 2016. We also have payments due with respect to our postretirement benefit obligations. We do not prefund our postretirement benefit obligations. Rather, payments are made as costs are incurred by covered retirees. We expect other postretirement benefit net payments to be approximately $2.6 million in 2016.

We may be required to make significant cash outlays due to our unrecognized tax benefits. However, due to the uncertainty of the timing of future cash flows associated with our unrecognized tax benefits, we are unable to make reasonably reliable estimates of the period of cash settlement, if any, with the respective taxing authorities. Accordingly, unrecognized tax benefits of $7.8 million as of December 31, 2015 have been excluded from the contractual obligations table above. See Note 10. “Income Taxes” to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement for additional information.

In addition, excluded from the contractual obligation table are open purchase orders at December 31, 2015 for raw materials, supplies and capital expenditures in the normal course of business, supply contracts with customers, distribution agreements, joint venture agreements and other contracts without express funding requirements.

Raw Materials and Manufactured Components

The principal raw materials for our business include EPDM and synthetic rubber, components manufactured from carbon steel, plastic resins and components, carbon black, process oils,

 

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components manufactured from aluminum and natural rubber. We manage the procurement of our raw materials to assure supply and to obtain the most favorable total cost of ownership. Procurement arrangements include short-term and long-term supply agreements that may contain formula-based pricing based on commodity indices. These arrangements provide quantities needed to satisfy normal manufacturing demands.

We believe we have adequate sources for the supply of raw materials and components for our products with suppliers located around the world. We often use offshore suppliers for machined components, die castings and other labor-intensive, economically freighted products in our North American and European facilities.

Extreme fluctuations in material pricing have occurred in recent years, adding challenges in forecasting supply costs. Our inability generally to recover higher than anticipated material costs from our customers could impact our profitability.

Seasonal Trends

Historically, sales to automotive customers are lowest during the months prior to model changeovers and during assembly plant shutdowns. However, economic conditions and consumer demand may change the traditional seasonality of the industry, and lower production may prevail without the impact of seasonality. In the past, model changeover periods have typically resulted in lower sales volumes during July, August and December. During these periods of lower sales volumes, profit performance is reduced but working capital often improves due to the continued collection of accounts receivable.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our accounting policies are more fully described in Note 2. “Significant Accounting Policies,” to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement. Application of these accounting policies requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Management bases its estimates and judgments on historical experience and on other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe that, of our significant accounting policies, the following may involve a higher degree of judgment or estimation than other accounting policies.

Pre-Production Costs Related to Long Term Supply Arrangements.    Costs for molds, dies and other tools owned by us to produce products under long-term supply arrangements are recorded at cost in property, plant, and equipment and amortized over the lesser of three years or the term of the related supply agreement. We expense all pre-production tooling costs related to customer-owned tools for which reimbursement is not contractually guaranteed by the customer.

Goodwill.    As of December 31, 2015 and 2014, we had recorded goodwill of approximately $149.2 million and $135.2 million, respectively. Goodwill is not amortized but is tested for impairment, either annually or when events or circumstances indicate that impairment may exist. We evaluate each reporting unit’s fair value versus its carrying value annually or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may exceed the fair value of the reporting unit. Estimated fair values are based on the cash flows projected in the reporting units’ strategic plans and

 

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long-range planning forecasts discounted at a risk-adjusted rate of return. We assess the reasonableness of these estimated fair values using market based multiples of comparable companies. If the carrying value exceeds the fair value, an impairment loss is measured and recognized. Goodwill fair value measurements are classified within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy, which are generally determined using unobservable inputs. We conduct our annual goodwill impairment as of October 1st of each year.

Our annual goodwill impairment analysis, completed as of the first day of the fourth quarter, resulted in no impairment for 2015 or 2014.

Long-Lived Assets.    We monitor our long-lived assets for impairment indicators on an ongoing basis in accordance with ASC 360, “Property, Plant, and Equipment.” If impairment indicators exist, we perform the required analysis by comparing the undiscounted cash flows expected to be generated from the long-lived assets to the related net book values. If the net book value exceeds the undiscounted cash flows, an impairment loss is measured and recognized. An impairment loss is measured as the difference between the net book value and the fair value of the long-lived assets. Fair value is estimated based upon either discounted cash flow analysis or estimated salvage values. Cash flows are estimated using internal budgets based on recent sales data, independent automotive production volume estimates and customer commitments, as well as assumptions related to discount rates. Changes in economic or operating conditions impacting these estimates and assumptions could result in the impairment of long-lived assets. During 2015, we impaired property, plant and equipment at our South American and European facilities with a carrying value of $36.2 million to their fair value of $22.6 million, resulting in an impairment charge of $13.6 million. Fair value was determined using the estimated salvage values. Additionally, customer relationship intangible assets in South America were fully impaired, resulting in an impairment charge of $8.0 million.

Restructuring.    Specific accruals have been recorded in connection with restructuring initiatives. These accruals include estimates principally related to employee separation costs, the closure and/or consolidation of facilities, contractual obligations and the valuation of certain assets. Actual amounts recognized could differ from the original estimates. Restructuring-related reserves are reviewed on a quarterly basis, and changes to plans are appropriately recognized when identified. Changes to plans associated with the restructuring of existing businesses are generally recognized as employee separation and plant phase-out costs in the period the change occurs. See Note 4. “Restructuring” to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement for additional information.

Revenue Recognition and Sales Commitments.    We generally enter into agreements with our customers to produce products at the beginning of a vehicle’s life. Although such agreements do not generally provide for minimum quantities, once we enter into such agreements, fulfillment of our customers’ purchasing requirements can be our obligation for an extended period or the entire production life of the vehicle. These agreements generally may be terminated by our customer at any time. Historically, terminations of these agreements have been minimal. In certain limited instances, we may be committed under existing agreements to supply products to our customers at selling prices which are not sufficient to cover the direct cost to produce such products. In such situations, we recognize losses as they are incurred.

We receive blanket purchase orders from many of our customers on an annual basis. Generally, such purchase orders and related documents set forth the annual terms, including pricing, related to a particular vehicle model. Such purchase orders generally do not specify quantities. We recognize revenue based on the pricing terms included in our annual purchase orders as our products are shipped to our customers. As part of certain agreements, we are asked to provide our customers with annual cost reductions. We accrue for such amounts as a reduction of revenue as our products are

 

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shipped to our customers. In addition, we generally have ongoing adjustments to our pricing arrangements with our customers based on the related content and cost of our products. Such pricing accruals are adjusted as they are settled with our customers.

Income Taxes.    In determining the provision for income taxes for financial statement purposes, we make estimates and judgments which affect our evaluation of the carrying value of our deferred tax assets as well as our calculation of certain tax liabilities. In accordance with ASC Topic 740, Accounting for Income Taxes, we evaluate the carrying value of our deferred tax assets on a quarterly basis. In completing this evaluation, we consider all available positive and negative evidence. Such evidence includes historical operating results, the existence of cumulative earnings and losses in the most recent fiscal years, expectations for future pretax operating income, the time period over which our temporary differences will reverse, and the implementation of feasible and prudent tax planning strategies. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance if, based on the weight of this evidence, it is more likely than not that all or a portion of the recorded deferred tax assets will not be realized in future periods.

Concluding that a valuation allowance is not required is difficult when there is significant negative evidence which is objective and verifiable, such as cumulative losses in recent years. The Company utilizes three years cumulative pre-tax book results adjusted for significant permanent book to tax differences as a measure of cumulative results in recent years. In certain foreign jurisdictions, our analysis indicates that we have cumulative three year historical losses on this basis. This is considered significant negative evidence which is difficult to overcome. However, the three-year loss position is not solely determinative, and, accordingly, management considers all other available positive and negative evidence in its analysis. Based upon this analysis, management concluded that it is more likely than not that the net deferred tax assets in certain foreign jurisdictions may not be realized in the future. Accordingly, the Company continues to maintain a valuation allowance related to those net deferred tax assets.

We continue to maintain a valuation allowance related to our net deferred tax assets in several foreign jurisdictions. As of December 31, 2015, we had valuation allowances of $137.0 million related to tax loss and credit carryforwards and other deferred tax assets in several foreign jurisdictions. Our valuation allowance decreased in 2015 primarily as a result of foreign currency, as well as the release of valuation allowances against our net deferred tax asset in certain foreign jurisdictions partially offset by current year losses with no benefit in certain foreign jurisdictions. The effective tax rate in the year ended December 31, 2015 was impacted by a tax benefit of $14.9 million resulting from changes in judgment related to deferred tax asset valuation allowances. Our current and future provision for income taxes is significantly impacted by the initial recognition of and changes in valuation allowances in certain countries. We intend to maintain these allowances until it is more likely than not that the deferred tax assets will be realized. Our future provision for income taxes will include no tax benefit with respect to losses incurred and no tax expense with respect to income generated in these countries until the respective valuation allowance is eliminated.

In addition, the calculation of our tax benefits and liabilities includes uncertainties in the application of complex tax regulations in a multitude of jurisdictions across our global operations. We recognize tax benefits and liabilities based on our estimate of whether and the extent to which additional taxes will be due. We adjust these liabilities based on changing facts and circumstances; however, due to the complexity of some of these uncertainties and the impact of any tax audits, the ultimate resolutions may be materially different from our estimated liabilities. See Note 10. “Income Taxes” to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement for additional information.

Pensions and Postretirement Benefits Other Than Pensions.    Included in our results of operations are significant pension and postretirement benefit costs, which are measured using

 

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actuarial valuations. Inherent in these valuations are key assumptions, including assumptions about discount rates and expected returns on plan assets. These assumptions are determined as of the current year measurement date. We are required to consider current market conditions, including changes in interest rates, in making these assumptions. Changes in pension and postretirement benefit costs may occur in the future due to changes in these assumptions. Our net pension and postretirement benefit costs were approximately $4.9 million and $1.3 million, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2015.

To develop the discount rate for each plan, the expected cash flows underlying the plan’s benefit obligations were discounted using a December 31, 2015 pension index to determine a single equivalent rate. To develop our expected return on plan assets, we considered historical long-term asset return experience, the expected investment portfolio mix of plan assets and an estimate of long-term investment returns. To develop our portfolio of plan assets, we considered the duration of the plan liabilities and gave more weight to equity positions, including both public and private equity investments, than to fixed-income securities. Holding all other assumptions constant, a 1% increase or decrease in the discount rate would have decreased or increased the fiscal 2016 net periodic benefit cost expense by approximately $0.9 million or $1.2 million, respectively. Likewise, a 1% increase or decrease in the expected return on plan assets would have decreased or increased the fiscal 2016 net periodic benefit cost by approximately $3.1 million. Decreasing or increasing the discount rate by 1% would have increased or decreased the projected benefit obligations by approximately $67.9 million or $54.9 million, respectively. Aggregate pension net periodic benefit cost is forecasted to be approximately $6.7 million in 2016.

The expected annual rate of increase in health care costs is approximately 5.97% for 2015 (5.96% for the United States, 6.00% for Canada), grading down to 5% in 2018, and was held constant at 5.00% for years past 2018. These trend rates were assumed to reflect market trend, actual experience and future expectations. The health care cost trend rate assumption has a significant effect on the amounts reported. Only certain employees hired are eligible to participate in our subsidized postretirement plan. A 1% change in the assumed health care cost trend rate would have increased or decreased the fiscal 2016 service and interest cost components by $0.2 million in each case, and the projected benefit obligations would have increased or decreased by $3.1 million or $2.5 million, respectively. Aggregate other postretirement net periodic benefit cost is forecasted to be approximately $0.7 million in 2016.

The general funding policy is to contribute amounts deductible for U.S. federal income tax purposes or amounts required by local statute.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

We are exposed to fluctuations in interest rates, currency exchange rates and commodity prices. We actively monitor our exposure to risk from changes in foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates through the use of derivative financial instruments in accordance with management’s guidelines. We do not enter into derivative instruments for trading purposes. See Note 20. “Fair Value Measurements and Financial Instruments” to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement.

Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk.    We use forward foreign exchange contracts to reduce the effect of fluctuations in foreign exchange rates on a portion of forecasted material purchases and operating expenses. As of December 31, 2015, the notional amount of these contracts was $29.3 million. As of December 31, 2015, the fair value of the Company’s forward foreign exchange contracts was an asset of $0.8 million.

 

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In addition to transactional exposures, our operating results are impacted by the translation of our foreign operating income into U.S. dollars. In 2015, net sales outside of the United States accounted for 73% of our consolidated net sales, although certain non-U.S. sales are U.S. dollar denominated. We do not enter into foreign exchange contracts to mitigate this exposure.

Interest Rates.    In August 2014, the Company entered into interest rate swap transactions to manage cash flow variability associated with its variable rate Term Loan Facility. The interest rate swap contracts, which fix the interest payments of variable rate debt instruments, are used to manage exposure to fluctuations in interest rates. At December 31, 2015, the notional amount of these contracts was $300.0 million. As of December 31, 2015, the fair value of the Company’s interest rate swaps was a liability of $4.7 million.

Commodity Prices.    We have commodity price risk with respect to purchases of certain raw materials, including natural gas and carbon black. Raw material, energy and commodity costs have been extremely volatile over the past several years. Historically, we have used derivative instruments to reduce our exposure to fluctuations in certain commodity prices. We did not enter into any commodity derivative instruments in 2015. We will continue to evaluate, and may use, derivative financial instruments to manage our exposure to higher raw material, energy and commodity prices in the future.

 

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BUSINESS

Our Business

Cooper Standard is a leading manufacturer of sealing, fuel and brake delivery, fluid transfer and anti-vibration systems. Our products are primarily for use in passenger vehicles and light trucks that are manufactured by global automotive OEMs and replacement markets. We believe we are the largest global producer of sealing systems, the second largest global producer of the types of fuel and brake delivery products that we manufacture, the third largest global producer of fluid transfer systems, and one of the largest North American producers of anti-vibration systems.

We design and manufacture our products in each major region of the world through a disciplined and sustained approach to engineering and operational excellence. As of December 31, 2015, our operations were conducted through 98 wholly owned, leased and joint venture facilities in 20 countries, of which 79 are predominantly manufacturing facilities and 19 have design, engineering, administrative or logistics designation(s). The countries in which we operate include Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States. For the year ended December 31, 2015, we generated approximately 53% of our sales in North America, 31% in Europe, 13% in Asia Pacific, and 3% in South America.

We believe that we are well-positioned for growth from increasing global vehicle production volumes, increasing average content of our products on each vehicle produced, and our continued new business wins with existing and new customers. For the year ended December 31, 2015, approximately 82% of our sales were to OEMs, including Ford, GM, FCA, PSA Peugeot Citroën, Volkswagen Group, Daimler, Renault-Nissan, BMW, Toyota, Volvo, Jaguar/Land Rover and Honda and various other OEMs based in India and China. The remaining 18% of our 2015 sales were primarily to Tier I and Tier II automotive suppliers, non-automotive manufacturers, and replacement market distributors.

The following chart illustrates our balance and business diversity by providing a breakdown of our $3.3 billion in sales for the year ended December 31, 2015 by geography, customer, and product line.

 

LOGO

We conduct substantially all of our activities through our subsidiaries and sell our product lines through four reportable segments—North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and South America. For the year ended December 31, 2015, we had sales in such segments of $1.8 billion, $1.0 billion, $0.4 billion, and $0.1 billion, respectively.

 

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Products

We have four distinct product lines. These products are produced and supplied globally to a broad range of customers in multiple markets. The percentage of sales by product for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013 are as follows:

 

     Percentage of Sales  

Product Line

   2015     2014     2013  

Sealing systems

     53     52     51

Fuel and brake delivery systems

     20     20     23

Fluid transfer systems

     14     14     13

Anti-vibration systems

     8     8     9

In addition to these product lines, we also have sales to other adjacent markets.

 

Product Lines

         

Market Position

SEALING SYSTEMS

  Protect vehicle interiors from weather, dust and noise intrusion for improved driving experience; provide aesthetic and functional class-A exterior surface treatment   Global leader
  Products:    
 

–   Fortrex

 

–   Stainless steel trim

 
 

–   Dynamic seals

 

–   Flush glass systems

 
 

–   Static seals

 

–   Variable extrusion

 
 

–   Encapsulated glass

 

–   Specialty sealing products

 

FUEL & BRAKE DELIVERY SYSTEMS

  Sense, deliver and control fluids to fuel and brake systems   Top 2 globally
 

Products:

   
 

–   Chassis and tank fuel lines and bundles (fuel lines, vapor lines and bundles)

 

–   Direct injection & port fuel rails (fuel rails and fuel charging assemblies)

 
 

–   Metallic brake lines and bundles

 

–   Quick connects

 

FLUID TRANSFER SYSTEMS

  Sense, deliver and control fluid and vapors for optimal powertrain & HVAC operation   Top 3 globally
 

Products:

   
 

–   Heater/coolant hoses

 

–   Turbo charger hoses

 
 

–   Quick connects

 

–   Secondary air hoses

 
 

–   DPF and SCR emission lines

 

–   Brake and clutch hoses

 
 

–   Degas tanks

 

–   ArmorHose

 
 

–   Air intake and charge

 

–   ArmorHose II

 
 

–   Transmission Oil Cooling Hoses

 

–   ArmorHose TPV

 

 

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Product Lines

         

Market Position

ANTI-VIBRATION SYSTEMS

  Control and isolate noise and vibration in the vehicle to improve ride and handling   North America leader
  Products:    
 

–   Powertrain Mount Systems: (Multi-state Vacuum Switchable Hydraulic Engine Mounts, Bi-state Electric Switchable Hydraulic Engine Mounts, Conventional Hydraulic Mounts, Elastomeric Mounts)

 

–   Suspension Mounts: (Conventional & Hydraulic Bushings, Strut Mounts, Spring Seats & Bumpers, Mass Dampers, Dual Durometer (Bi-compound) Bushings)

Our Industry

The automotive industry is one of the world’s largest and most competitive. Consumer demand for new vehicles largely determines sales and production volumes of global OEMs.

The automotive supplier industry is generally characterized by high barriers to entry, significant start-up costs and long-standing customer relationships. The criteria by which OEMs judge automotive suppliers include quality, price, service, performance, design and engineering capabilities, innovation, timely delivery, financial stability and global footprint. Over the last decade, suppliers that have been able to achieve manufacturing scale, reduce structural costs, diversify their customer base and establish a global footprint have been successful.

New vehicle sales are expected to increase in certain regions of the world, particularly in Asia, where we have a strong local market presence. Asia is the largest and fastest growing market for light vehicles in the world.

Competition in the automotive supplier industry is intense and has increased in recent years as OEMs have demonstrated a preference for stronger relationships with fewer suppliers. There are typically three or more significant competitors and numerous smaller competitors for most of the products we produce. Automotive suppliers with a global manufacturing footprint capable of fully servicing customers around the world will continue to lead the supply industry going forward. OEMs have shifted certain research and development, design and testing responsibility to suppliers. At the same time they have shortened new product cycle times. To remain competitive, suppliers must have state-of-the-art engineering and design capabilities and must be able to continuously improve their engineering, design and manufacturing processes to effectively service the customer. Suppliers are increasingly expected to collaborate on, or assume the product design and development of, key automotive components and to provide innovative solutions to meet evolving technologies aimed at improved emissions and fuel economy.

Pricing pressure has continued as competition for market share has reduced the overall profitability of the industry and resulted in continued pressure on suppliers for price reductions. Consolidations and market share shifts among vehicle manufacturers continue to put additional pressures on the supply chain. These pricing and market pressures will continue to drive our focus on reducing our overall cost structure through continuous improvement initiatives, capital redeployment, restructuring and other cost management processes.

The automotive industry is increasingly being shaped by tightening government regulations for vehicle safety, fuel efficiency, and emissions controls. OEMs continue to focus on improving occupant

 

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and pedestrian safety in order to meet increasingly stringent regulatory requirements in various critical markets. Similarly, OEMs must focus on fuel economy and reducing emissions to meet increasingly stringent standards imposed by governmental authorities around the world. As a result, suppliers are increasingly focused on developing technologies and products designed to improve vehicle safety, emissions and fuel economy. Suppliers who can provide product solutions in these areas will realize greater opportunities for above-market growth.

Our Competitive Strengths

Innovative and High Quality Products

We believe we have distinguished ourselves in the automotive industry through our engineering and technological capabilities, as evidenced by our i3 innovations group and the recent development of several key innovative product and technology solutions including our MagAlloy coating process, Quick Connect with integrated sensor technology, ArmorHose product line and our revolutionary new Fortrex material technology. Our innovative products increase the lifespan of automotive components such as fuel and brake lines, improve efficiency in the assembly process and reduce material and weight in vehicles. Over the last three years, we have spent $314.3 million on engineering, research and development to further develop innovative products. We believe our focus on innovation and our delivery of innovative products and solutions provides us with a sustainable competitive advantage.

In addition, we believe we have a reputation for outstanding quality within the automotive industry, a factor that has been important to maintaining and expanding our successful relationships with our customers. We have earned numerous awards, including the DaimlerChrysler Global Supplier Award, GM Supplier of the Year, Ford’s Silver World Excellence Award and Toyota’s Cost Excellence Performance Award.

Global Manufacturing Footprint

We have established an advantaged global manufacturing footprint from which we serve our customers worldwide. Our global operations include 79 facilities which are predominantly utilized for our manufacturing operations. Our operations are located in Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States. Since 2004, we have increased the proportion of our sales outside North America from 30% to 47%, largely reflecting our focus on obtaining and retaining business on high-volume global platforms. As part of our strategy, we operate several successful international joint ventures, which have allowed us to enter into new geographic markets, to establish new customer relationships and to expand our products, technologies and capabilities. Our joint venture partners provide knowledge and insight into local markets and access to local suppliers of raw materials and components. We believe our global manufacturing footprint and proximity to customers provides us with a competitive advantage in the areas of customer service, improved logistics and lower costs.

World-Class Operations/Cooper Standard Operating System

In an ongoing effort to reduce our cost structure, we run a global continuous improvement program, as well as implementation of lean tools, structured problem solving, best business practices, standardized processes and change management.

We also evaluate opportunities to consolidate facilities and to relocate certain operations to lower cost countries. We believe we will continue to be successful in our efforts to improve our design and

 

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engineering capability and manufacturing processes while achieving cost savings due to the flexible nature of our manufacturing capabilities, our highly efficient operations and our ability to leverage economies of scale from the high volumes of products we produce for the world’s top-selling vehicle platforms. We have created a culture of continuous improvement and lean manufacturing in all aspects of our operations. Over the life cycle of each platform, we focus on streamlining manufacturing, increasing automation and reducing material and other costs in an effort to generate additional operational savings. We budget and track operational savings at the facility level, which management regularly reports and reviews.

Strong Customer Relations and Program Management 

We believe that our customer relationships, program management capabilities, global presence, comprehensive product line, excellence in manufacturing, product innovation and quality assurance combine to provide us with significant competitive advantages. We have proven our ability to expand globally with customers, increase scale in a consolidating industry and be first-to-market with design and engineering innovations.

We have a high level of dedication to customer service, and for each major product launch we dedicate a team of sales representatives, engineers, quality specialists and senior management, who work together to ensure that the product launch is completed on time and consistent with rigorous quality standards. These characteristics have allowed us to remain a leading supplier to Ford and GM while steadily growing our business with European and Asian OEMs. Our capabilities are evidenced by our success in being awarded significant content on our customers’ top-selling platforms, including the Ford F-Series and GM’s Silverado, Sierra, Tahoe, Yukon and Escalade vehicle models.

Incumbent Position Across Diverse Customer Base

As the incumbent supplier to platforms, we have typically participated in the design of their successor platforms, and therefore, we believe we have been afforded a competitive advantage to win the upgrade and the ultimate replacement business. In addition, we believe that our presence on our largest customers’ highest-volume and most important platforms is a competitive advantage that allows us to further increase our market share, cross-sell our other product lines, fully leverage our lean initiatives, spread our fixed costs over higher volumes and increase our return on capital.

Experienced Management Team

Our senior management team has extensive background in the automotive industry. Our management team is focused on guiding us through the challenges facing the automotive industry and the changing economic environment through ongoing and continued cost reduction and restructuring initiatives and is intent on continuing to implement our business strategies. For more information on our executive officers, see “Management.”

Adaptable Approach to Global Manufacturing Footprint to Ensure Continued Profitability

We continuously evaluate our global manufacturing footprint to ensure we are optimizing our operations to remain accessible to our customers while driving cost improvement. We are currently in the process of transitioning a significant portion of our manufacturing operations from high-cost to low-cost countries. In Europe, we have transferred many of our manufacturing operations in Western Europe to lower cost countries in Eastern Europe. In addition, we have restructured our European employee base by increasing the percentage of lower cost local employees. Both of these efforts have allowed us to decrease our operating costs and drive increased profitability without sacrificing product quality. In North America, we have added significant production capacity and headcount in Mexico

 

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while maintaining or reducing production capacity in Canada and the United States. Our current forecasts anticipate a continuation of these trends.

Driving Profitable Growth and Cash Flow Generation

We are committed to growing shareholder value by driving profitable growth, increased Adjusted EBITDA, and strong cash flow generation. We continue to drive revenue growth through increased market share and targeted growth in China, and our Adjusted EBITDA margins continue to grow through our restructuring efforts. Since 2013, our Adjusted EBITDA margin has increased from 9.3% to 10.8% for the year ended December 31, 2015. We are also driving increased cash flow through rigorous capital management. Capital expenditure levels are being reduced to levels in line with our industry peers following a period of higher spending which was necessitated by deferred maintenance during the most recent cyclical downturn. In addition, we are focused on reducing working capital through optimizing inventory, receivables and payables.

Our Business Strategy

Our business strategy is to drive for profitable growth, become one of the thirty largest global automotive suppliers in terms of sales, and among the top 5% of global automotive suppliers in terms of return on invested capital (what we refer to as “Top 30 / Top 5”). We are seeking to realize this vision by matching our priorities and strengths to the emerging global industry environment by:

 

    Focusing on core product lines;

 

    Producing superior products as a recognized innovation leader;

 

    Creating an advantaged global manufacturing footprint to support customers;

 

    Commonizing and standardizing world-class engineering and manufacturing operations;

As the Company continues to grow, we will look to further evolve our strategy to create additional opportunities to drive shareholder value.

Operational and Strategic Initiatives

As part of our profitable growth strategy, we implemented the CSOS to fully position the Company for growth and ensure global consistency in engineering design, program management, manufacturing process, purchasing and IT systems. Standardization across all regions is especially critical in support of customers’ global platforms that require the same design, quality and delivery standards everywhere across the world.

 

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The CSOS consists of the following areas, with a strategic focus that aligns with the Company’s growth strategy:

 

CSOS Function

  

Strategic Focus

World-Class Safety    Implement globally consistent measurement system with zero incidents goal.
World-Class Operations    Optimize global performance by implementing best business practices across the organization.
Continuous Improvement    Implement lean manufacturing tools across all facilities to achieve cost savings and increased performance.
Global Purchasing    Develop an advantaged supply base to effectively leverage scale and optimize supplier quality.
Innovation Management    Focused innovation processes to create breakthrough technologies for market differentiation.
Global Program Management    Ensure consistent and flawless product launch process across all regions.
IT Systems    Implement common systems to effectively communicate information throughout the business.

Leverage Technology for Innovative Solutions 

We utilize our technical expertise to provide customers with innovative solutions. Our engineers combine product design with a broad understanding of material characteristics for enhanced vehicle performance. We believe our reputation for successful innovation in product design and materials is the reason our customers consult us early in their vehicle development and design process of their next generation vehicles.

Cooper Standard has evolved and further energized its approach to innovation with its i3 Innovation Process (Imagine, Initiate, Innovate). This approach is used as a mechanism to capture ideas from across our Company and supply partners while promoting a culture of innovation.

Ideas are carefully evaluated by a Global Technology Council and those that are selected are put on an accelerated development cycle with a dedicated innovation team focused on breakthrough ideas. This team is developing innovative technologies based on materials expertise, process know-how, and application vision, which will drive future product direction. Among recently announced technologies is ArmorHose, a breakthrough technology which results in significantly more durable coolant hoses, and eliminates the need for separate abrasion sleeves on under-hood hose assemblies. Several other significant technologies, especially related to advanced materials, processing and weight reduction have recently been realized. These include: Fortrex, a revolutionary material that provides higher performance and lower weight to weather seals; and MagAlloy, a new processing technology for brake lines that increases long term durability through superior corrosion resistance.

Continued Emphasis on Global Platforms

We believe global platforms will drive increased growth for capable global suppliers. Our global presence and technological capabilities ideally position us to win business on global platforms. Based

 

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on our 2015 revenue, six of the top ten vehicle platforms on which we provide content are global platforms, which demonstrates that customers already look to us to support global platforms. It is predicted that the top ten global platforms produced by automakers will account for about 30% of the world’s light vehicle volume by 2021, further highlighting the importance of being well-positioned to participate in these high volume global programs.

Invest In Emerging Markets to Accelerate Growth

We are committed to expanding our presence in Asia. In China, vehicle production is expected to grow at a 4.1% CAGR from 2015 through 2020 to 30 million vehicles. Accordingly, we have accelerated the Company’s sealing business growth and provided additional growth opportunities with domestic Chinese automakers across product lines through the Shenya transaction, which resulted in our 95% majority stake in the largest Chinese automotive sealing supplier. Additionally, our Cooper Standard / INOAC JV has accelerated fluid transfer systems growth and provides additional growth opportunities with Japanese OEMs in China and Southeast Asia. In India, we have launched new sealing and fuel and brake facilities to expand our market leading positions for both product lines. We have also become 100% owner of our existing sealing JV and have expanded our relationship with Sujan Group with a new fluid transfer systems JV. Collectively, these initiatives further develop our global platform to serve our global customer base.

Pursue Acquisitions and Strategic Alliances to Enhance Capabilities and Accelerate Growth

We intend to continue to selectively pursue complementary acquisitions and joint ventures to enhance our customer base, geographic penetration, scale and technology. Consolidation is an industry trend and is encouraged by the OEMs’ desire for global automotive suppliers. We believe we have a strong platform for growth through acquisitions based on our past integration successes, experienced management team, global presence and operational excellence. We currently operate through several successful joint ventures.

Corporate History and Business Developments

Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. was established in 2004 as a Delaware corporation and began operating on December 23, 2004 when it acquired the automotive segment of Cooper Tire & Rubber Company, or the 2004 Acquisition. Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. operates the business primarily through its principal operating subsidiary, Cooper-Standard Automotive Inc., or CSA U.S. Since the 2004 Acquisition, the Company has expanded and diversified its customer base through a combination of organic growth and strategic acquisitions.

In August 2009, following the onset of the financial crisis and economic downturn that severely impacted the global automotive industry, Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries in the United States and Canada commenced reorganization proceedings in the United States, or the Chapter 11 proceedings, and Canada. In May 2010, the Company consummated its reorganization pursuant to a court-confirmed plan of reorganization and emerged from the Chapter 11 proceedings and the Canadian proceedings.

In October 2013, Cooper Standard’s common stock was listed on the NYSE and began trading under the ticker symbol “CPS.” Prior to the NYSE listing, the Company’s common stock was traded on the Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board under the symbol “COSH.”

From 2006 to 2013, the Company accelerated its growth through a number of strategic acquisitions including the Fluid Handling Systems Operations in North America, Europe and China, or collectively, FHS, from ITT Industries, Inc.; Metzeler Automotive Profile Systems; a hose manufacturing

 

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operation in Mexico from the Gates Corporation; USi, Inc.; the sealing business of Sigit S.p.A.; a joint venture with Fonds de Modernisation des Equipementiers Automobiles, or FMEA; and Jyco Sealing Technology.

We continued strategic acquisitions and partnerships in 2014 and 2015 with the acquisition of Cikautxo Borja, S.L.U. in Spain, a manufacturer of heating and cooling hoses; the purchase of an additional 47.5% of Shenya, increasing our equity ownership to 95% and positioning the Company as a leader in sealing systems in the Chinese automotive market; the formation of a joint venture with Polyrub Extrusions (India) Private Limited to grow the Company’s fluid transfer systems business in Asia; and a joint venture with INOAC Corporation of Japan accelerating our fluid transfer systems strategy in Asia.

In 2014 and 2015, the Company divested its thermal and emissions product line and hard coat plastic exterior trim business, respectively, to focus on the product lines where Cooper Standard holds leading market positions.

Customers

We are a leading supplier to the following OEMs and are increasing our presence with major OEMs throughout the world. The following table shows the approximate percentage of sales to our top customers for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014:

 

Customer

   2015     2014  

Ford

     26     24

GM

     16     16

FCA

     12     13

PSA Peugeot Citroën

     5     6

Volkswagen Group

     5     5

Our other customers include OEMs such as Daimler, Renault-Nissan, BMW, Toyota, Volvo, Jaguar/Land Rover, Honda and various other OEMs based in India and China. Approximately 82% of our sales in 2015 were to OEMs. The remaining 18% of our 2015 sales were primarily to Tier I and Tier II automotive suppliers, non-automotive manufacturers, and replacement market distributors. Our business with any given customer is typically split among several contracts for different parts on a number of platforms.

Competition

We believe that the principal competitive factors in our industry are quality, price, service, performance, design and engineering capabilities, innovation, timely delivery, financial stability and global footprint. We believe that our capabilities in these core competencies are integral to our position as a market leader in each of our product lines. Our sealing systems products compete with Toyoda Gosei, Hutchinson, Henniges and Standard Profil, among others. Our fuel and brake delivery products compete with TI Automotive, Sanoh, Martinrea, Maruyasu and Usui. Our fluid transfer products compete with Conti-Tech, Hutchinson, Teklas, Tristone and Hwaseung R&A. Our anti-vibration systems compete with Trelleborg/Vibracoustic, Hutchinson, Tokai Rubber, Bridgestone and ContiTech.

Joint Ventures and Strategic Alliances

Joint ventures represent an important part of our business, both operationally and strategically. We have utilized joint ventures to enter into new geographic markets such as China, India and

 

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Thailand, to acquire new customers and to develop new technologies. In entering new geographic markets, teaming with a local partner can reduce capital investment by leveraging pre-existing infrastructure. In addition, local partners in these markets can provide knowledge and insight into local practices and access to local suppliers of raw materials and components.

The following table shows our significant unconsolidated joint ventures:

 

Country

  

Name

   Ownership 
Percentage
 

China

   Shenya Sealing (Guangzhou) Company Limited      51

India

   Sujan Cooper Standard AVS Private Limited      50

United States

   Nishikawa Cooper LLC      40

India

   Polyrub Cooper Standard FTS Private Limited      35

Thailand

   Nishikawa Tachaplalert Cooper Ltd.      20

Research and Development

We have a dedicated team of technical and engineering resources in each global region, some of which are located at our customers’ facilities. We utilize Design for Six Sigma and other methodologies that emphasize manufacturability and quality. Our development teams work closely with our customers to design and deliver innovative solutions. We continue to add technical resources throughout the world as required to support our customers, including a technical center in Shanghai, China and, with the Sujan Cooper Standard joint venture, in Maharashtra, India. We spent $108.8 million, $102.0 million, and $103.5 million in 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively, on engineering, research and development.

Patents and Trademarks

We believe that one of our key competitive advantages is our ability to translate customer need into innovative solutions through the development of intellectual property. We hold a significant number of patents and trademarks worldwide. Our patents relate to our product lines and are grouped into two major categories: (1) specific product invention claims and (2) specific manufacturing processes that are used for producing products. The vast majority of our patents fall within the product invention category. We consider these patents to be of value and seek to protect our rights throughout the world against infringement. While in the aggregate these patents are important to our business, we do not believe that the loss or expiration of any one patent would materially affect our Company. We continue to seek patent protection for our new products and have an incentive program to recognize employees whose inventions are patented. Additionally, we develop significant technologies that we treat as trade secrets and choose not to disclose to the public through the patent process, but which nonetheless provide significant competitive advantages and contribute to our global leadership position in various markets. We believe that our trademarks, including ArmorHose, Ultra Pro Coat, MagAlloy and Fortrex, help differentiate us and lead customers to seek our partnership.

We also have technology sharing and licensing agreements with various third parties, including Nishikawa Rubber Company, one of our joint venture partners in sealing products. We have mutual agreements with Nishikawa Rubber Company for sales, marketing and engineering services on certain sealing products. Under those agreements, each party pays for services provided by the other and royalties on certain products for which the other party provides design or development services.

 

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Supplies and Raw Materials

The principal raw materials for our business include EPDM and synthetic rubber, components manufactured from carbon steel, plastic resins and components, carbon black, process oils, components manufactured from aluminum and natural rubber. Raw material prices have fluctuated greatly in recent years. We have implemented strategies with both our suppliers and our customers to help manage fluctuations in raw material prices. These actions include material substitutions and leveraging global purchases. Global supply chain optimization includes using benchmarks and selective sourcing from low cost regions. We have also made process improvements to ensure the efficient use of materials through scrap reduction, as well as standardization of material specifications to maximize leverage over higher volume purchases. With some customers, on certain raw materials, we have implemented indexes that allow price changes as underlying material costs fluctuate.

Seasonality

Historically, sales to automotive customers are lowest during the months prior to model changeovers and during assembly plant shutdowns. However, economic conditions and consumer demand may change the traditional seasonality of the industry and lower production may prevail without the impact of seasonality. In the past, model changeover periods have typically resulted in lower sales volumes during July, August and December. During these periods of lower sales volumes, profit may decline but working capital often improves due to the continued collection of accounts receivable.

Backlog

Our OEM sales are generally based upon purchase orders issued by the OEMs, with updated releases for volume adjustments, and as such we typically do not have a backlog of orders at any point in time. Once selected to supply products for a particular platform, we typically supply those products for the platform life, which is normally three to five years, although there is no guarantee that this will occur. In addition, when we are the incumbent supplier to a given platform, we believe we have a competitive advantage in winning the redesign or replacement platform.

Employees

As of December 31, 2015, we had more than 29,000 full-time and temporary employees. We maintain good relations with both our union and non-union employees and, in the past ten years, have not experienced any major work stoppages. We renegotiated some of our domestic and non-domestic union agreements in 2015 and have several contracts set to expire in the next twelve months. As of December 31, 2015, approximately 28% of our employees were represented by unions, and approximately 9% of the unionized employees were located in the United States.

Environmental

We are subject to a broad range of federal, state, and local environmental and occupational safety and health laws and regulations in the United States and other countries, including regulations governing: emissions to air, discharges to water, noise and odor emissions; the generation, handling, storage, transportation, treatment, reclamation and disposal of chemicals and waste materials; the cleanup of contaminated properties; and human health and safety. We have made and will continue to make expenditures to comply with environmental requirements. While our costs to defend and settle known claims arising under environmental laws are not currently estimated to be material, such costs

 

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may be material in the future. For example, as of December 31, 2015, we have $6,384,000 reserved on our consolidated balance sheet on an undiscounted basis for remediation at certain of our sites. Remediation costs are difficult to accurately predict and actual costs could exceed current estimates. The discovery of additional contamination or the imposition of additional remediation obligations at these or other sites in the future also could result in additional costs to us. In addition, at some of our current and former sites, remediation of historical contamination is being addressed and/or funded by third-parties pursuant to indemnification obligations associated with past transactions. Although we do not currently expect to incur material costs in connection with such sites, any failure by such parties to meet their indemnification obligations could result in additional costs to us.

Properties

As of December 31, 2015, our operations were conducted through 98 wholly-owned, leased and joint venture facilities in 20 countries (North America: Canada, Mexico, United States; Asia Pacific: China, India, Japan, South Korea, Thailand; Europe: Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom; South America: Brazil), of which 79 are predominantly manufacturing facilities and 19 have design, engineering, administrative or logistics designation(s). Our corporate headquarters are located in Novi, Michigan. Our manufacturing facilities are located in North America, Europe, Asia and South America. We believe that substantially all of our properties are in generally good condition and there is sufficient capacity to meet current and projected manufacturing, product development and logistics requirements. The following table summarizes our key property holdings by geographic region:

 

Region

  

Type

   Total Facilities*      Owned Facilities  

North America

   Manufacturing(a)      30         23   
   Other(b)      7         1   

Asia Pacific

   Manufacturing      23         12   
   Other(b)      4         —     

Europe

   Manufacturing(a)      22         18   
   Other(b)      7         3   

South America

   Manufacturing      4         1   
   Other(b)      1         —     

 

(a) Includes multi-activity sites which are predominantly manufacturing.
(b) Includes design, engineering, administrative and logistics locations.
(*) Excludes 6 unutilized (owned) facilities: (2) Europe; (4) North America

Legal Proceedings

We are periodically involved in claims, litigation and various legal matters that arise in the ordinary course of business. In addition, we conduct and monitor environmental investigations and remedial actions at certain locations. Each of these matters is subject to various uncertainties, and some of these matters may be resolved unfavorably for us. If appropriate, we establish a reserve estimate for each matter and update such estimates as additional information becomes available. We do not believe that the ultimate resolution of any of these matters will have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

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MANAGEMENT

Below is a list of our executive officers and directors, their respective ages and a brief account of the business experience of each of them.

 

Name

  Age  

Position

Jeffrey S. Edwards

  53   Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Matthew W. Hardt

  48   Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Keith D. Stephenson

  55   Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

Juan Fernando de Miguel Posada

  58   Corporate Senior Vice President and President, Europe and South America

Song Min Lee

  56   Corporate Senior Vice President and President, Asia Pacific

D. William Pumphrey, Jr.

  56   Corporate Senior Vice President and President, North America

Aleksandra A. Miziolek

  59   Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary

Larry E. Ott

  56   Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer

Jonathan P. Banas

  45   Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer

Sharon S. Wenzl

  56   Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications and Community Affairs

Glenn R. August

  54   Director

Sean O. Mahoney

  53   Director

David J. Mastrocola

  54   Director

Justin E. Mirro

  47   Director

Robert J. Remenar

  60   Director

Thomas W. Sidlik

  66   Director

Stephen A. Van Oss

  61   Director

Executive Officers

Jeffrey S. Edwards is our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, a position he has held since May 2013, previously serving as Chief Executive Officer and member of the Board of Directors of the Company since October 2012. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Edwards gained more than 28 years of automotive industry experience through various positions of increasing responsibility at Johnson Controls, Inc. He led the Automotive Experience Asia Group, serving as Corporate Vice President, Group Vice President and General Manager from 2004 to 2012. Prior to this, he served as Group Vice President and General Manager for Automotive Experience North America from 2002 to 2004. Mr. Edwards completed an executive training program at INSEAD and earned a BS from Clarion University. Mr. Edwards is a member of the Executive Committee of the National Association of Manufacturers and a member of Board of Directors since April 2013. He has also served on the Board of Directors of Standex International Corp. since October 2014.

Matthew W. Hardt is our Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, a position he has held since March 2015. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Hardt served as Senior Vice President, Finance, Industrial Solutions from 2012 to 2014 and Consumer and Industrial Solutions from 2010 to 2012 at TE Connectivity LTD (previously Tyco Electronics). Mr. Hardt served as Vice President, Finance for TE Connectivity LTD’s Specialty Products Group from 2009 to 2010. He previously served in multiple finance and audit roles of increasing responsibility at General Electric Co., including Chief Financial Officer for a number of the company’s global divisions. Mr. Hardt earned a Bachelor of Science degree in finance from Siena College.

 

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Keith D. Stephenson is our Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, a position he has held since January 2014, previously serving as Chief Operating Officer since December 2010. He served as President, International from March 2009 to December 2010. He served as President, Global Body & Chassis Systems from June 2007 to March 2009. Mr. Stephenson was Chief Development Officer at Boler Company from January 2004 until October 2006. From 1985 to January 2004, he held various senior positions at Hendrickson, a division of Boler Company, including President of International Operations, Senior Vice President of Global Business Operations and President of the Truck Systems Group. Mr. Stephenson earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at North Central College.

Juan Fernando de Miguel Posada is our Corporate Senior Vice President and President, Europe and South America, a position he has held since January 2014, previously serving as President, Europe since March 2013. Mr. de Miguel served as western European Chief Executive Officer of Avincis Emergency Services from September 2012 until joining the Company. From May 2011 to September 2012, he served as Consulting President for Europe for Argo Consulting. Mr. de Miguel served as managing director of the Paper Division of SAICA in Spain from 2009 to 2011. From 2007 to 2009, he served as President of the Protective Packaging division of Pregis in Belgium. Mr. de Miguel served as Senior Vice President of Northern Europe for Alstom Transport in France from 2006 to 2007. Previously, Mr. de Miguel held numerous senior level positions at Johnson Controls, Inc., beginning in 1988, ultimately serving as Group Vice President and General Manager, Electronics, Europe and International. Mr. de Miguel received an electrical engineering degree and a Master’s Degree in industrial engineering from Universidad Politecnica de Barcelona, as well as an Executive Master’s degree in Business Administration from the IESE Business School – University of Navarra in Spain.

Song Min Lee is our Corporate Senior Vice President and President, Asia Pacific, a position he has held since January 2014, previously serving as President, Asia Pacific since January 2013. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Lee served as Vice President and General Manager of Johnson Controls, Inc. from 2007 to 2012. From 2006 to 2007, Mr. Lee served as Vice President and President, Korea, for Autoliv, Inc. Mr. Lee served as Plant Manager for Lear Corporation from 2004 to 2006 and held various engineering positions at Ford Motor Company from 1994 to 2004. Mr. Lee completed the Advanced Management Program at Seoul National University. Mr. Lee also earned a Masters of Science in Management Technology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Washburn University.

D. William Pumphrey, Jr. is our Corporate Senior Vice President and President, North America, a position he has held since January 2014, previously serving as President, North America since August 2011. Mr. Pumphrey served as President, Americas for Tower Automotive from 2008 through August 2011. From 2005 to 2008, he served as President of Tower’s North America operations. From 1999 to 2004, Mr. Pumphrey held various positions at Lear Corporation in Southfield, Michigan, ultimately serving as President of the company’s Asia Pacific operations. Mr. Pumphrey earned an MBA from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Arts from Kenyon College.

Aleksandra A. Miziolek is our Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, a position she has held since February 2014. Previously, Ms. Miziolek was the Director of the Automotive Industry Group of Dykema Gossett, PLLC, a national law firm, from 2010. From 2003 to 2010, Ms. Miziolek served on Dykema’s Executive Board and as the Director of its Business Services Department. Ms. Miziolek joined Dykema in 1982 after serving as a law clerk for the Honorable James P. Churchill in the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Michigan, Southern Division. Ms. Miziolek received her JD from Wayne State University Law School and received a Bachelor of Arts from Wayne State University.

Larry E. Ott is our Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer, a position he has held since January 2014, previously serving as Vice President, Global Human Resources since

 

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August 2013. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Ott served as Senior Vice President, Human Resources for Meritor, Inc. from 2010 until 2013. Prior to this, he held a similar position at Ally Financial Inc. from 2006 until July 2010. Mr. Ott spent 20 years at General Motors in a variety of progressive human resources functions. Mr. Ott earned an MBA with a concentration in Organizational Behavior and Industrial Relations from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration and English from the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point.

Jonathan P. Banas is our Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer, a position he has held since September 2015. Prior to joining Cooper Standard, Mr. Banas served as Director, Financial Reporting of ZF TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. (formerly TRW Automotive Holdings Corp.) from 2010 to 2015. Prior to this role, Mr. Banas served as Senior Manager of Financial Planning and Analysis from 2007 to 2010 and of Financial Reporting and Technical Accounting from 2004 to 2007 at TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. Previously, Mr. Banas held corporate accounting and financial reporting roles with Hayes Lemmerz International, Inc. from 2003 to 2004, was President of 664 Consulting Group, PC from 2000 to 2003 and was Manager, Audit and Assurance at KPMG LLP from 1994 to 1999. Mr. Banas is a certified public accountant and earned an MBA with a concentration in Finance and Accounting from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Accounting from Wayne State University.

Sharon S. Wenzl is our Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications and Community Affairs, a position she has held since January 2016. Previously, she was Vice President Corporate Communications, a position she held since joining the company in 2007. Prior to joining Cooper Standard, from 2006 to 2007, Ms. Wenzl was the Principal / Owner of Laramie Group. From 2004 to 2006, she served as Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources and Communications for Tower Automotive. From 1990 to 2004, she held various positions of increasing responsibility at Freudenberg-NOK, most recently serving as Vice President, Human Resources and Corporate Relations. Ms. Wenzl earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Michigan State University and a Master of Arts degree in Communications from Eastern Michigan University. She also attended Boston University’s Public Communications Institute as part of her post graduate work.

Directors

Glenn R. August has been a Director of the Company since October 2014, and currently serves as Chairman of the Compensation Committee and as a member of the Governance Committee. He formerly served on the Company’s Board from May 2010 until May 2011. Mr. August has overall management responsibility for Oak Hill Advisors, an alternative investment firm, and serves as global head of the firm’s distressed and investment activities. He co-founded the predecessor investment firm to Oak Hill Advisors in 1987 and took over responsibility for the firm’s credit and distressed investment activities in 1990. Mr. August co-founded each of Oak Hill Advisors’ funds, where he currently serves as the managing partner of each of their management entities. He previously worked in the mergers and acquisitions department at Morgan Stanley in New York and London. He currently serves as the chairman of the board of directors of OHA Investment Corporation, a publicly traded business development company. Mr. August also serves on the board of directors of the 92nd St. Y and on the Board of Trustees of Horace Mann School and The Mount Sinai Medical Center. Mr. August previously served as a director at iStar Financial Inc. Mr. August earned a Master of Business Administration from Harvard Business School, where he was a Baker Scholar, and a Bachelor of Science from Cornell University.

Sean O. Mahoney has been a Director of the Company since May 2015, and currently serves as a member of the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors. Mr. Mahoney is a private investor with over two decades of experience in investment banking and finance. Mr. Mahoney currently serves as a

 

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consultant to Silver Point Capital. Mr. Mahoney spent 17 years in investment banking at Goldman, Sachs & Co., where he was a partner and the head of the Financial Sponsors Group, followed by four years at Deutsche Bank Securities where he served as vice chairman, global banking. During his banking career, Mr. Mahoney acted as an advisor to companies across a broad range of industries and product areas. In addition to his public company board memberships on the boards of Delphi Automotive PLC and Alcoa Inc., Mr. Mahoney has served on the post-bankruptcy board of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. since 2012 and the board of Formula One Holdings since 2014. He earned his graduate degree from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and his undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago.

David J. Mastrocola has been a Director of the Company since May 2010 and Lead Director since January 2011. Mr. Mastrocola is a former partner and managing director of Goldman, Sachs & Co., a global investment banking, securities and investment management firm, where he worked from 1987 until 2009. During that period, Mr. Mastrocola held a number of senior management positions in the Investment Banking Division, including heading or co-heading the corporate finance, mergers/strategic advisory and industrials/natural resources departments. Mr. Mastrocola also served as a member of Goldman, Sachs & Co.’s firm-wide capital and commitments committees. From 1983 to 1985, Mr. Mastrocola was a senior auditor at Arthur Andersen & Co. Mr. Mastrocola currently serves as a Partner and Advisory Chairman of Pleasant Lake Partners LLC. Mr. Mastrocola previously served on the board of directors of Famous Dave’s of America, Inc. He earned his Master of Business Administration from Harvard University and his undergraduate degree from Boston College.

Justin E. Mirro has been a Director of the Company since May 2015, and currently serves as a member of the Governance Committee of our Board of Directors. Mr. Mirro is an operating partner at Wynnchurch Capital, Ltd. Mr. Mirro joined Wynnchurch in March 2015 as an advisor in the investment development group. He is the founder and president of Kensington Capital Partners LLC since January 2015. Mr. Mirro has over 19 years of automotive investment banking experience, most recently as a managing director and head of automotive investment banking at RBC Capital Markets from June 2011 to December 2014. Prior to that, Mr. Mirro was head of automotive investment banking at Moelis & Company from August 2008 to May 2011, and he was also head of North American automotive investment banking at Jefferies & Company from March 2005 to July 2008. Prior to his investment banking career, Mr. Mirro worked as an engineer for General Motors and Toyota. Mr. Mirro earned his Masters of Business Administration from New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, and his undergraduate degree from The University of Michigan, College of Engineering.

Robert J. Remenar has been a Director of the Company since May 2015, and currently serves as a member of the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors. Mr. Remenar served as the president and chief executive officer of Chassix Inc. from July 2012 to June 2014, and from December 2010 to June 2012 he served as the president and chief executive officer of Nexteer Automotive. From April 2002 to November 2012, Mr. Remenar served as the president of Delphi Steering/Nexteer Automotive. Mr. Remenar held diverse executive positions within Delphi Corporation from 1998 to 2002 and several executive and managerial positions within General Motors from 1985 to 1998. Mr. Remenar currently serves on the board of directors of PKC Group Plc. Mr. Remenar earned his Masters of Business and Professional Accountancy from Walsh College and his undergraduate degree from Central Michigan University.

Thomas W. Sidlik has been a Director of the Company since January 2014, and currently serves as Chairman of the Governance Committee and as a member of the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors. In 2007, Mr. Sidlik retired from the DaimlerChrysler AG Board of Management in Germany after a 34-year career in the automotive industry. He previously served as chairman and CEO of Chrysler Financial Corporation, chairman of the Michigan Minority Business Development Council and vice chairman of the National Minority Supplier Development Council. Mr. Sidlik has been on the board

 

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of directors of Delphi Automotive PLC and Delphi Automotive LLP since 2009. Previously he served on the Board of Regents of Eastern Michigan University, where he served as vice chairman and chairman of the board. He earned his Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Chicago and his undergraduate degree from New York University.

Stephen A. Van Oss has been a Director of the Company since August 2008, and currently serves as Chairman of the Audit Committee and as a member of the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors. Mr. Van Oss was the senior vice president and chief operating officer of WESCO International, Inc., a leading distributor of electrical construction and industrial maintenance products, a position he held from September 2009 until his retirement in December 2015. He has served as a director of WESCO from 2008 to 2015. From 2004 to 2009, Mr. Van Oss served as senior vice president and chief financial and administrative officer of WESCO. From 2000 to 2004, he served as vice president and chief financial officer of WESCO. He served as WESCO’s director, information technology from 1997 to 2000 and as its director, acquisition management in 1997. He serves as a trustee of Robert Morris University and chairs its finance committee and is a member of its governance committee. Mr. Van Oss also previously served on the board of directors of William Scotsman International, Inc. He earned his graduate degree from Cleveland State University, undergraduate degree from Wright State University and is a Certified Public Accountant licensed in Ohio.

 

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SELLING STOCKHOLDERS

The following table sets forth the name of selling stockholders, the beneficial ownership of our common stock by the selling stockholders as of March 10, 2016, the number of shares of our common stock being offered by the selling stockholders pursuant to this prospectus supplement and the number of shares of our common stock that will be beneficially owned by the selling stockholders immediately after the offering contemplated by this prospectus supplement.

The percentages of beneficial ownership set forth below are based on 17,221,087 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding as of March 10, 2016, after giving effect to the assumed purchase by us of $25 million of shares at the purchase price of $77.60 per share, which is the last sale price of our common stock on the NYSE on March 11, 2016, or 322,164 shares, and the retirement of such shares upon purchase by us. The actual number of shares to be purchased by us will depend on market conditions and other factors. Such number of issued and outstanding shares of common stock does not include shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of the warrants to purchase common stock outstanding, vesting of restricted stock units or stock-settled performance units at target or exercise of options to purchase our common stock issued pursuant to our 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules and regulations of the SEC. These rules generally attribute beneficial ownership of shares to persons who possess sole or shared voting or investment power with respect to such shares. The information does not necessarily indicate beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under these rules, the number of shares of common stock deemed outstanding includes shares issuable upon exercise of options or warrants held by the respective person or group which may be exercised or converted within 60 days after March 10, 2016. These shares are deemed to be outstanding and beneficially owned by the person holding those options or warrants for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of that person or entity, but they are not treated as outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person or entity. Except as indicated by the footnotes below, we believe, based on the information furnished to us, that the persons and entities named in the tables below have sole voting power and investment power with respect to all shares of common stock that they beneficially own, subject to applicable community property laws.

Information below with respect to beneficial ownership (excluding percentage) has been furnished by the selling stockholders and we have not sought to verify such information. Except as stated in the footnotes below, none of the selling stockholders or their affiliates, officers, directors and principal equity holders have held any position or office or have had any material relationship with us or our affiliates within the past three years.

 

Selling Stockholder

  Shares Beneficially
Owned Prior to
This Offering
    Without Underwriters’
Purchase Option
    With Full Exercise of
Underwriters’ Purchase Option
 
    Shares
Being
Offered
Hereby
    Shares Beneficially
Owned After This
Offering and Share
Purchase
    Shares
Being
Offered
Hereby
    Shares Beneficially
Owned After This
Offering and Share
Purchase
 
    Number     Percent     Number     Number     Percent     Number     Number     Percent  

Silver Point Capital
Funds(1)

    5,273,444        30.6     987,598        4,285,846        24.9     1,135,737        4,137,707        24

Funds and Accounts Managed by Oak Hill Advisors, L.P.(2)

    2,655,251        15.4     512,402        2,142,849        12.4     589,262        2,065,989        12.0

American High-Income Trust(3)(6)

    947,905        5.5     396,274        551,631        3.2     455,715        492,190        2.9

American Funds Insurance Series – Asset Allocation Fund(4)(6)

    125,000        0.7     55,069        69,931        0.4     63,329        61,671        0.4

American Funds Insurance Series – High-Income Bond Fund(5)(6)

    110,446        0.6     48,657        61,789        0.4     55,956        54,490        0.3

 

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(1) The Silver Point Capital Funds are managed by Silver Point Capital, L.P., or SPC, and are comprised of the following entities: Silver Point Capital Fund, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, or “SPC Onshore,” and Silver Point Capital Offshore Master Fund, L.P., or SPC Offshore, a Cayman Islands exempted limited partnership. The Silver Point Capital Funds own 5,273,444 shares of common stock (which includes 562,993 shares of our common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants), of which 1,581,451 shares are held by SPC Onshore and 3,691,993 shares are held by SPC Offshore. SPC is the investment manager of the Silver Point Capital Funds and by virtue of such status may be deemed to be the beneficial owner of the shares of our common stock held by the Silver Point Capital Funds. Silver Point Capital Management, LLC, or SPC Management, is the general partner of SPC and as a result may be deemed to be the beneficial owner of the shares of our common stock held by the Silver Point Capital Funds. Each of Edward A. Mulé and Robert J. O’Shea is a member of SPC Management and has voting and investment power with respect to the shares of our common stock held by the Silver Point Capital Funds. As such, Mr. Mulé and Mr. O’Shea may be deemed to be beneficial owners of the shares of our common stock held by the Silver Point Funds. All shares indicated as owned by Mr. Mulé or Mr. O’Shea are included because of their affiliation with SPC Management, SPC and the Silver Point Capital Funds. The address for SPC Management, SPC and the Silver Point Capital Funds is c/o Silver Point Capital, L.P., Two Greenwich Plaza, 1st Floor, Greenwich, Connecticut 06830. The number of shares of our common stock being offered includes 107,457 shares by SPC Onshore and 880,141 by SPC Offshore. Should the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares be exercised, the Silver Point Capital Funds will provide up to 148,139 shares of common stock to be sold pursuant to this option.
(2) Funds and Accounts Managed by Oak Hill Advisors, L.P., or OHA, are comprised of the following entities: (1) Oak Hill Credit Opportunities Master Fund, Ltd., or OHCOF, (2) OHA Strategic Credit Master Fund, L.P., or SCF, (3) OHA Strategic Credit Master Fund IB, L.P., or SCF IB, (4) Lerner Enterprises, LLC, or Lerner, and (5) Future Fund Board of Guardians, or FF. The amount shown includes: (i) 206,276 shares of common stock held by OHCOF; (ii) 1,558,720 shares of common stock held by SCF; (iii) 149,701 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of warrants held by SCF; (iv) 430,197 shares of common stock held by SCF IB; (v) 29,834 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of warrants held by SCF IB; (vi) 141,129 shares of common stock held by Lerner; (vii) 7,263 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of warrants held by Lerner; (viii) 107,633 shares of common stock held by FF and (ix) 24,498 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of warrants held by FF. OHA Strategic Credit GenPar, LLC, or SCF GenPar, is the general partner of SCF and SCF IB, and may be deemed to beneficially own the shares of our common stock owned by SCF and SCF IB and deemed to have power to vote or direct the vote of, and the power to dispose or to direct the disposition of, the shares of common stock owned by SCF and SCF IB. Oak Hill Credit Opportunities Management, LLC, or OHCOM LLC, is an advisor to OHCOF and may be deemed to beneficially own the shares of common stock owned by OHCOF and may be deemed to have the power to vote or direct the vote of, and the power to dispose or to direct the disposition of, the shares of common stock owned by OHCOF. OHA is the advisor to OHCOF, SCF and SCF IB and wholly owns and is the managing member of OHCOM LLC. As advisor to OHCOF, SCF and SCF IB, OHA may be deemed to beneficially own the shares of common stock owned by OHCOF, SCF and SCF IB and may be deemed to have the power to vote or direct the vote of, and the power to dispose or to direct the disposition of, the shares of common stock owned by OHCOF, SCF and SCF IB. OHA is also an advisor to the managed accounts of Lerner and FF. As an advisor to the managed accounts, OHA may be deemed to beneficially own the shares of common stock owned by the managed accounts and may be deemed to have the power to vote or direct the vote of, and the power to dispose or to direct the disposition of, the shares of common stock owned by the managed accounts. OHA may be deemed to beneficially own equity awards made by the Company in respect of board services by persons affiliated with OHA, including 4,408 shares of vested restricted stock, 9,731 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of stock options and unvested restricted stock units representing contingent rights to receive 1,285 shares of common stock held by persons affiliated with OHA, which are not included in the ownership information in this section. Oak Hill Advisors GenPar, L.P., or OHA GenPar, is the general partner of OHA and may be deemed to beneficially own the shares of common stock beneficially owned by OHA and deemed to have the power to vote or direct the vote of, and the power to dispose or to direct the disposition of, the shares of common stock beneficially owned by OHA. Oak Hill Advisors MGP, Inc., or OHA MGP, is the managing general partner of OHA GenPar and may be deemed to beneficially own the shares of common stock beneficially owned by OHA GenPar and may be deemed to have the power to vote or direct the vote of, and the power to dispose or to direct the disposition of, the shares of common stock beneficially owned by OHA GenPar. OHCOF, SCF, SCF IB, SCF GenPar, OHA GenPar, OHA, OHCOM LLC and OHA MGP are managed or otherwise controlled directly or indirectly by Glenn R. August, our director, who is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of OHA. Mr. August disclaims beneficial ownership of all shares of the common stock in excess of his pecuniary interests, if any. The address for OHA GenPar, OHCOF, SCF, SCF IB, Lerner, FF, SCF GenPar, OHA GenPar, OHA, OHCOM LLC and OHA MGP is c/o Oak Hill Advisors, L.P., 1114 Avenue of the Americas, 27th Floor, New York, New York 10036. The number of shares of our common stock being offered includes: (i) 39,797 shares held by OHCOF, (ii) 329,694 shares held by SCF, (iii) 88,771 shares held by SCF IB, (iv) 28,634 shares held by Lerner and (v) 25,506 shares held by FF. Should the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares be exercised, up to (i) 5,969 shares held by OHCOF, (ii) 49,454 shares held by SCF, (iii) 13,316 shares held by SCF IB, (iv) 4,295 shares held by Lerner and (v) 3,826 shares held by FF may be sold pursuant to this option.

 

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(3) American High-Income Trust, or AHIT, has sole voting and investment power with respect to 947,905 shares of common stock, including 48,411 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants. The number of shares of our common stock being offered includes 396,274 shares held by AHIT. Should the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares be exercised, up to 59,441 shares held by AHIT may be sold pursuant to this option.
(4) American Funds Insurance Series – Asset Allocation Fund, or VIAA, has sole voting and investment power with respect to 125,000 shares of common stock. The number of shares of our common stock being offered includes 55,069 shares held by VIAA. Should the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares be exercised, up to 8,260 shares held by VIAA may be sold pursuant to this option.
(5) American Funds Insurance Series – High-Income Bond Fund, or VIHIB, has sole voting and investment power with respect to 110,446 shares of common stock. The number of shares of our common stock being offered includes 48,657 shares held by VIHIB. Should the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares be exercised, up to 7,299 shares held by VIHIB may be sold pursuant to this option.
(6) Capital Research and Management Company, or CRMC, is the investment adviser for AHIT, VIAA and VIHIB. For purposes of the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, Capital World Investors, or CWI, an equity investment division of CRMC, may be deemed to be the beneficial owner of all of the shares of our common stock held by AHIT, VIAA and VIHIB. However, each of CRMC and CWI expressly disclaims that it is, in fact, the beneficial owner of such shares. CRMC is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The address for CRMC and for the selling stockholder is 333 South Hope Street, 55th floor, Los Angeles, California 90071.

 

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MATERIAL UNITED STATES FEDERAL INCOME AND ESTATE TAX CONSEQUENCES TO

NON-U.S. HOLDERS

The following is a summary of material United States federal income and estate tax consequences to a non-U.S. holder (as defined below) of the purchase, ownership and disposition of our common stock purchased in this offering. Except where noted, this summary deals only with common stock that is held as a capital asset within the meaning of Section 1221 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code.

A “non-U.S. holder” means any beneficial owner of our common stock (other than an entity treated as a partnership for United States federal income tax purposes) that is not for United States federal income tax purposes any of the following:

 

    an individual citizen or resident of the United States;

 

    a corporation (or any other entity treated as a corporation for United States federal income tax purposes) created or organized in or under the laws of the United States, any state thereof or the District of Columbia;

 

    an estate the income of which is subject to United States federal income taxation regardless of its source; or

 

    a trust if it (1) is subject to the primary supervision of a court within the United States and one or more United States persons have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust or (2) has a valid election in effect under applicable United States Treasury regulations to be treated as a United States person.

A modified definition of “non-U.S. holder” applies for United States federal estate tax purposes (as discussed below).

This summary is based upon provisions of the Code and United States Treasury regulations, rulings and judicial decisions, in each case in effect as of the date hereof. Those authorities may be changed or be subject to differing interpretations, perhaps retroactively, so as to result in United States federal income and estate tax consequences different from those summarized below and which may adversely affect a non-U.S. holder of our common stock. This summary does not address all aspects of United States federal income and estate taxes and does not deal with foreign, state, local or other tax considerations that may be relevant to non-U.S. holders in light of their particular circumstances (including the Medicare contribution tax on net investment income). In addition, it does not represent a detailed description of the United States federal income tax consequences applicable to you if you are subject to special treatment under the United States federal income tax laws (including if you are a United States expatriate, “controlled foreign corporation,” “passive foreign investment company,” or a partnership or other pass-through entity for United States federal income tax purposes). We cannot assure you that a change in law will not alter significantly the tax considerations that we describe in this summary.

If an entity treated as a partnership for United States federal income tax purposes holds our common stock, the tax treatment of a partner will generally depend upon the status of the partner and the activities of the partnership. If you are a partner of a partnership holding our common stock, you should consult your own tax advisors.

If you are considering the purchase of our common stock, you should consult your own tax advisors concerning the particular United States federal income and estate tax consequences to you of the purchase, ownership and disposition of the common stock, as well as the consequences to you arising under the laws of any other taxing jurisdiction.

 

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Dividends

In the event that we make a distribution of cash or other property (other than certain pro rata distributions of our stock) in respect of our common stock, the distribution generally will be treated as a dividend for United States federal income tax purposes to the extent it is paid from our current or accumulated earnings and profits, as determined under United States federal income tax principles. Any portion of a distribution that exceeds our current and accumulated earnings and profits generally will be treated first as a tax-free return of capital, causing a reduction in the adjusted tax basis of a non-U.S. holder’s common stock, and to the extent the amount of the distribution exceeds a non-U.S. holder’s adjusted tax basis in our common stock, the excess will be treated as gain from the disposition of our common stock (the tax treatment of which is discussed below under “—Gain on Disposition of Common Stock”).

Dividends paid to a non-U.S. holder of our common stock generally will be subject to withholding of United States federal income tax at a 30% rate or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income tax treaty. However, dividends that are effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business by the non-U.S. holder within the United States (and, if required by an applicable income tax treaty, are attributable to a United States permanent establishment) are not subject to the withholding tax, provided that the non-U.S. holder provides a properly executed Internal Revenue Service Form W-8ECI (or other applicable form) in accordance with the applicable certification and disclosure requirements. Instead, such dividends are subject to United States federal income tax on a net income basis generally in the same manner as if the non-U.S. holder were a United States person as defined under the Code. Any such effectively connected dividends received by a foreign corporation may be subject to an additional “branch profits tax” at a 30% rate or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income tax treaty.

A non-U.S. holder of our common stock who wishes to claim the benefit of an applicable treaty rate and avoid backup withholding, as discussed below, for dividends will be required (a) to provide the applicable withholding agent with a properly executed Internal Revenue Service Form W-8BEN or Form W-8BEN-E (or other applicable form) certifying under penalty of perjury that such holder is not a United States person as defined under the Code and is eligible for treaty benefits or (b) if our common stock is held through certain foreign intermediaries, to satisfy the relevant certification requirements of applicable United States Treasury regulations. Special certification and other requirements apply to certain non-U.S. holders that are pass-through entities rather than corporations or individuals.

A non-U.S. holder of our common stock eligible for a reduced rate of United States withholding tax pursuant to an income tax treaty may obtain a refund of any excess amounts withheld by timely filing an appropriate claim for refund with the Internal Revenue Service.

Gain on Disposition of Common Stock

Subject to the discussion of backup withholding and FATCA below, any gain realized by a non-U.S. holder on the taxable disposition of our common stock generally will not be subject to United States federal income tax unless:

 

    the gain is effectively connected with a trade or business of the non-U.S. holder in the United States (and, if required by an applicable income tax treaty, is attributable to a United States permanent establishment of the non-U.S. holder);

 

    the non-U.S. holder is an individual who is present in the United States for 183 days or more in the taxable year of that disposition, and certain other conditions are met; or

 

    we are or have been a “United States real property holding corporation” for United States federal income tax purposes and certain other conditions are met.

 

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A non-U.S. holder described in the first bullet point immediately above generally will be subject to tax on the net gain derived from the disposition in the same manner as if the non-U.S. holder were a United States person as defined under the Code. In addition, if any non-U.S. holder described in the first bullet point immediately above is a foreign corporation, the gain realized by such non-U.S. holder may be subject to an additional “branch profits tax” at a 30% rate or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income tax treaty. An individual non-U.S. holder described in the second bullet point immediately above generally will be subject to a flat 30% (or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income tax treaty) tax on the gain derived from the disposition, which gain may be offset by United States source capital losses, even though the individual is not considered a resident of the United States.

Although there can be no assurance, we believe we are not and do not anticipate becoming a “United States real property holding corporation” for United States federal income tax purposes.

Federal Estate Tax

Our common stock that is owned (or treated as owned) by an individual who is not a citizen or resident of the United States (as specially defined for United States federal estate tax purposes) at the time of death will be included in such holder’s gross estate for United States federal estate tax purposes, unless an applicable estate tax treaty provides otherwise, and, therefore, may be subject to United States federal estate tax.

Information Reporting and Backup Withholding

Distributions paid to a non-U.S. holder and the amount of tax withheld, if any, with respect to such distributions generally will be reported to the Internal Revenue Service. Copies of the information returns reporting such dividends and any withholding may also be made available to the tax authorities in the country in which the non-U.S. holder resides under the provisions of an applicable income tax treaty or exchange of information agreement.

A non-U.S. holder may be subject to backup withholding on dividends paid to such holder unless such holder certifies, on an applicable Internal Revenue Service Form W-8, under penalty of perjury that it is a non-U.S. holder (and the payor does not have actual knowledge or reason to know that such holder is a United States person as defined under the Code), or such holder otherwise establishes an exemption.

Information reporting and, depending on the circumstances, backup withholding generally will apply to the proceeds of a sale or other disposition of our common stock within the United States or conducted through certain United States-related financial intermediaries, unless the beneficial owner certifies, on an applicable Internal Revenue Service Form W-8, under penalty of perjury that it is a non-U.S. holder (and the payor does not have actual knowledge or reason to know that the beneficial owner is a United States person as defined under the Code), or such owner otherwise establishes an exemption.

Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules may be allowed as a refund or a credit against a non-U.S. holder’s United States federal income tax liability provided the required information is timely furnished to the Internal Revenue Service.

Additional Withholding Requirements

Under Sections 1471 through 1474 of the Code (such Sections commonly referred to as “FATCA”), a 30% United States federal withholding tax may apply to any dividends paid on our

 

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common stock, and, for a disposition of our common stock occurring after December 31, 2018, the gross proceeds from such disposition, in each case paid to (i) a “foreign financial institution” (as specifically defined in the Code) which does not provide sufficient documentation, typically on Internal Revenue Service Form W-8BEN-E, evidencing either (x) an exemption from FATCA, or (y) its compliance (or deemed compliance) with FATCA (which may alternatively be in the form of compliance with an intergovernmental agreement with the United States) in a manner that avoids withholding, or (ii) a “non-financial foreign entity” (as specifically defined in the Code) which does not provide sufficient documentation, typically on Internal Revenue Service Form W-8BEN-E, evidencing either (x) an exemption from FATCA, or (y) adequate information regarding certain substantial United States beneficial owners of such entity (if any). If a dividend payment is both subject to withholding under FATCA and subject to the withholding tax discussed above under “—Dividends,” the withholding under FATCA may be credited against, and therefore reduce, such other withholding tax. You should consult your own tax advisors regarding these requirements and whether they may be relevant to your ownership and disposition of our common stock.

 

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UNDERWRITING

We, the selling stockholders and the underwriters for the offering named below, for whom Goldman, Sachs & Co. is acting as representative, have entered into an underwriting agreement with respect to the shares of common stock. Subject to the terms and conditions of the underwriting agreement, the selling stockholders have agreed to sell to the underwriters, and each underwriter has severally agreed to purchase, the respective numbers of shares of common stock indicated in the following table at the public offering price, less the underwriting discounts payable by the selling stockholders, set forth on the cover page of this prospectus supplement.

 

Underwriter

   Number
of Shares
 

Goldman, Sachs & Co.

  

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith
Incorporated

  

KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

  

CRT Capital Group LLC

  

The Buckingham Research Group Incorporated

  
  

 

 

 

Total

     2,000,000   
  

 

 

 

The underwriting agreement provides that the underwriters are obligated to purchase all the shares of common stock in the offering if any are purchased, other than those shares covered by the underwriters’ option described below. The underwriting agreement also provides that if an underwriter defaults, the purchase commitments of non-defaulting underwriters may be increased or the offering may be terminated.

The selling stockholders have granted to the underwriters a 30-day option to purchase on a pro rata basis up to 300,000 additional shares at the public offering price less the underwriting discounts payable by the selling stockholders.

The underwriters propose to offer the shares of common stock initially at the public offering price on the cover page of this prospectus supplement and to selling group members at that price less a selling concession of $         per share. After the offering, Goldman, Sachs & Co., as representative to the underwriters, may change the public offering price and concession.

The underwriting fee for the Marketed Shares is $         per share. The underwriters will receive no underwriting discount or commission on the Repurchased Shares. We have agreed to pay 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares sold by the selling stockholders pursuant to this prospectus supplement. The selling stockholders will pay the remaining 50% of the underwriting discounts and commissions on the Marketed Shares. The following table summarizes the per share and total underwriting discounts and commissions to be paid to the underwriters assuming both no exercise and full exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares:

 

     Per Share      Total  
     Without
Option
     With
Option
     Without
Option
     With
Option
 

Per Marketed Shares to be paid by the Selling Stockholders

   $                       $                       $                       $                   

Per Marketed Shares to be paid by the Company

           

Per Repurchased Shares

                               
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $        $        $        $    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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We estimate that the total expenses of this offering, which are payable by us, including filing and listing fees, printing fees and legal and accounting expenses (including up to $50,000 of the fees of counsels to the selling stockholders we have agreed to reimburse), but excluding the underwriting discounts and commissions, will be approximately $642,000.

In connection with this offering, we and certain of our executive officers and directors agreed that, subject to certain exceptions, we will not (i) offer, sell, contract to sell, pledge, grant any option to purchase, make any short sale or otherwise transfer or dispose of, directly or indirectly, or file with the SEC a registration statement under the Securities Act relating to any securities of the Company that are substantially similar to the shares of common stock offered hereunder, including but not limited to any options or warrants to purchase shares of common stock or any securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common stock or any such substantially similar securities, or publicly disclose the intention to make any offer, sale, pledge, disposition or filing or (ii) enter into any swap or other agreement that transfers, in whole or in part, any of the economic consequences of ownership of common stock or any such other securities, whether any such transaction described in clause (i) or (ii) above is to be settled by delivery of common stock or such other securities, in cash or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Goldman, Sachs & Co. for a period of 90 days after the date of this prospectus supplement, other than (A) any options or other awards (including without limitation restricted stock or restricted stock units), or shares of common stock issued with respect to such options and other awards, granted under our incentive plans (including, for clarity, the 2011 Omnibus Incentive Plan) or otherwise in equity compensation arrangements with our directors, officers, employees and consultants, in each case as in existence on the date of the underwriting agreement, (B) the issuance of securities registered pursuant to any registration statement on Form S-8 relating to any benefit plans or arrangements disclosed in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus or the registration statement of which this prospectus supplement forms a part, (C) the issuance of common stock in connection with the acquisition or license of the securities, business, property technology or other asset of another entity, or a business combination, a joint venture, commercial relationship or other strategic transactions with another entity, and the filing of a registration statement with respect thereto, provided that the aggregate number of shares issued or issuable pursuant to this clause (C) does not exceed 10% of the number of shares of common stock outstanding immediately after this offering and prior to such issuance each recipient of any such securities shall execute and deliver a lock-up agreement, (D) any shares of common stock issued upon the exercise of options or other awards (including without limitation restricted stock or restricted stock units) granted under the incentive plans or otherwise in equity compensation arrangements described in clause (A) above, and (E) shares of common stock to be issued upon the exercise of a warrant or the conversion or exchange of convertible or exchangeable securities outstanding as of the date of the underwriting agreement.

The selling stockholders have agreed in connection with this offering that they will not offer, sell, issue, contract to sell, pledge, grant any option to purchase, make any short sale or otherwise dispose of, except as provided hereunder, any securities of the Company that are substantially similar to the shares of common stock offered hereunder, including but not limited to any securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common stock or any such substantially similar securities, whether any such transaction described above is to be settled by delivery of common stock or such other securities, in cash or otherwise (other than pursuant to employee stock option plans existing on, or upon the conversion or exchange of convertible or exchangeable securities outstanding as of, the date of the underwriting agreement), without, in each case, the prior written consent of Goldman, Sachs & Co. for a period of 90 days after the date of this prospectus supplement. These lock-up restrictions are subject to certain specific exceptions, including transfers of common stock as a bona fide gift, to a trust or to certain entities controlled by such holder, provided that the recipient of the shares agrees to be bound by the same restrictions set forth therein and provided further that any such transfer shall not involve a disposition for value.

 

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Goldman, Sachs & Co., as representative to the underwriters, in its sole discretion, may release the common stock and other securities subject to the lock-up agreements described above in whole or in part at any time. When determining whether or not to release the common stock and other securities from lock-up agreements, Goldman, Sachs & Co. will consider, among other factors, the holder’s reasons for requesting the release and the number of shares of common stock or other securities for which the release is being requested.

We and the selling stockholders have agreed to indemnify the underwriters against liabilities under the Securities Act, and to reimburse any payments or expenses that the underwriters may be required to make or incur in that respect.

Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “CPS”.

The underwriters and their affiliates are full-service financial institutions engaged in various activities, which may include securities trading, commercial and investment banking, financial advisory, investment management, investment research, principal investment hedging, financing and brokerage activities. The underwriters and their affiliates have from time to time performed, and may in the future perform, various financial advisory, commercial banking and investment banking services for us and for our affiliates, as well as for the selling stockholders and their affiliates, in the ordinary course of business for which they have received and would receive customary compensation.

Under our Senior ABL Facility, affiliates of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated act as administrative agent, swing-line lender, co-letter of credit lender and as a lender thereunder. Additionally, Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated acted as joint lead arranger, joint bookrunner and syndication agent for our Term Loan Facility.

In the ordinary course of their various business activities, the underwriters and their affiliates may make or hold a broad array of investments and actively trade debt and equity securities (or related derivative securities) and financial instruments (including bank loans) for their own account and for the accounts of their customers, and such investments and securities activities may involve securities and/or instruments of the Company. The underwriters and their affiliates may also make investment recommendations and/or publish or express independent research views in respect of such securities or instruments and may at any time hold, or recommend to clients that they acquire, long and/or short positions in such securities and instruments.

In connection with this offering, the underwriters may engage in stabilizing transactions, which involves making bids for, purchasing and selling shares of common stock in the open market for the purpose of preventing or retarding a decline in the market price of the common stock while this offering is in progress. These stabilizing transactions may include making short sales of the common stock, which involves the sale by the underwriters of a greater number of shares of common stock than they are required to purchase in this offering, and purchasing shares of common stock on the open market to cover positions created by short sales. The underwriters may close out any covered short position by purchasing shares in the open market. A short position is more likely to be created if the underwriters are concerned that there may be downward pressure on the price of the common stock in the open market that could adversely affect investors who purchase in this offering. To the extent that the underwriters create a short position, they will purchase shares in the open market to cover the position.

The underwriters have advised us that, pursuant to Regulation M of the Securities Act, they may also engage in other activities that stabilize, maintain or otherwise affect the price of the common stock, including the imposition of penalty bids.

These activities may have the effect of raising or maintaining the market price of the common stock or preventing or retarding a decline in the market price of the common stock, and, as a result, the

 

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price of the common stock may be higher than the price that otherwise might exist in the open market. If the underwriters commence these activities, they may discontinue them at any time. The underwriters may carry out these transactions on the New York Stock Exchange, in the over-the-counter market or otherwise.

A prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus in electronic format may be made available on web sites maintained by the underwriters participating in this offering and the underwriters participating in this offering may distribute prospectuses electronically. The underwriters may agree to allocate a number of shares to selling group members for sale to their online brokerage account holders. Internet distributions will be allocated by the underwriters that will make internet distributions on the same basis as other allocations.

Selling Restrictions

Notice to Prospective Investors in the European Economic Area

In relation to each Member State of the European Economic Area which has implemented the Prospectus Directive (each, a “Relevant Member State”), each underwriter has represented and agreed that with effect from and including the date on which the Prospectus Directive is implemented in that Relevant Member State (the ‘‘Relevant Implementation Date’’) it has not made and will not make an offer of shares which are the subject of the offering contemplated by this prospectus supplement to the public in that Relevant Member State other than:

(a) to legal entities which are qualified investors as defined under the Prospectus Directive;

(b) to fewer than 100, or, if the Relevant Member State has implemented the relevant provisions of the 2010 PD Amending Directive, 150, natural or legal persons (other than qualified investors as defined in the Prospectus Directive), as permitted under the Prospectus Directive; or

(c) in any other circumstances falling within Article 3(2) of the Prospectus Directive,

provided that no such offer of shares shall result in a requirement for the Company or any underwriter to publish a prospectus pursuant to Article 3 of the Prospectus Directive or supplement a prospectus pursuant to Article 16 of the Prospectus Directive.

Each person in a Relevant Member State who initially acquires any shares or to whom any offer is made will be deemed to have represented, acknowledged and agreed that (A) it is a “qualified investor” within the meaning of the law in that Relevant Member State implementing Article 2(1)(e) of the Prospectus Directive, and (B) in the case of any shares acquired by it as a financial intermediary, as that term is used in Article 3(2) of the Prospectus Directive, the shares acquired by it in the offering have not been acquired on behalf of, nor have they been acquired with a view to their offer or resale to, persons in any Relevant Member State other than “qualified investors” as defined in the Prospectus Directive, or in circumstances in which the prior consent of the representatives has been given to the offer or resale. In the case of any shares being offered to a financial intermediary as that term is used in Article 3(2) of the Prospectus Directive, each such financial intermediary will be deemed to have represented, acknowledged and agreed that the shares acquired by it in the offer have not been acquired on a non-discretionary basis on behalf of, nor have they been acquired with a view to their offer or resale to, persons in circumstances which may give rise to an offer of any shares to the public other than their offer or resale in a Relevant Member State to qualified investors as so defined or in circumstances in which the prior consent of the representatives has been obtained to each such proposed offer or resale.

The Company, the representatives and their affiliates will rely upon the truth and accuracy of the foregoing representation, acknowledgement and agreement.

 

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This prospectus supplement has been prepared on the basis that any offer of shares in any Relevant Member State will be made pursuant to an exemption under the Prospectus Directive from the requirement to publish a prospectus for offers of shares. Accordingly any person making or intending to make an offer in that Relevant Member State of shares which are the subject of the offering contemplated in this prospectus supplement may only do so in circumstances in which no obligation arises for the Company or any of the underwriters to publish a prospectus pursuant to Article 3 of the Prospectus Directive in relation to such offer. Neither the Company nor the underwriters have authorized, nor do they authorize, the making of any offer of shares in circumstances in which an obligation arises for the Company or the underwriters to publish a prospectus for such offer.

For the purposes of this provision, the expression an “offer to the public” in relation to any shares in any Relevant Member State means the communication in any form and by any means of sufficient information on the terms of the offer and any Shares to be offered so as to enable an investor to decide to purchase any Shares, as the same may be varied in that Member State by any measure implementing the Prospectus Directive in that Member State, the expression “Prospectus Directive” means Directive 2003/71/EC (and amendments thereto, including the 2010 PD Amending Directive, to the extent implemented in the Relevant Member State), and includes any relevant implementing measure in each Relevant Member State and the expression “2010 PD Amending Directive” means Directive 2010/73/EU.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Canada

The shares may be sold only to purchasers purchasing, or deemed to be purchasing, as principal that are accredited investors, as defined in National Instrument 45-106 Prospectus Exemptions or subsection 73.3(1) of the Securities Act (Ontario), and are permitted clients, as defined in National Instrument 31-103 Registration Requirements, Exemptions and Ongoing Registrant Obligations. Any resale of the shares must be made in accordance with an exemption from, or in a transaction not subject to, the prospectus requirements of applicable securities laws.

Securities legislation in certain provinces or territories of Canada may provide a purchaser with remedies for rescission or damages if this prospectus supplement (including any amendment thereto) contains a misrepresentation, provided that the remedies for rescission or damages are exercised by the purchaser within the time limit prescribed by the securities legislation of the purchaser’s province or territory. The purchaser should refer to any applicable provisions of the securities legislation of the purchaser’s province or territory for particulars of these rights or consult with a legal advisor.

Pursuant to section 3A.3 of National Instrument 33-105 Underwriting Conflicts (NI 33-105), the underwriters are not required to comply with the disclosure requirements of NI 33-105 regarding underwriter conflicts of interest in connection with this offering.

Notice to Prospective Investors in the United Kingdom

In addition, in the United Kingdom, this document is being distributed only to, and is directed only at, and any offer subsequently made may only be directed at persons who are “qualified investors” (as defined in the Prospectus Directive) (i) who have professional experience in matters relating to investments falling within Article 19(5) of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (Financial Promotion) Order 2005, as amended (the “Order”) and/or (ii) who are high net worth companies (or persons to whom it may otherwise be lawfully communicated) falling within Article 49(2)(a) to (d) of the Order (all such persons together being referred to as “relevant persons”). This document must not be acted on or relied on in the United Kingdom by persons who are not relevant persons. In the United Kingdom, any investment or investment activity to which this document relates is only available to, and will be engaged in with, relevant persons.

 

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Notice to Prospective Investors in Hong Kong

The shares may not be offered or sold by means of any document other than (i) in circumstances which do not constitute an offer to the public within the meaning of the Companies Ordinance (Cap. 32, Laws of Hong Kong), or (ii) to “professional investors” within the meaning of the Securities and Futures Ordinance (Cap. 571, Laws of Hong Kong) and any rules made thereunder, or (iii) in other circumstances which do not result in the document being a “prospectus” within the meaning of the Companies Ordinance (Cap. 32, Laws of Hong Kong), and no advertisement, invitation or document relating to the shares may be issued or may be in the possession of any person for the purpose of issue (in each case whether in Hong Kong or elsewhere), which is directed at, or the contents of which are likely to be accessed or read by, the public in Hong Kong (except if permitted to do so under the laws of Hong Kong) other than with respect to shares which are or are intended to be disposed of only to persons outside Hong Kong or only to “professional investors” within the meaning of the Securities and Futures Ordinance (Cap. 571, Laws of Hong Kong) and any rules made thereunder.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Singapore

This prospectus has not been registered as a prospectus with the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Accordingly, this prospectus and any other document or material in connection with the offer or sale, or invitation for subscription or purchase, of the shares may not be circulated or distributed, nor may the shares be offered or sold, or be made the subject of an invitation for subscription or purchase, whether directly or indirectly, to persons in Singapore other than (i) to an institutional investor under Section 274 of the Securities and Futures Act, Chapter 289 of Singapore, or the SFA, (ii) to a relevant person, or any person pursuant to Section 275(1A), and in accordance with the conditions, specified in Section 275 of the SFA or (iii) otherwise pursuant to, and in accordance with the conditions of, any other applicable provision of the SFA.

Where the shares are subscribed or purchased under Section 275 by a relevant person which is: (a) a corporation (which is not an accredited investor) the sole business of which is to hold investments and the entire share capital of which is owned by one or more individuals, each of whom is an accredited investor; or (b) a trust (where the trustee is not an accredited investor) whose sole purpose is to hold investments and each beneficiary is an accredited investor, shares, debentures and units of shares and debentures of that corporation or the beneficiaries’ rights and interest in that trust shall not be transferable for 6 months after that corporation or that trust has acquired the shares under Section 275 except: (i) to an institutional investor under Section 274 of the SFA or to a relevant person, or any person pursuant to Section 275(1A), and in accordance with the conditions, specified in Section 275 of the SFA; (ii) where no consideration is given for the transfer; or (iii) by operation of law.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Japan

The securities have not been and will not be registered under the Financial Instruments and Exchange Law of Japan (Law No. 25 of 1948, as amended) and, accordingly, will not be offered or sold, directly or indirectly, in Japan, or for the benefit of any Japanese Person or to others for re-offering or resale, directly or indirectly, in Japan or to any Japanese Person, except in compliance with all applicable laws, regulations and ministerial guidelines promulgated by relevant Japanese governmental or regulatory authorities in effect at the relevant time. For the purposes of this paragraph, “Japanese Person” shall mean any person resident in Japan, including any corporation or other entity organized under the laws of Japan.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Australia

No placement document, prospectus, product disclosure statement or other disclosure document has been lodged with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (“ASIC”), in relation to the offering. This prospectus does not constitute a prospectus, product disclosure statement or other

 

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disclosure document under the Corporations Act 2001 (the “Corporations Act”), and does not purport to include the information required for a prospectus, product disclosure statement or other disclosure document under the Corporations Act.

Any offer in Australia of the shares may only be made to persons (the “Exempt Investors”) who are “sophisticated investors” (within the meaning of section 708(8) of the Corporations Act), “professional investors” (within the meaning of section 708(11) of the Corporations Act) or otherwise pursuant to one or more exemptions contained in section 708 of the Corporations Act so that it is lawful to offer the shares without disclosure to investors under Chapter 6D of the Corporations Act.

The shares applied for by Exempt Investors in Australia must not be offered for sale in Australia in the period of 12 months after the date of allotment under the offering, except in circumstances where disclosure to investors under Chapter 6D of the Corporations Act would not be required pursuant to an exemption under section 708 of the Corporations Act or otherwise or where the offer is pursuant to a disclosure document which complies with Chapter 6D of the Corporations Act. Any person acquiring shares must observe such Australian on-sale restrictions.

This prospectus contains general information only and does not take account of the investment objectives, financial situation or particular needs of any particular person. It does not contain any securities recommendations or financial product advice. Before making an investment decision, investors need to consider whether the information in this prospectus is appropriate to their needs, objectives and circumstances, and, if necessary, seek expert advice on those matters.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Switzerland

The shares may not be publicly offered in Switzerland and will not be listed on the SIX Swiss Exchange (“SIX”) or on any other stock exchange or regulated trading facility in Switzerland. This document has been prepared without regard to the disclosure standards for issuance prospectuses under art. 652a or art. 1156 of the Swiss Code of Obligations or the disclosure standards for listing prospectuses under art. 27 ff. of the SIX Listing Rules or the listing rules of any other stock exchange or regulated trading facility in Switzerland. Neither this document nor any other offering or marketing material relating to the shares or the offering may be publicly distributed or otherwise made publicly available in Switzerland.

Neither this document nor any other offering or marketing material relating to the offering, the Company, the shares have been or will be filed with or approved by any Swiss regulatory authority. In particular, this document will not be filed with, and the offer of shares will not be supervised by, the Swiss Financial Market Supervisory Authority FINMA (FINMA), and the offer of shares has not been and will not be authorized under the Swiss Federal Act on Collective Investment Schemes (“CISA”). The investor protection afforded to acquirers of interests in collective investment schemes under the CISA does not extend to acquirers of shares.

Notice to Prospective Investors in the Dubai International Financial Centre

This prospectus supplement relates to an Exempt Offer in accordance with the Offered Securities Rules of the Dubai Financial Services Authority (“DFSA”). This prospectus supplement is intended for distribution only to persons of a type specified in the Offered Securities Rules of the DFSA. It must not be delivered to, or relied on by, any other person. The DFSA has no responsibility for reviewing or verifying any documents in connection with Exempt Offers. The DFSA has not approved this prospectus supplement nor taken steps to verify the information set forth herein and has no responsibility for the prospectus supplement. The shares to which this prospectus supplement relates may be illiquid and/or subject to restrictions on their resale. Prospective purchasers of the shares offered should conduct their own due diligence on the shares. If you do not understand the contents of this prospectus supplement you should consult an authorized financial advisor.

 

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LEGAL MATTERS

The validity of the shares of common stock offered by this prospectus supplement will be passed upon for us by Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP, New York, New York. The underwriters have been represented in this offering by Cravath, Swaine  & Moore LLP, New York, New York.

EXPERTS

The consolidated financial statements of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. appearing in this Prospectus Supplement and Registration Statement and in Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.’s Annual Report (Form 10-K) for the year ended December 31, 2015 including the schedule appearing therein and elsewhere herein, and the effectiveness of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, have been audited by Ernst & Young LLP, independent registered public accounting firm, as set forth in their reports thereon included therein and appearing elsewhere herein, and incorporated herein by reference. Such financial statements are, and audited financial statements to be included in subsequently filed documents will be, incorporated herein in reliance upon the reports of Ernst & Young LLP pertaining to such financial statements and the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the respective dates (to the extent covered by consents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission) given on the authority of such firm as experts in accounting and auditing.

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

We have filed a registration statement on Form S-3 with respect to the common stock offered by this prospectus supplement with the SEC. This prospectus supplement is a part of the registration statement and does not contain all of the information set forth in the registration statement and its exhibits and schedules, portions of which have been omitted as permitted by the rules and regulations of the SEC. For further information about us and our common stock, you should refer to the registration statement and its exhibits and schedules.

We are subject to the informational reporting requirements of the Exchange Act and, in accordance with the Exchange Act, we file annual, quarterly and special reports and other information with the SEC. Our filings with the SEC are available to the public on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. Those filings are also available to the public on, or accessible through, our website under the heading “Investors.” The information we file with the SEC or contained on or accessible through our corporate website or any other website that we may maintain is not part of this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus or the registration statement of which this prospectus supplement is a part. You may also read and copy, at SEC prescribed rates, any document we file with the SEC, including the registration statement (and its exhibits) of which this prospectus supplement is a part, at the SEC’s Public Reference Room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington D.C. 20549. You can call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 to obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room.

INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE

The SEC’s rules allow us to “incorporate by reference” information into this prospectus supplement. This means that we can disclose important information to you by referring you to another document. Any information referred to in this way is considered part of this prospectus supplement from the date we file that document. Any reports filed by us pursuant to Sections 13(a), 13(c), 14 and 15 of the Exchange Act with the SEC after the date of this prospectus supplement and prior to the termination of this offering shall be deemed to be incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and to be a part hereof from the date of filing of such documents and, where applicable, supersede any information contained in this prospectus supplement or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement.

 

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We incorporate by reference into this prospectus supplement the following documents or information filed with the SEC:

 

    Our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, filed on February 23, 2016 (File No. 001-36127);

 

    The portion of our proxy statement on Schedule 14A filed on April 10, 2015 which was specifically incorporated by reference into our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014, filed on February 24, 2015 (File No. 001-36127); and

 

    The description of our common stock contained in Form 8-A filed on March 21, 2011, and any amendment or report filed under the Exchange Act for the purpose of updating such description (File No. 000-54305).

Notwithstanding the foregoing, we are not incorporating by reference information furnished under Items 2.02 and 7.01 of any Current Report on Form 8-K (including any Form 8-K itemized above), including the related exhibits, nor in any documents or other information that is deemed to have been “furnished” to and not “filed” with the SEC. We will provide without charge to each person, including any beneficial owner, to whom this prospectus supplement is delivered, upon his or her written or oral request, a copy of any or all documents referred to above which have been or may be incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement, excluding exhibits to those documents unless they are specifically incorporated by reference into those documents.

You can request those documents from by writing or calling us at the following address and telephone number:

Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

39550 Orchard Hill Place Drive

Novi, Michigan 48375

(248) 596-5900

 

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INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Audited Financial Statements

 

Report of Ernst & Young LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

     F-2   

Report of Ernst & Young LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm, Internal Control over Financial Reporting

     F-3   

Consolidated Statements of Net Income For The Years Ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

     F-5   

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) For The Years Ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

     F-6   

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2015 and 2014

     F-7   

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity For The Years Ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

     F-8   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows For The Years Ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

     F-9   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     F-10   

Schedule II—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts

     F-50   

 

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the related consolidated statements of net income, comprehensive income (loss), changes in equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2015. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index as Schedule II. These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. at December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2015, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) and our report dated February 23, 2016 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Detroit, Michigan

February 23, 2016

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

We have audited Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) (the COSO criteria). Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

As indicated in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting, management’s assessment of and conclusion on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting did not include the internal controls of Huayu-Cooper Standard Sealing Systems Co. (“Shenya”), which is included in the 2015 consolidated financial statements of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. and constituted 9% of total assets as of December 31, 2015 and 5% of revenues and net income, for the year then ended. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. also did not include an evaluation of the internal control over financial reporting of Shenya.

In our opinion, Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, based on the COSO criteria. We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. as of

 

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December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the related consolidated statements of net income, comprehensive income, changes in equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2015, and our report dated February 23, 2016 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Detroit, Michigan

February 23, 2016

 

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COOPER-STANDARD HOLDINGS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF NET INCOME

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share amounts)

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015     2014     2013  

Sales

   $ 3,342,804      $ 3,243,987      $ 3,090,542   

Cost of products sold

     2,755,691        2,734,558        2,617,804   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     587,113        509,429        472,738   

Selling, administration & engineering expenses

     329,922        301,724        293,446   

Amortization of intangibles

     13,892        16,437        15,431   

Impairment charges

     21,611        26,273          

Restructuring charges

     53,844        17,414        21,720   

Other operating profit

     (8,033     (16,927       
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating profit

     175,877        164,508        142,141   

Interest expense, net of interest income

     (38,331     (45,604     (54,921

Equity earnings

     5,683        6,037        11,070   

Other income (expense), net

     9,759        (36,658     (7,437
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     152,988        88,283        90,853   

Income tax expense

     41,218        42,810        45,599   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     111,770        45,473        45,254   

Net loss (income) attributable to noncontrolling interests

     110        (2,694     2,687   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

   $ 111,880      $ 42,779      $ 47,941   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income available to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. common stockholders

   $ 111,880      $ 42,779      $ 35,054   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings per share

      

Basic

   $ 6.50      $ 2.56      $ 2.39   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 6.08      $ 2.39      $ 2.24   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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COOPER-STANDARD HOLDINGS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(Dollar amounts in thousands)

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015     2014     2013  

Net income

   $ 111,770      $ 45,473      $ 45,254   

Other comprehensive income (loss):

      

Currency translation adjustment

     (80,331     (56,162     (12,550

Benefit plan liabilities, net of tax(1)

     2,737        (53,455     30,612   

Fair value change of derivatives, net of tax(2)

     (269     (2,011     (250
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other comprehensive (loss) income, net of tax

     (77,863     (111,628     17,812   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss)

     33,907        (66,155     63,066   

Comprehensive loss (income) attributable to noncontrolling interests

     451        (2,615     2,629   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.

   $ 34,358      $ (68,770   $ 65,695   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1) Other comprehensive income (loss) related to the benefit plan liabilities is net of a tax effect of $2,051, $19,096 and $(17,224) for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.
(2) Other comprehensive income (loss) related to the fair value change of derivatives is net of a tax effect of $299, $1,253 and $99 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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COOPER-STANDARD HOLDINGS INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Dollar amounts in thousands except share amounts)

 

     December 31,  
     2015     2014  

Assets

    

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 378,243      $ 267,270   

Accounts receivable, net

     455,187        377,032   

Tooling receivable

     102,877        124,015   

Inventories

     149,645        166,531   

Prepaid expenses

     30,016        25,626   

Other

     73,513        93,524   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     1,189,481        1,053,998   

Property, plant and equipment, net

     765,369        716,013   

Goodwill

     149,219        135,169   

Intangibles, net

     70,702        82,309   

Deferred tax assets

     49,299        41,059   

Other assets

     80,222        97,082   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 2,304,292      $ 2,125,630   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and Equity

    

Current liabilities:

    

Debt payable within one year

   $ 45,494      $ 35,631   

Accounts payable

     400,604        322,422   

Payroll liabilities

     127,609        94,986   

Accrued liabilities

     107,713        75,005   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     681,420        528,044   

Long-term debt

     732,418        743,106   

Pension benefits

     176,525        191,805   

Postretirement benefits other than pensions

     52,963        60,287   

Deferred tax liabilities

     4,914        5,001   

Other liabilities

     41,253        44,692   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     1,689,493        1,572,935   

Redeemable noncontrolling interest

            3,981   

7% Cumulative participating convertible preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized; no shares outstanding

              

Equity:

    

Common stock, $0.001 par value, 190,000,000 shares authorized; 19,105,251 shares issued and 17,458,945 outstanding at December 31, 2015 and 18,685,634 shares issued and 17,039,328 outstanding at December 31, 2014

     17        17   

Additional paid-in capital

     513,764        492,959   

Retained earnings

     306,713        195,233   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (217,065     (139,243
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. equity

     603,429        548,966   

Noncontrolling interests

     11,370        (252
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total equity

     614,799        548,714   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 2,304,292      $ 2,125,630   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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COOPER-STANDARD HOLDINGS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

(Dollar amounts in thousands except share amounts)

 

          Total Equity  
    Redeemable
Noncontrolling
Interests
    Common
Shares
    Common
Stock
    Additional
Paid-In
Capital
    Retained
Earnings
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
    Cooper-
Standard
Holdings
Inc. Equity
    Noncontrolling
Interest
    Total
Equity
 

Balance at December 31, 2012

  $ 14,194        17,275,852      $ 16      $ 471,851      $ 201,907      $ (45,448   $ 628,326      $ 905      $ 629,231   

Shares issued under stock option plans

           32,176               (702                   (702            (702

Repurchase of common stock

           (5,044,109     (5     (122,067     (95,477            (217,549            (217,549

Converted preferred stock shares

           4,130,742        4        121,908                      121,912               121,912   

Warrant exercise

           419,124        1        11,252                      11,253               11,253   

Stock based compensation, net

           (137,246     1        7,695        (2,011            5,685               5,685   

Preferred stock dividends

                                (4,454            (4,454            (4,454

Remeasurement of redeemable noncontrolling interest

    (8,249                          8,869               8,869        (620     8,249   

Purchase of noncontrolling interest

                         (885                   (885     (1,026     (1,911

Net income (loss) for 2013

    (126                          47,941               47,941        (2,561     45,380   

Other comprehensive income (loss)

    (666                                 17,754        17,754        724        18,478   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2013

    5,153        16,676,539        17        489,052        156,775        (27,694     618,150        (2,578     615,572   

Shares issued under stock option plans

           42,014               (1,307                   (1,307            (1,307

Repurchase of common stock

           (96,622            (2,338     (2,824            (5,162            (5,162

Warrant exercise

           425,886               9,022                      9,022               9,022   

Stock based compensation, net

           (8,489            11,458        (1,497            9,961               9,961   

Excess tax benefit on stock options

                         4,098                      4,098               4,098   

Purchase of noncontrolling interest

                         (17,026                   (17,026     (1,461     (18,487

Net income (loss) for 2014

    (1,110                          42,779               42,779        3,804        46,583   

Other comprehensive loss

    (62                                 (111,549     (111,549     (17     (111,566
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2014

    3,981        17,039,328        17        492,959        195,233        (139,243     548,966        (252     548,714   

Shares issued under stock option plans

           20,960               (289                   (289            (289

Warrant exercise

      344,159               9,277                      9,277               9,277   

Stock based compensation, net

           54,498               8,635        (400            8,235               8,235   

Excess tax benefit on stock options

                         320                      320               320   

Acquisition

                                                     11,836        11,836   

Purchase of noncontrolling interest

    (3,936                   2,862               (300     2,562        192        2,754   

Net income (loss) for 2015

    (45                          111,880               111,880        (65     111,815   

Other comprehensive loss

                                       (77,522     (77,522     (341     (77,863
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2015

  $        17,458,945      $ 17      $ 513,764      $ 306,713      $ (217,065   $ 603,429      $ 11,370      $ 614,799   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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COOPER-STANDARD HOLDINGS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Dollar amounts in thousands)

 

    Year Ended December 31,  
    2015     2014     2013  

Operating Activities:

     

Net income

  $ 111,770      $ 45,473      $ 45,254   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

     

Depreciation

    100,535        96,143        95,597   

Amortization of intangibles

    13,892        16,437        15,431   

Impairment charges

    21,611        26,273          

Stock-based compensation expense

    13,955        12,587        11,576   

Equity earnings, net of dividends related to earnings

    (3,766     (3,767     (5,723

Loss on extinguishment of debt

           30,488          

Gain on divestitures and sale of investment in affiliate

    (8,033     (18,809       

Gain on remeasurement of previously held equity interest

    (14,199              

Deferred income taxes

    (2,698     8,816        27,479   

Other

    725        542        2,902   

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

     

Accounts and tooling receivable

    (72,546     (17,934     (49,786

Inventories

    12,848        888        (31,823

Prepaid expenses

    5,348        277        (5,981

Accounts payable

    61,063        (11,460     58,369   

Accrued liabilities

    75,424        (3,674     (7,939

Other

    (45,544     (11,231     (22,099
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

    270,385        171,049        133,257   

Investing activities:

     

Capital expenditures, including other intangible assets

    (166,267     (192,089     (183,336

Proceeds from divestitures and sale of investment in affiliate

    33,500        50,602          

Acquisition of businesses, net of cash acquired

    (34,396     (21,217     (13,504

Investment in joint ventures

    (4,300              

Return on equity investments

           951        2,120   

Proceeds from sale of fixed assets and other

    5,069        4,357        3,636   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

    (166,394     (157,396     (191,084

Financing activities:

     

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt, net of debt issuance costs

           737,462          

Repurchase of Senior Notes and Senior PIK Toggle Notes

           (675,615       

Proceeds from issuance of Senior PIK Toggle Notes, net of debt issuance costs

                  194,357   

Purchase of noncontrolling interest

    (1,262     (18,487     (1,911

Repurchase of common stock

           (5,162     (217,549

Proceeds from exercise of warrants

    9,277        9,022        11,253   

Increase (decrease) in short term debt, net

    (9,008     334        (486

Borrowings on long-term debt

    151        6,609        7,073   

Principal payments on long-term debt

    (8,863     (4,273     (3,930

Preferred stock cash dividends paid

                  (4,747

Taxes withheld and paid on employees’ share based payment awards

    (2,028     (4,214     (5,985

Excess tax benefits on stock options

    320        4,098          

Other

    (177     (363     (1,122
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

    (11,590     49,411        (23,047

Effects of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

    18,572        19,836        (5,311
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Changes in cash and cash equivalents

    110,973        82,900        (86,185

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

    267,270        184,370        270,555   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

  $ 378,243      $ 267,270      $ 184,370   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-9


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

1. Description of Business

Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc. (together with its consolidated subsidiaries, the “Company” or “Cooper Standard”), through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Cooper-Standard Automotive Inc. (“CSA U.S.”), is a leading manufacturer of sealing, fuel and brake delivery, fluid transfer, and anti-vibration systems. The Company’s products are primarily for use in passenger vehicles and light trucks that are manufactured by global automotive original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) and replacement markets. The Company conducts substantially all of its activities through its subsidiaries.

The Company believes that it is the largest global producer of sealing systems, the second largest global producer of the types of fuel and brake delivery products that they manufacture, the third largest global producer of fluid transfer systems, and one of the largest North American producers of anti-vibration systems. The Company designs and manufactures its products in each major region of the world through a disciplined and sustained approach to engineering and operational excellence. The Company operates in 79 manufacturing locations and 19 design, engineering, administrative and logistics locations in 20 countries around the world.

2. Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The consolidated financial statement are prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles (“U.S. GAAP”).

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Principles of Consolidation—The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and the wholly-owned and less than wholly-owned subsidiaries controlled by the Company. All material intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Acquired businesses are included in the consolidated financial statements from the dates of acquisition.

The equity method of accounting is followed for investments in which the Company does not have control, but does have the ability to exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies. Generally this occurs when ownership is between 20% to 50%. The cost method is followed in those situations where the Company does not have the ability to exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies, generally when ownership is less than 20%.

Foreign Currency—The financial statements of foreign subsidiaries are translated to U.S. dollars at the end-of-period exchange rates for assets and liabilities and at a weighted average exchange rate for each period for revenues and expenses. Translation adjustments for those subsidiaries whose local currency is their functional currency are recorded as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in stockholders’ equity. Transaction related gains and losses arising from fluctuations in currency exchange rates on transactions denominated in currencies other than the functional currency are recognized in earnings as incurred, except for those intercompany balances which are designated as long-term.

Cash and Cash Equivalents—The Company considers highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

Accounts Receivable—The Company records trade accounts receivable when revenue is recorded in accordance with its revenue recognition policy and relieves accounts receivable when

 

F-10


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

payments are received from customers. Accounts receivable are written off when it is apparent such amounts are not collectible. Generally, the Company does not require collateral for its accounts receivable, nor is interest charged on accounts receivable balances.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts—An allowance for doubtful accounts is established through charges to the provision for bad debts when it is probable that the outstanding receivable will not be collected. The Company evaluates the adequacy of the allowance for doubtful accounts on a periodic basis, including historical trends in collections and write-offs, management’s judgment of the probability of collecting accounts and management’s evaluation of business risk. This evaluation is inherently subjective, as it requires estimates that are susceptible to revision as more information becomes available. The allowance for doubtful accounts was $4,087 and $4,331 at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

Advertising Expense—Expenses incurred for advertising are generally expensed when incurred. Advertising expense was $3,418, $3,846 and $3,059 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Inventories—Inventories are valued at lower of cost or market. Cost is determined using the first-in, first-out method. Finished goods and work-in-process inventories include material, labor and manufacturing overhead costs. The Company records inventory reserves for inventory in excess of production and/or forecasted requirements and for obsolete inventory.

 

     December 31,  
     2015      2014  

Finished goods

   $ 43,031       $ 45,485   

Work in process

     32,863         36,498   

Raw materials and supplies

     73,751         84,548   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 149,645       $ 166,531   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Derivative Financial Instruments—Derivative financial instruments are utilized by the Company to reduce foreign currency exchange and interest rate risks. The Company has established policies and procedures for risk assessment and the approval, reporting and monitoring of derivative financial instrument activities. On the date the derivative is established, the Company designates the derivative as either a fair value hedge, a cash flow hedge or a net investment hedge in accordance with its established policy. The Company does not enter into derivative financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes.

Income Taxes—Deferred tax assets or liabilities are determined based on differences between financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using enacted tax laws and rates. A valuation allowance is provided on deferred tax assets if the Company determines that it is more likely than not that the asset will not be realized.

Long-Lived Assets—Property, plant and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated using primarily the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the expected life of the asset or term of the lease, whichever is shorter. Intangibles with finite lives, which include technology and customer relationships, are amortized over their estimated useful lives. The Company evaluates the recoverability of long-lived assets when events and circumstances indicate that the assets may be impaired and the undiscounted net cash flows

 

F-11


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

estimated to be generated by those assets are less than their carrying value. If the net carrying value exceeds the fair value, an impairment loss exists and is calculated based on a discounted cash flow analysis or estimated salvage value. Discounted cash flows are estimated using internal budgets and assumptions regarding discount rates and other factors.

Pre-Production Costs Related to Long Term Supply Arrangements—Costs for molds, dies and other tools owned by the Company to produce products under long-term supply arrangements are recorded at cost in property, plant and equipment and amortized over the lesser of three years or the term of the related supply agreement. The amounts capitalized were $5,104 and $2,955 as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The Company expenses all pre-production tooling costs related to customer-owned tools for which reimbursement is not contractually guaranteed by the customer. Reimbursable tooling costs are recorded in tooling receivable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets if considered a receivable in the next twelve months. Tooling receivable for customer-owned tooling as of December 31, 2015 and 2014 was $102,877 and $124,015, respectively, of which $71,943 and $92,787, respectively, was not yet invoiced to the customer. Reimbursable tooling costs included in other assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets were $12,969 and $12,500 as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

Goodwill—Goodwill is tested for impairment by reporting unit, either annually or when events or circumstances indicate that impairment may exist. The Company utilizes an income approach to estimate the fair value of each of its reporting units. The income approach is based on projected debt-free cash flow which is discounted to the present value using discount factors that consider the timing and risk of cash flows. The Company believes that this approach is appropriate because it provides a fair value estimate based upon the reporting unit’s expected long-term operating cash flow performance. Fair value is estimated using recent automotive industry and specific platform production volume projections, which are based on both third-party and internally-developed forecasts, as well as commercial, wage and benefit, inflation and discount rate assumptions. Other significant assumptions include the weighted average cost of capital, terminal value growth rate, terminal value margin rates, future capital expenditures and changes in future working capital requirements. While there are inherent uncertainties related to the assumptions used and to management’s application of these assumptions to this analysis, the Company believes that the income approach provides a reasonable estimate of the fair value of its reporting units. The guideline public company method, a form of the market approach, was used to corroborate the results of the Company’s income approach conclusions. The Company conducts its annual goodwill impairment analysis as of October 1st of each year.

The Company may first assess qualitative factors to determine if it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. The Company also has the option to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to the first step of the goodwill test. For 2015, the Company decided to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to the first step of the goodwill impairment test. The first step of the goodwill impairment test compares the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount, including goodwill. If the fair value exceeds the carrying value, then the Company concludes that no goodwill impairment has occurred. If the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, a second step is required to measure possible goodwill impairment loss. The second step includes hypothetically valuing the tangible and intangible assets and liabilities of the reporting unit as if the reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination. Then, the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill is compared to the carrying value of that goodwill. If the carrying value of the reporting unit’s goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of the goodwill, the Company would recognize an impairment loss in an amount equal to the excess, not to exceed the carrying value. The 2015, 2014 and 2013 annual goodwill impairment analyses resulted in no impairment.

 

F-12


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

Business Combinations—The purchase price of an acquired business is allocated to its identifiable assets and liabilities based on estimated fair values. The excess of the purchase price over the amount allocated to the assets and liabilities, if any, is recorded as goodwill. Determining the fair values of assets acquired and liabilities assumed requires management’s judgment, the utilization of independent appraisal firms and often involves the use of significant estimates and assumptions with respect to the timing and amount of future cash flows, market rate assumptions, actuarial assumptions, and appropriate discount rates, among other items.

Revenue Recognition and Sales Commitments—Revenue is recognized when there is persuasive evidence of a sales agreement, the delivery of the goods has occurred, the sales price is fixed and determinable and collectability is reasonably assured. The Company generally enters into agreements with its customers to produce products at the beginning of a vehicle’s life. Although such agreements do not generally provide for minimum quantities, once the Company enters into such agreements, fulfillment of its customers’ purchasing requirements can be the Company’s obligation for an extended period or the entire production life of the vehicle. These agreements generally may be terminated by the customer at any time. Historically, terminations of these agreements have been minimal. In certain limited instances, the Company may be committed under existing agreements to supply products to its customers at selling prices which are not sufficient to cover the direct cost to produce such products. In such situations, the Company recognize losses as they are incurred.

The Company receives blanket purchase orders from many of its customers on an annual basis. Generally, such purchase orders and related documents set forth the annual terms, including pricing, related to a particular vehicle model. Such purchase orders generally do not specify quantities. The Company recognizes revenue based on the pricing terms included in the annual purchase orders as products are shipped to the customers. As part of certain agreements, the Company is asked to provide its customers with annual cost reductions. The Company accrues for such amounts as a reduction of revenue as products are shipped to the customers. In addition, the Company generally has ongoing adjustments to pricing arrangements with its customers based on the related content and cost of the products. Such pricing adjustments are recorded when probable and estimable.

Shipping and Handling—Amounts billed to customers related to shipping and handling are included in sales in the Company’s consolidated statements of net income. Shipping and handling costs are included in cost of products sold in the Company’s consolidated statements of net income.

Research and Development—Costs are charged to selling, administration and engineering expenses as incurred and totaled $108,764, $101,982 and $103,475 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Stock-Based Compensation—The Company measures stock-based compensation expense at fair value and recognizes such expenses on a straight-line basis over the vesting period of the stock-based employee awards. See Note 18. “Stock-Based Compensation” for additional information.

Use of Estimates—The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period and assets and liabilities, as well as disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities, at the date of the financial statements. Considerable judgment is often involved in making such estimates, and the use of different assumptions could result in different conclusions. Management believes its assumptions and estimates are reasonable and appropriate. However, actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

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Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In January 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-01, Financial Instruments-Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Liabilities. The guidance revises existing U.S. GAAP by requiring equity investments (excluding those accounted for under the equity method or those that result in consolidation of the investee) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income, requiring entities to use the exit price notion when measuring the fair value of financial instruments for disclosure purposes, requiring separate presentation of financial assets and financial liabilities by measurement category and form of financial asset and requiring separate presentation in other comprehensive income of the portion of the total change in the fair value of a liability resulting from a change in the instrument-specific credit risk when the organization has elected to measure the liability at fair value. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption of certain provisions is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting this guidance on its consolidated financial statements.

In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes. This ASU requires companies to present deferred tax assets and liabilities as noncurrent on the balance sheet instead of separating deferred taxes into current and noncurrent amounts. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted. The Company adopted this guidance prospectively as of December 31, 2015, the impact of which is reflected in the consolidated balance sheet as of that date. As of December 31, 2014, the Company had $15,176 of deferred tax assets and $3,064 of deferred tax liabilities which remain classified as current in the consolidated balance sheet.

In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-16, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Simplifying the Accounting for Measurement-Period Adjustments. This ASU requires an acquirer to recognize adjustments to estimated amounts identified during the measurement period in the reporting period in which the adjustment is determined and not restate prior amounts disclosed. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this ASU is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-11, Inventory (Topic 330): Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory. This ASU requires entities to measure most inventory at the lower of cost and net realizable value. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting this guidance on its consolidated financial statements.

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-03, Interest: Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs, which requires the presentation of debt issuance costs in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the related debt liability rather than as a deferred charge. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-15, Interest: Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Presentation and Subsequent Measurement of Debt Issuance Costs Associated with Line-of-Credit Arrangements, which allows the presentation of debt issuance costs related to a line-of-credit arrangement as an asset, regardless of whether there are outstanding borrowings under the line-of-credit arrangement. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Retrospective adoption is required. As permitted, the Company elected to early adopt this guidance as of December 31, 2015 and has reclassified debt issuance costs

 

F-14


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

of $6,096 and $7,137 from other long-term assets to debt as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Debt issuance costs related to the Company’s revolving credit facility of $1,634 and $2,321 as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively, remain classified within other long-term assets.

In February 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-02, Consolidation (Topic 810): Amendments to the Consolidation Analysis. This ASU amends the consolidation guidance under U.S. GAAP. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015. The adoption of this ASU is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements: Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40): Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern. This ASU requires management to perform interim and annual assessments of an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. This guidance is effective for annual and interim reporting periods ending after December 15, 2016. The adoption of this ASU is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). The core principle of this guidance is that a company should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to a customer at an amount reflecting the consideration it expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, which delays the effective date of this guidance to annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption will be permitted as of the original effective date of annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016. The guidance allows for companies to use either a full retrospective or a modified retrospective approach when adopting. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting this guidance on its consolidated financial statements.

3. Acquisitions and Divestitures

Shenya Acquisition

In the first quarter of 2015, the Company completed the acquisition of an additional 47.5% of Huayu-Cooper Standard Sealing Systems Co. (“Shenya”), increasing its ownership to 95%, for cash consideration of $59,320, of which $41,474 was paid in 2015 and $17,846 was paid in 2014. The acquisition was accounted for as a business combination. The business acquired in the transaction is included in the Company’s Asia Pacific segment and is operated from Shenya’s manufacturing locations in China. Shenya primarily supplies sealing systems and components to the automotive industry. This acquisition is directly aligned with the Company’s growth strategy by strengthening important customer relationships in the automotive sealing systems market. The results of operations of Shenya are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements from the date of acquisition, February 27, 2015. The pro forma effect of this acquisition would not materially impact the Company’s reported results for any periods presented, and as a result no pro forma information has been presented.

Prior to the acquisition, the Company held a 47.5% unconsolidated equity interest in Shenya. The estimated fair value of the equity interest at the date of acquisition was $41,378, resulting in a gain of $14,199 recorded in other income (expense), net for the year ended December 31, 2015. The fair value of the Company’s previous 47.5% equity interest, 47.5% purchased and 5% noncontrolling

 

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Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

interest in Shenya were estimated using income and market approaches based on financial analysis methodologies (including the discounted cash flow analysis), projected financial information, management’s estimates, available information, and reasonable and supportable assumptions. These fair value measurements are classified within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy.

The following table summarizes the estimated fair value of Shenya assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the date of acquisition, updated as of December 31, 2015:

 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 7,079   

Accounts receivable

     24,197   

Inventories

     12,708   

Prepaid expenses

     11,624   

Other current assets

     23,396   

Property, plant, and equipment

     70,082   

Goodwill

     19,812   

Intangibles

     15,340   

Other assets

     14,834   
  

 

 

 

Total assets acquired

     199,072   
  

 

 

 

Debt payable within one year

     19,164   

Accounts payable

     45,159   

Other current liabilities

     15,877   

Other liabilities

     9,005   
  

 

 

 

Total liabilities assumed

     89,205   

Noncontrolling interest

     9,386   
  

 

 

 

Net assets acquired including noncontrolling interest

   $ 100,481   
  

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, other current assets, accounts payable and other current liabilities were stated at historical carrying values, which management believes approximates fair value given the short-term nature of these assets and liabilities. Inventories were recorded at fair value which is estimated for finished goods and work-in-process based upon the expected selling price less costs to complete, selling, and disposal costs, and a normal profit margin. Raw material inventory was recorded at historical carrying value as such value approximates the replacement cost. Deferred income taxes have been provided in the consolidated balance sheet based on the Company’s estimates of the tax versus book basis of the estimated fair value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed. The Company has estimated the fair value of property, plant and equipment, intangibles, certain other assets, certain liabilities and noncontrolling interest based upon third party valuations, management’s estimates, available information and reasonable and supportable assumptions. Goodwill represents the excess of the acquisition price over the fair value of the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

Other Acquisitions

In the first quarter of 2015, the Company acquired the remaining equity interests of Metzler Automotive Profiles India Private Limited (26%) and Cooper Standard Jingda Changchun Automotive Co., Ltd. (20%) for a combined cash consideration of $1,262. These acquisitions were accounted for as equity transactions.

 

F-16


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

In the third quarter of 2015, the Company contributed cash of $1,750 to establish a joint venture with Polyrub Extrusions (India) Private Limited. The joint venture, Polyrub Cooper Standard FTS Private Limited, is expected to increase market share and open new opportunities in the Company’s fluid transfer business. The Company owns 35% of the joint venture with the remaining 65% of the joint venture owned by Polyrub Extrusions (India) Private Limited. This investment is accounted for under the equity method and is included in other assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

Also in the third quarter of 2015, the Company contributed cash of $2,550 to establish a joint venture with Polyfoam Asia Pte. Ltd. The joint venture, Cooper-Standard INOAC Pte. Ltd., is expected to accelerate the Company’s fluid transfer systems strategy and provide better access to Japanese OEMs and add further support to global platforms. The Company owns 51% of the joint venture with the remaining 49% of the joint venture owned by Polyfoam Asia Pte. Ltd. The operating results of this joint venture are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements from the date of formation.

In the fourth quarter of 2014, the Company acquired the remaining 49% equity interests of Fonds de Modernisation des Equipementiers Automobiles interest in Cooper Standard France, a body sealing, anti-vibration systems and low pressure hoses joint venture for cash consideration of $18,487. This acquisition was accounted for as an equity transaction.

In the fourth quarter of 2014, the Company acquired Cikautxo Borja, S.L.U, a manufacturer of heating and cooling hoses, for cash consideration of $3,371.

Divestitures

In the fourth quarter of 2015, the Company completed the sale of its hard coat plastic exterior trim business, a non-core operation, to allow the Company to focus resources on its core product groups. The Company received proceeds of $33,500 and recognized a gain of $8,033, which is recorded in other operating profit in the consolidated statements of net income for the year ended December 31, 2015. This divestiture did not meet the discontinued operations criteria.

In the third quarter of 2014, the Company completed the sale of its thermal and emissions product line, a non-core product line, to Halla Visteon Climate Control Corp. The Company received proceeds of $44,937 and recognized a gain of $16,036, which is recorded in other operating profit in the consolidated statements of net income for the year ended December 31, 2014. This divestiture did not meet the discontinued operations criteria.

In the fourth quarter of 2014, the Company completed the sale of its non-core Australian business. The Company received proceeds of $2,449 and recognized a gain of $891, which is recorded in other operating profit in the consolidated statements of net income for the year ended December 31, 2014. This divestiture did not meet the discontinued operations criteria.

4. Restructuring

On an ongoing basis, the Company evaluates its business and objectives to ensure that it is properly configured and sized based on changing market conditions. Accordingly, the Company has initiated certain restructuring initiatives, including plant rationalizations and targeted workforce reduction efforts, as deemed appropriate.

 

F-17


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

In addition to previously initiated actions, in January 2015, the Company announced its intention to further restructure its European manufacturing footprint based on current and anticipated market demands. The total estimated cost of this initiative, which is expected to be completed by 2017, is approximately $125,000, of which approximately $48,000 has been incurred to date.

The Company previously implemented several other restructuring initiatives, including the closure or consolidation of facilities throughout the world, the establishment of a centralized shared services function in Europe and the reorganization of the Company’s operating structure. While substantially complete, the Company continues to incur costs on some of these initiatives, primarily related to the disposal of the respective facilities.

The Company’s restructuring charges consist of severance, retention and outplacement services and severance-related postemployment benefits (collectively, “employee separation costs”), other related exit costs and asset impairments related to restructuring activities.

The following table summarizes the restructuring expense by segment for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015      2014      2013  

North America

   $ 5,232       $ 105       $ 2,033   

Europe

     47,868         16,866         19,061   

Asia Pacific

     744         443         626   

South America

                       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 53,844       $ 17,414       $ 21,720   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table summarizes the activity for all restructuring initiatives for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014:

 

     Employee
Separation
Costs
    Other Exit
Costs
    Asset
Impairments
    Total  

Balance at December 31, 2013

   $ 14,710      $ 16      $      $ 14,726   

Expense

     3,316        14,098               17,414   

Cash payments

     (5,658     (13,829            (19,487

Foreign exchange translation and other

     (1,531     (285            (1,816
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2014

   $ 10,837      $      $      $ 10,837   

Expense

     29,720        23,696        428        53,844   

Cash payments

     (6,765     (21,859            (28,624

Foreign exchange translation and other

     (1,085     (69     (428     (1,582
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2015

   $ 32,707      $ 1,768      $      $ 34,475   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

F-18


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

5. Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment is comprised of the following:

 

     December 31,     Estimated
Useful Lives
 
     2015     2014    

Land and improvements

   $ 71,079      $ 80,638        10 to 25 years   

Buildings and improvements

     237,499        222,825        10 to 40 years   

Machinery and equipment

     760,250        669,030        5 to 10 years   

Construction in progress

     130,615        133,398     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   
   $ 1,199,443      $ 1,105,891     

Accumulated depreciation

     (434,074     (389,878  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Property, plant and equipment, net

   $ 765,369      $ 716,013     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Due to the deterioration of financial results at certain of its facilities, the Company impaired property, plant and equipment at one of its European facilities and two of its South American facilities during 2015 and at two of its European facilities and two of its North American facilities during 2014. Fair value was determined using the estimated salvage value, which was deemed the highest and best use of the assets. A summary of these asset impairment charges is as follows:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2015              2014      

Europe

   $ 2,285       $ 6,107   

South America

     11,345           

North America

             18,466   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 13,630       $ 24,573   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Depreciation expense totaled $100,535, $96,143 and $95,597 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

6. Goodwill and Intangibles

Goodwill

The changes in the carrying amount of goodwill by reportable operating segment for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 are summarized as follows:

 

     North America     Europe     South America      Asia Pacific     Total  

Balance at December 31, 2013

   $ 119,870      $ 14,460      $       $ 5,371      $ 139,701   

Acquisition

            218                       218   

Divestitures

     (1,746     (595             (44     (2,385

Foreign exchange translation

     (515     (1,717             (133     (2,365
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2014

   $ 117,609      $ 12,366      $       $ 5,194      $ 135,169   

Acquisition

                           19,812        19,812   

Divestiture

     (2,548                           (2,548

Foreign exchange translation

     (952     (1,310             (952     (3,214
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2015

   $ 114,109      $ 11,056      $       $ 24,054      $ 149,219   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

Intangible Assets

The following table presents intangible assets and accumulated amortization balances of the Company as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively:

 

     Gross Carrying
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
    Net Carrying
Amount
 

Customer relationships

   $ 115,285       $ (61,375   $ 53,910   

Developed technology

     8,854         (7,673     1,181   

Other

     16,290         (679     15,611   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2015

   $ 140,429       $ (69,727   $ 70,702   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Customer relationships

   $ 133,471       $ (59,773   $ 73,698   

Developed technology

     9,252         (6,842     2,410   

Other

     6,701         (500     6,201   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2014

   $ 149,424       $ (67,115   $ 82,309   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

During 2015, the Company acquired intangible assets of $15,340 with a weighted average useful life of 24.8 years as a result of the Shenya acquisition. This consisted of $5,110 of customer relationships, $180 of patents and $10,050 of land-use rights with weighted average amortization periods of 14.8, 3.3 and 30.2 years, respectively.

During the fourth quarter of 2015, the customer relationship intangible asset related to the Company’s South America segment was determined to be fully impaired as a result of the deterioration of the economic conditions in the region, resulting in an impairment charge of $7,981. Fair value was determined using the excess earnings method, based on the reporting unit’s cash flow expectations and consideration of the discount rate. During the fourth quarter of 2014, certain patents in the Company’s North America segment were written down to their estimated fair values, resulting in an impairment charge of $1,700.

Amortization expense totaled $13,892, $16,437 and $15,431 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Estimated amortization expense for the next five years is shown in the table below:

 

Year

   Expense  

2016

   $ 12,789   

2017

     12,130   

2018

     11,716   

2019

     11,632   

2020

     5,640   

 

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Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

7. Debt

Outstanding debt consisted of the following at December 31, 2015 and 2014:

 

     December 31,  
     2015     2014  

Term loan (net of $6,096 and $7,137 unamortized issuance costs, respectively)

   $ 729,841      $ 735,765   

Other borrowings

     48,071        42,972   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total debt

   $ 777,912      $ 778,737   

Less current portion (net of $1,161 and $1,158 unamortized issuance costs, respectively)

     (45,494     (35,631
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total long-term debt

   $ 732,418      $ 743,106   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The principal maturities of debt, at nominal value, at December 31, 2015 are as follows:

 

Year

   Debt and Capital
Lease Obligations
 

2016

   $ 47,190   

2017

     9,793   

2018

     9,633   

2019

     9,480   

2020

     9,475   

Thereafter

     701,250   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 786,821   
  

 

 

 

Term Loan Facility

On April 4, 2014, certain subsidiaries of the Company entered into a Term Loan Facility (the “Term Loan Facility”) in order to (i) refinance the Senior Notes and Senior PIK Toggle Notes, including applicable call premiums and accrued and unpaid interest, (ii) pay related fees and expenses and (iii) provide for working capital and other general corporate purposes. The Term Loan Facility provides for loans in an aggregate principal amount of $750,000 and may be increased (or a new term loan facility added) by an amount that will not cause the consolidated first lien debt ratio to exceed 2.25 to 1.00 plus $300,000. All obligations of the borrower are guaranteed jointly and severally on a senior secured basis by the direct parent company of the borrower and each existing and subsequently acquired direct or indirect wholly-owned U.S. restricted subsidiary of the borrower. The obligations are secured by amongst other items (a) a first priority security interest (subject to permitted liens and other customary exceptions) on (i) all the capital stock in restricted subsidiaries directly held by the borrower and each of the guarantors (limited to 65% of the capital stock of any foreign subsidiaries), (ii) substantially all plant, material owned real property located in the U.S. and equipment of the borrower and the guarantors and (iii) all other personal property of the borrower and the guarantors, and (b) a second priority security interest (subject to permitted liens and other customary exceptions) in accounts receivable of the borrowers and the guarantors arising from the sale of goods and services, inventory, excluding certain collateral and subject to certain limitations. Loans under the Term Loan Facility bear interest at a rate equal to, at the Borrower’s option, LIBOR, subject to a 1.00% LIBOR Floor plus an applicable margin of 3.00% or the base rate option (the highest of the Federal Funds rate

 

F-21


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

plus 0.50%, prime rate, or one-month Eurodollar rate plus 1.00%), plus an applicable margin of 2.00%. The Term Loan Facility matures on April 4, 2021. On April 4, 2014, the aggregate principal amount of $750,000 was fully drawn to extinguish the Senior Notes and the Senior PIK Toggle Notes and to pay related fees and expenses. Debt issuance costs of approximately $7,900 were incurred on this transaction, along with the original issue discount of $3,750. Both the debt issuance costs and the original issue discount are amortized into interest expense over the term of the Term Loan Facility. As of December 31, 2015, the principal amount of $738,750 was outstanding. As of December 31, 2015, the Company had $2,813 of unamortized original issue discount.

Senior ABL Facility

On April 4, 2014, CS Intermediate Holdco 1 LLC (“Parent”), CSA U.S. (the “U.S. Borrower”), Cooper-Standard Automotive Canada Limited (the “Canadian Borrower”), Cooper-Standard Automotive International Holdings BV (the “European Borrower” and, together with the U.S. Borrower and Canadian Borrower, the “Borrowers”), and certain subsidiaries of the U.S. Borrower entered into the Second Amended and Restated Loan Agreement (the “Senior ABL Facility”), which amended and restated the then existing senior secured asset based revolving agreement dated May 27, 2010, in order to permit the Term Loan Facility and other related transactions. The Senior ABL Facility provided for an aggregate revolving loan availability of up to $150,000, subject to borrowing base availability, including a $60,000 letter of credit sub-facility and a $25,000 swing line sub-facility. The Senior ABL Facility also provided for an uncommitted $105,000 incremental loan facility, for a potential total Senior ABL Facility of $255,000 (if requested by the Borrowers and the lenders agree to fund such increase).

On June 11, 2014, the same parties entered into Amendment No. 1 to the Senior ABL Facility, which increased the aggregate revolving loan availability to $180,000, subject to borrowing base availability, principally by expanding a tooling receivable category of eligible borrowing base availability for the U.S. borrower and Canadian borrower. The Senior ABL Facility, as amended, also now provides for an uncommitted $75,000 incremental loan facility, for a potential total Senior ABL Facility of $255,000 (if requested by the Company and one or more new or existing lenders agree to fund such increase). No consent of any lender (other than those participating in the increase) is required to effect any such increase.

As of December 31, 2015, there were no borrowings under the Senior ABL Facility. As of December 31, 2015, subject to borrowing base availability, the Company had $180,000 in availability less outstanding letters of credit of $42,593.

Any borrowings under the Senior ABL Facility will mature, and the commitments of the lenders under the Senior ABL Facility will terminate, on March 1, 2018. Proceeds of the Senior ABL Facility may be used to issue commercial and standby letters of credit, to finance ongoing working capital needs and for general corporate purposes. Loan (and letter of credit) availability under the Senior ABL Facility is subject to a borrowing base, which at any time is limited to the lesser of: (A) the maximum facility amount (subject to certain adjustments) and (B) (i) 85% of eligible accounts receivable; plus (ii) the lesser of 70% of eligible inventory or 85% of the appraised net orderly liquidation value of eligible inventory; minus reserves established by the Agent. The accounts receivable portion of the borrowing base is subject to certain formulaic limitations (including concentration limits). The inventory portion of the borrowing base is limited to eligible inventory, as determined by the Agent. The borrowing base is also subject to certain reserves, which are established by the Agent (which may include changes to the advance rates indicated above). Loan availability under the Senior ABL Facility

 

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

is apportioned to the Borrowers as follows: $150,000 to the U.S. Borrower which includes a $60,000 sublimit to the European Borrower and $30,000 to the Canadian Borrower.

Obligations under the Senior ABL Facility and cash management arrangements and hedging arrangements, in each case with the lenders and their affiliates (collectively “Additional ABL Secured Obligations”) entered into by the U.S. Borrower are guaranteed on a senior secured basis by the Company and all of our U.S. subsidiaries. Obligations of the Canadian Borrower under the Senior ABL Facility and Additional ABL Secured Obligations of the Canadian Borrower and its Canadian subsidiaries are guaranteed on a senior secured basis by the Parent, its U.S. subsidiaries and the Canadian Borrower and Canadian subsidiaries. Obligations of the European Borrower under the Senior ABL Facility are guaranteed on a senior secured basis by the Parent and all of its U.S. subsidiaries. The obligations under the Senior ABL Facility are secured by amongst other items (a) a first priority security interest in accounts receivable of the U.S. borrower and the U.S. guarantors arising from the sale of goods and services, and inventory, excluding certain property and subject to certain limitations (with obligations of the Canadian borrower secured also by comparable assets of the Canadian borrower and Canadian guarantors) and (b) a second priority security interest (subject to permitted liens and other customary exceptions) on (i) all the capital stock in restricted subsidiaries directly held by the U.S. borrower and each of the U.S. guarantors, (ii) substantially all material owned real property located in the U.S. and equipment of the U.S. borrower and the U.S. guarantors and (iii) all other material personal property of the U.S. borrower and the U.S. guarantors.

Borrowings under the Senior ABL Facility bear interest at a rate equal to, at the Borrowers’ option:

 

    in the case of borrowings by the U.S. Borrower, LIBOR or the base rate plus, in each case, an applicable margin;

 

    in the case of borrowings by the Canadian Borrower, BA rate, Canadian prime rate or Canadian base rate plus, in each case, an applicable margin; or

 

    in the case of borrowings by the European Borrower, LIBOR plus an applicable margin.

The applicable margin may vary between 1.50% and 2.00% with respect to the LIBOR or BA-based borrowings and between 0.50% and 1.00% with respect to base rate, Canadian prime rate and Canadian base rate borrowings. The applicable margin is subject, in each case, to quarterly pricing adjustments based on usage over the immediately preceding quarter.

In addition to paying interest on outstanding principal under the Senior ABL Facility, the Borrowers are required to pay a fee in respect of committed but unutilized commitments. The Borrowers are also required to pay a fee on outstanding letters of credit under the Senior ABL Facility, together with customary issuance and other letter of credit fees. The Senior ABL Facility also requires the payment of customary agency and administrative fees.

The Borrowers are able to voluntarily reduce the unutilized portion of the commitment amount and repay outstanding loans, in each case, in whole or in part, at any time without premium or penalty (other than customary breakage and related reemployment costs with respect to repayments of outstanding borrowings).

 

F-23


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

Prepayment of the Notes

In 2014, the Company and Cooper-Standard Automotive Inc. commenced cash tender offers for any and all of the previously outstanding 8 12% Senior Notes due 2018 (“Senior Notes”) and 7 3/8% Senior PIK Toggle Notes due 2018 (“Senior PIK Toggle Notes”). Approximately 49% of the Senior Notes and 99% of the Senior PIK Toggle Notes were tendered and purchased on April 4, 2014, and the funds to redeem the remainder were deposited with the Trustee. The remaining redemptions were completed on April 21, 2014 for the Senior Notes and May 5, 2014 for the Senior PIK Toggle Notes. As a result of the purchases and redemptions, the Company recognized a loss on extinguishment of $30,488, which was primarily due to call and make-whole premiums and the write off of approximately $4,500 in original issue discount and debt issuance costs. The Company used borrowings under the Term Loan Facility, together with cash on hand, to finance the repurchase and redemption of the Senior Notes and the Senior PIK Toggle Notes.

Debt Covenants

The Senior ABL Facility includes affirmative and negative covenants that impose substantial restrictions on the Company’s financial and business operations, including their ability to incur and secure debt, make investments, sell assets, pay dividends or make acquisitions. The Senior ABL Facility also includes a requirement to maintain a monthly fixed charge coverage ratio of no less than 1.0 to 1.0 when availability under the Senior ABL Facility is less than specified levels or an event of default has occurred. The Senior ABL Facility also contains various events of default that are customary for comparable facilities.

The Company was in compliance with all covenants of the Senior ABL Facility and Term Loan Facility as of December 31, 2015.

Other

Other borrowings at December 31, 2015 and 2014 reflect borrowings under capital leases, local bank lines and accounts receivable factoring sold with recourse classified in debt payable within one year on the consolidated balance sheet.

Interest paid was $39,192, $56,488 and $52,925 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

8. Pensions

The Company maintains defined benefit pension plans covering employees located in the United States as well as certain international locations. The majority of these plans are frozen, and all are closed to new employees. Benefits generally are based on compensation, length of service and age for salaried employees and on length of service for hourly employees. The Company’s policy is to fund pension plans such that sufficient assets will be available to meet future benefit requirements.

The Company also sponsors voluntary defined contribution plans for certain salaried and hourly U.S. employees of the Company. The Company matches contributions of participants, up to various limits based on its profitability, in substantially all plans. The Company also sponsors a retirement plan that includes Company non-elective contributions. Non-elective and matching contributions under these plans totaled $16,296, $14,489 and $13,609 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

F-24


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollar amounts in thousands except per share and share amounts)

 

The following tables disclose information related to the Company’s defined benefit pension plans:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2015     2014  
     U.S.     Non-U.S.     U.S.     Non-U.S.  

Change in projected benefit obligation:

        

Projected benefit obligations at beginning of period

   $ 322,330      $ 210,720      $ 293,488      $ 196,495   

Service cost

     926        3,489        850        3,367   

Interest cost

     12,334        5,084        13,479        7,069   

Actuarial (gain) loss

     (12,227     (4,940     47,944        36,857   

Benefits paid

     (16,603     (7,315     (14,331     (9,588

Foreign currency exchange rate effect

            (24,548            (23,226

Settlements

            (2,919     (19,100     (692

Other

            325               438   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Projected benefit obligations at end of period

   $ 306,760      $ 179,896      $ 322,330      $ 210,720   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Change in plan assets:

        

Fair value of plan assets at beginning of period

   $ 268,862      $ 74,660      $ 269,601      $ 70,929   

Actual return on plan assets

     (10,136     1,929        22,892        9,874   

Employer contributions

     6,264        8,534        9,800        9,979   

Benefits paid

     (16,603     (7,315     (14,331     (9,588

Foreign currency exchange rate effect

            (9,949            (5,842

Settlements

            (2,919     (19,100     (692
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Fair value of plan assets at end of period